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eBook The Doctor Will See You Now ePub

eBook The Doctor Will See You Now ePub

by Max Pemberton

  • ISBN: 0340919957
  • Category: Professionals and Academics
  • Subcategory: Biography
  • Author: Max Pemberton
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Hodder; Reprint edition (February 9, 2012)
  • Pages: 336
  • ePub book: 1238 kb
  • Fb2 book: 1208 kb
  • Other: docx lrf azw mobi
  • Rating: 4.6
  • Votes: 757

Description

Max Pemberton is a doctor, writer and journalist. 4 Book of the Week, and was subsequently followed by two more books about his experiences working in the NHS, Where Does it Hurt? and The Doctor Will See You Now.

Max Pemberton is a doctor, writer and journalist. His first book, Trust Me, I'm a (Junior) Doctor, was a Radio 4 Book of the Week, and was subsequently followed by two more books about his experiences working in the NHS, Where Does it Hurt? and The Doctor Will See You Now. He is currently a columnist for the Daily Mail and Reader's Digest, and a regular contributor to the Spectator.

Max Pemberton is a junior doctor with the NHS. He has just started work at the hospital after a year treating outreach . In this book I can see the doctor has gained confidence and is training in psychiatry. It is still an enjoyable and funny read however it was very touching indeed. He has just started work at the hospital after a year treating outreach patients. He says that ‘Within twenty four hours I had gone from a hanging around street corners, wearing jeans and a t-shirt an bribing patients so I could check their blood pressure, to being a proper, tie wearing, stethoscope waving medic. Less humor and Back in March I read and loved a book "Trust me, I'm a junior doctor" by a British medical doctor called Max Pemberton.

If you enjoy Trust Me, I'm a (Junior) Doctor, don't miss the follow-up titles Where Does It Hurt? and The Doctor Will See You Now.

Starting on the evening before he begins work as a doctor, this book charts Max Pemberton's touching and funny journey through his first year in the NH. If you enjoy Trust Me, I'm a (Junior) Doctor, don't miss the follow-up titles Where Does It Hurt? and The Doctor Will See You Now.

Author(s): Max Pemberton. Title: The Doctor Will See You Now. Binding: Paperback. Max Pemberton is a practicing doctor and has worked in a broad range of medicine from A&E, geriatrics, adult psychiatry, surgery and paediatric palliative care

Author(s): Max Pemberton. Publication Date: 2012-02-02. Max Pemberton is a practicing doctor and has worked in a broad range of medicine from A&E, geriatrics, adult psychiatry, surgery and paediatric palliative care. He is also a columnist for the Daily Telegraph and Reader's Digest. Recently, he has won several awards for his writing, including the Mind Journalist of the Year and the Royal College of Psychiatrits 2010 award for Public Educator of the Year.

back on the wardsAfter a year on the streets treating outreach patients, Max Pemberton is back in the relative comfort of hospital. This time running between elderly care and the dementia clinic to A&E and outpatients

back on the wardsAfter a year on the streets treating outreach patients, Max Pemberton is back in the relative comfort of hospital. This time running between elderly care and the dementia clinic to A&E and outpatients. No longer inexperienced (Max and his doctor friends can now tell when someone is actually dead), they are on the front line of patient care for better or worse.

The NHS is one of those things that everyone seems to have an opinion about, and this of course includes those of us who work for said organisation (the world's 3rd largest employer, don'tcha know). Max Pemberton is one of those people: a doctor, though despite what you might assume from the title, not a GP but a hospital medic. This is his third book on the subject of life (and death) within the walls of a hospital, plus the odd excursion to rather misnamed Care Homes, and it's not a bad read.

Author : Max Pemberton. Publisher : Hodder & Stoughton. Max's take on medicine and those who practice and receive it is uniquely funny, insightful and touching. Users who liked this book, also liked. Trust Me, I'm a (Junior) Doctor. Further Confessions of a GP (The Confessions Series). Sick Notes: A Doctor's Tale from the Front Lines of Medicine. Direct Red: A Surgeon's View of Her Life-or-Death Profession.

