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eBook Mississippi Sissy ePub

eBook Mississippi Sissy ePub

by Kevin Sessums

  • ISBN: 0312341024
  • Category: Professionals and Academics
  • Subcategory: Biography
  • Author: Kevin Sessums
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Picador; First edition (March 4, 2008)
  • Pages: 352
  • ePub book: 1460 kb
  • Fb2 book: 1595 kb
  • Other: azw lit docx mbr
  • Rating: 4.2
  • Votes: 945

Description

FREE shipping on qualifying offers. Mississippi Sissy is the stunning memoir from Kevin Sessums, a celebrity journalist who grew up scaring other children.

FREE shipping on qualifying offers.

Books for People with Print Disabilities. Internet Archive Books. Delaware County District Library (Ohio).

My mother had attempted, after my father’s sudden death, to go back to school to get her teaching degree in English he rest of her days as a secreta.

My mother had attempted, after my father’s sudden death, to go back to school to get her teaching degree in English he rest of her days as a secretary who, as a beautiful widow, would be fair game for the wanton advances of a seersucker-wearing cracker boss in some Mississippi backwater, made her eyes brim with even more tears. Just between us, Kevin, ‘shorthand’ sounds to me more like a deformity from which some poor soul might suffer, a physical affliction rather than a secretarial skill,.

Writer for Vanity Fair, etc. Wrote NY Times bestsellers Mississippi Sissy and I Left It on the Mountain

Mississippi Sissy by Kevin Sessums-Audiobook Excerpt

Mississippi Sissy by Kevin Sessums-Audiobook Excerpt. Listen to this audiobook excerpt from Mississippi Sissy, the stunning memoir from Kevin Sessums, a celebrity journalist who grew up scaring other children, hiding terrible secrets, pretending to be Arlene Frances and running wild in the South. Kevin Sessums seamlessly weaves his heart-breaking, funny, outrageous, can't-put-it-down story. Mississippi Sissy is a book I've been waiting for most of my life, though I didn't fully understand that fact until I read. Kevin Sessums is some sort of cockeyed national treasure.

In Mississippi Sissy, Kevin Sessums, one of our best-known celebrity journalists, creates a great panorama . I was so moved by Kevin Sessums's funny, sad evocation of his childhood and teenage years in Mississippi Sissy.

I was so moved by Kevin Sessums's funny, sad evocation of his childhood and teenage years in Mississippi Sissy.

Most of Mississippi Sissy has the feel of someone reaching for material

In the realm of worst-childhood one-upmanship, Sessums, a magazine writer, can surely compete. Most of Mississippi Sissy has the feel of someone reaching for material. Reading it, one can’t help thinking of Sessums as some kind of amateur magician onstage at last in the bright lights, fishing desperately through the grab bag of his experiences for something - anything - of sufficient pathos, gravitas or name-dropping enviability to justify the price of admission. In the last category, for example, via Frank Hains, Sessums makes the acquaintance of Eudora Welty.

Kevin Sessums was born in 1956 in Forest, Mississippi. His brother is artist Dr. J. Kim Sessums of Brookhaven, Mississippi. Sessums attended, but dropped out of, the Juilliard School in New York City. His work has also appeared in Travel+Leisure, Elle, Out, Marie Claire, Playboy, Thedailybeast.

Mississippi Sissy is the stunning memoir from Kevin Sessums, a celebrity journalist who grew up scaring other children, hiding terrible secrets, pretending to be Arlene Frances and running wild in the South.

As he grew up in Forest, Mississippi, befriended by the family maid, Mattie May, he became a young man who turned the word "sissy" on its head, just as his mother taught him. In Jackson, he is befriended by Eudora Welty and journalist Frank Hains, but when Hains is brutally murdered in his antebellum mansion, Kevin's long road north towards celebrity begins. In his memoir, Kevin Sessums brings to life the pungent American south of the 1960s and the world of the strange little boy who grew there.

"Kevin Sessums is some sort of cockeyed national treasure.” ―Michael Cunningham

Comments

Aloo Aloo
Kevin Sessums brings us an almost alternate universe in his book, ‘Mississippi Sissy’. Kevin, a product of Forest, Mississippi in the 1960’s, lived a much different life than I can relate. His family had black people who worked for them, waited on them, and in many senses never reached the social strata of their white employers. Kevin loved them, but did not know at his young age how to differentiate.

