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eBook Wrestling with Gravy: A Life, with Food ePub

eBook Wrestling with Gravy: A Life, with Food ePub

by Jonathan Reynolds

  • ISBN: 0812972880
  • Category: Professionals and Academics
  • Subcategory: Biography
  • Author: Jonathan Reynolds
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Random House Trade Paperbacks; Reprint edition (October 7, 2008)
  • Pages: 352
  • ePub book: 1309 kb
  • Fb2 book: 1194 kb
  • Other: mbr rtf lrf lit
  • Rating: 4.3
  • Votes: 531

Description

Wrestling with Gravy book.

Wrestling with Gravy book. In this inviting feast of a memoir, former New York Times food columnist Jonathan Reynolds dishes up a life that is by turns hilarious and tender–and seasoned with the zest of cooking, family, eating, and lounging around various tables in tryptophanic stupors.

Books for People with Print Disabilities. Internet Archive Books.

In Wrestling With Gravy, Jonathan Reynolds employs the form to sketch a nonfiction picaresque

In Wrestling With Gravy, Jonathan Reynolds employs the form to sketch a nonfiction picaresque. A playwright by vocation, Reynolds is a contrarian by inclination and the author of Stonewall Jackson’s House, a play in which a black docent leads a wealthy white couple through the home of a Confederate general before halting the tour and asking if they will adopt her as their slave. Reynolds - who made his name among the food-obsessed while writing a biweekly column for The New York Times Magazine - uses recollections of meals cooked and eaten to explain himself and indulge various dalliances.

Jonathan Reynolds is an award-winning playwright, actor, screenwriter (for both film and television), and author. His monthly column on food appears in The New York Times Magazine. His plays include Dinner with Demons, Stonewall Jackson's House, which received a Pulitzer recommendation, and Geniuses, among several others. He received a Guggenheim grant for playwriting in 2004. Reynolds lives in New York with his wife, the producer and designer Heidi Ettinger, and is distinguished by his two sons, Frank and Edward. Библиографические данные. Wrestling with Gravy: A Life, with Food.

Always absorbing, often very funny, and surprisingly affecting, Wrestling with Gravy is a rich and wry memoir, seasoned with the zest of cooking, family, conversation-and lounging around in tryptophanic stupors

Always absorbing, often very funny, and surprisingly affecting, Wrestling with Gravy is a rich and wry memoir, seasoned with the zest of cooking, family, conversation-and lounging around in tryptophanic stupors.

Wrestling with Gravy. Always absorbing, often very funny, and surprisingly affecting, Wrestling with Gravy is a rich and wry memoir, seasoned with the zest of cooking, family, conversation–and lounging around in tryptophanic stupors.

Wrestling with Gravy: A Life, with Food. by Jonathan Reynolds. Wrestling with Gravy - Jonathan Reynolds. Read on the Scribd mobile app. Download the free Scribd mobile app to read anytime, anywhere. 2,99 $. Beaten, Seared, and Sauced: On Becoming a Chef at the Culinary Institute of America.

In this inviting feast of a memoir, former New York Times food columnist Jonathan Reynolds dishes up a life that is by turns hilarious and tender–and seasoned with the zest of cooking, family, eating, and lounging around various tables in tryptophanic stupors.

Praise for Wrestling with Gravy: Reynolds writes about his rambunctious life with wit and gusto. The Washington Post Book World A food memoir of sorts by a somewhat famous person (that I hadn't heard of -playwright and food writer. Entertainment Weekly. An ingenious, multifaceted memoir, full of food and fury. The Washington Post Book World. Reynolds tells the tale as well as sharing the recipe. Even if we don’t actually make his pissaladière au confit de canard or the simpler sea urchin ceviche, to read through the intricate steps in these preparations reminds readers of the drama and delight of great eating. A food memoir of sorts by a somewhat famous person (that I hadn't heard of -playwright and food writer.

Always absorbing, often very funny, and surprisingly affecting, Wrestling with Gravy is a rich and wry memoir, seasoned with the zest of cooking, family, conversation–and lounging around in tryptophanic stupors. With droll self-effacement and a sharp eye for detail, former New York Times food columnist Jonathan Reynolds shares wonderful characters and anecdotes: He relives the time that his father made a move on his girlfriend during a meal at Maxim’s in Paris; extols the surprising virtues of baseball stadium cuisine (except in New York); and recounts how he once whipped up a seductive meal for a woman, only to have her excuse herself after dessert because she had another date lined up. Even on a glum Christmas day in New York City, and at the deathbed of his dear cousin the actress Lee Remick, food offers solace and a cathartic sense of home. Like a truly great meal, Wrestling with Gravy will entertain and satisfy any reader’s appetite.Praise for Wrestling with Gravy:“Reynolds writes about his rambunctious life with wit and gusto.”–Entertainment Weekly“An ingenious, multifaceted memoir, full of food and fury. It’s hilarious, tender, poignant, and tart–as nourishing as it is entertaining.”–John Berendt, author of Midnight in the Garden of Good and Evil “Picaresque . . . Reynolds is at his best when purposefully entangling libido and linguine. . . . He’s expert at the confessional.”–The New York Times Book Review“Fun–and intimate . . . Big-name kitchens and celebrities . . . make appearances, and their recipes do, too.”–The Washington Post Book World“Reynolds tells the tale as well as sharing the recipe. Even if we don’t actually make his pissaladière au confit de canard or the simpler sea urchin ceviche, to read through the intricate steps in these preparations reminds readers of the drama and delight of great eating.”–Publishers Weekly“Consistently entertaining.”–The Atlanta Journal-Constitution

Comments

YSOP YSOP
Reynolds writes well. He clearly knows and loves food, and I'm willing to bet the recipes work. That said, I just can't stand this book, for the simple reason that I can't stand Reynolds. I have never met the man and never want to: My acquaintance with him is entirely a function of the "self" he offers up in this memoir. And it's a "self" that I find really repellent. He's massively misogynistic, can't seem -- at the age of well over 40 -- to get past his resentment of his Mommy, hoards the memories of petty slights from sometime during the Carter administration as though they were gold (which, clearly, they are for him: He loves holding grudges like I love grilled-cheese sandwiches), is obsessed with keeping score, and raises pettiness to an art-form. Though in retrospect, even more than his repellent politics, it's his behavior toward women that really sets my teeth on edge. He calls himself a "feminist." In a pig's eye.
Ber Ber
We were doing research on one of Donald W Reynold's spouses, Bobbie K Crockett, not mentioned in this book and if known by the author was not considered worthy of mention. It is my understanding she ended destitute in Los Angeles, so appears to have been less fortunate than Jonathan's mother. Donald W Reynolds appears to have been much better in death than life and Jonathan did a good job of portraying his father without insulting him. Good writer!
Runehammer Runehammer
Reynolds is a self-absorbed, boring "artiste" who seemed to think, for no reason I can discern, that the details of his life were remarkable. Furthermore, the "food" in the title is limited to a paragraph or two and a couple of recipes at the end of each chapter.