The Doctor Will See You Now was a virtual representation of one of Kassandra's genetic memories, relived by Layla Hassan through the Portable Animus HR-8. Kassandra agreed to help the physician Hippokrates recover his notes needed to save a patient in critical condition. Kassandra: The mighty Tiryns. Built by the cyclopes, or so the legend goes.

Note Doctor's best perk and really strong perk overall. When you damage a generator, the next's skillcheck will be really really small so you have 85% chance that survivor will fail this and regress the generator progress by the goddamn 13/14/15% total

Note Doctor's best perk and really strong perk overall. When you damage a generator, the next's skillcheck will be really really small so you have 85% chance that survivor will fail this and regress the generator progress by the goddamn 13/14/15% total. Goes well with Hex: Ruin and makes skillchecks pain in the butt. Strong perk that I'll use on every killer. 5. Good Perks, Perk Builds. I believe this is the most optimal build for Doctor, it has everything a high rank killer would want.

The doctor is back again and on the wards! Now in his third year as junior doctor, Max looks and sounds the part. But this time around, things are not at all as he expected ...

The junior doctor ... back on the wards. After a year on the streets treating outreach patients, Max Pemberton is back in the relative comfort of hospital. This time running between elderly care and the dementia clinic to A&E and outpatients. No longer inexperienced (Max and his doctor friends can now tell when someone is actually dead), they are on the front line of patient care for better or worse.

In the midst of an NHS still under threat (some things never change) there are committed and caring doctors, big issues, hope, frustration, huge societal changes affecting the entire health system as well as the general drama of everyday life in a big hospital, from biscuit wars to resus. It's not like television, this is real - there are no easy answers - but The Doctor Will See You Now will give you hope that there are enough good doctors asking the questions.

Comments

Marilore Marilore
I like Pemberton's books because he highlights social problems without sounding preachy. In this book he is back at the hospital working in the A&E and with elderly mental health patients. As always, he recounts both funny and sad anecdotes. I hope he writes another book soon.
Broadcaster Broadcaster
This book sees the author back in a hospital job, covering A&E and working in geriatrics and psychiatry. Geriatrics is something of a Cinderella speciality and dealing with geriatric patients with psychiatric problems is even less popular. There are some heart rending stories and some which remind the reader that there is still good in human nature.

The author's flat mates feature largely in this book - Flora, Ruby and a new inmate - Terry - who for a change is not a doctor. Lewis is battling with the problem of telling his family about his life style. Patients come and go and some will stick in your mind long after you finish reading the book. The elderly man who had broken his shoulder and who no one would treat because he also had schizophrenia; the man who couldn't understand that his life savings were now in a bank and went round accusing everyone of stealing them; the man in his 50s with CJD who kept piling furniture up in corners because he had been a removal man before the disease struck him.

What I found particularly touching was the innovative ways nurses found to deal with these patients. The former removal man just needed telling, for example, that it was tea break time and he would sit down and stop rearranging the furniture. This simple solution meant his wife could look after him at home for much longer. The care demonstrated by some of the nurses was absolutely marvellous. One of them could interpret the smallest change in facial expression of one of his patients and knew exactly what he needed and what was wrong with him even though the doctor didn't.

I found the ways the hospital spheres of influence worked interesting and parallels can probably be found in any large organisation. People in unlikely jobs often have much more power than could normally be expected from their job title alone; the secretary - Trudy - the provider of cake to celebrate and commiserate who always knew everything that was going on. The typing pool where there was a temporary typist who could listen to his iPod and his dictation tapes at the same time and who wanted to be a doctor showed the author that you should never judge by appearances.

Some marvellous characters and some thought provoking situations show that as a society we are seriously neglecting out old people - especially those with mental illnesses. If you are approaching an age when this sort of thing is likely to affect you personally then this book may keep you awake at night wondering whether you could end up sedated in a nursing home because no one has the time to treat you properly as a human being. Staff such as the author himself, Marsha and Dr Webber will give the reader hope that things can change for the better. There are people who care and who want to make a difference.
Agagamand Agagamand
I enjoyed this book. Especially the comedy inserted in serious areas of medicine. It does seem to jump around a bit. Also keeping all the flat mates organized in my head was tricky. Great read though.