When Kevin and his brother and sister were small, their father died in an auto accident. A year later their mother died of cancer. Brought up by loving grandparents, Kevin identified early on with his feminine side. His family understood this, not really accepting it, but in their way they understood. Kevin was into game shows and loved Arlene Francis, and liked to be called Arlene. As strange as this may seem to us, this was Kevin. His life was a moras of trying to find himself and figure out where he was going. Kevin gives us his life.

Kevin was befriended by a journalist Frank Haines, who gave him some structure in his young life, just before he was was off to college. Frank introduced him to Eudora Welty, and his literary life was born. We meet many characters,of the South, and at times their conversations seem overdone, too much, as if Kevin wants to give us a a glimpse of a more exciting and lively time in his life. Sadness and misery are a big part of this book. Kevin's long road toward his life in journalism, has begun. I read Kevin’s second book, ‘I Left It On The Mountain’ first, and feel he gave a better sense of who he is. However, Mississippi Sissy is the basis of his existence, and where he learned what being a Sissy meant to his life. The first book was finding his footing, and the second book was a search for his true self. All of the trials and tribulations of a young gay man are on public view, and this book at this time in our culture is helpful in trying to understand what place sexual identification has in our everyday lives.

Recommended. prisrob 01-16-18
Best West Best West
This book touched my heart. I felt so many emotions while reading it. Having grown up in Mississippi almost a generation ahead of the author, there were many connections. The racism, sometimes ignorant and sometimes intentional, among the residents was something I saw as a child and hated. I left in my early 20's and felt shame for what went on there during the 60’s. I also know how the jocks and others bullied and shamed anyone who appeared to be a sissy. I hurt for them anytime I saw it happen. My empathy returned when Kevin Sessums shared his most shameful secrets of his young life. How cruel a fate to grow up as a homosexual in an unforgiving, intolerant place like Mississippi. He is, however, one of the lucky ones, because he was able to get away and find a life better accepted in other places. In many ways I am proud to be from Mississippi, I love the manners, the food, the friendliness and fond memories of friends during my (segregated) childhood there. But in other ways I feel ashamed to be from a state so ignorant and unkind to certain classes of people. This book took me back to a culture I thought I'd left far behind and forgotten. Obviously not, since I felt much sadness, anger and disgust during the reading of this book. But reminders are good. I hope I will always remember to be kind and understanding to others, whoever they are. I've tried to learn from what I saw and knew to be wrong, and have raised my own children to be open-minded, accepting and tolerant, as well as kind, to others, no matter how different. So for that I guess I can be thankful for the childhood I spent in Mississippi. I may not have had the same awareness had I grown up elsewhere.

This book ia a treasure, shining with honesty, beautifully and courageously written. I am looking forward to reading Sessums's next book,"I Left it on the Mountain."
Nicearad Nicearad
Excellent memoir of a young man coming to terms with a difficult life and his sexual orientation which literally made him a small pariah even as a little boy. There is a terrible injustice at the heart of this story -- the injustice of small children losing both parents when they were in their 30's and the children were 8, 6, and four. The injustice of discriminating against people based on sexual orientation via unkind comments and actions even to a child. Thoughtless racial discrimination that was prevalent and even occurred when otherwise decent people were "friendly" with their black employees and neighbors or in Sessums case, the woman who cared for him as a little boy.
It's a well-written honest book that I am very glad I read.
Άνουβις Άνουβις
Def a 5 star book. I have given this twice as a gift and both people couldn't put it down. The title says it, the experience of gay youth in the south staying afloat and surviving another day. While reading it's as if you are in the room as an observer, the author's fluid writing style carries you page to page. This book is especially poignant and often times funny through the eyes of the author as a child. It is in the vein of Burroughs. For many reading this will bring them back to their youth, can be bitter, can be sweet, can be both. I think for many it's confirmation they lived it alone in fear and figuring out the steps as they went along and all the time hiding in plain sight, and in particular as they land into adolescence realizing that most of them are really playing a part until they can escape into adulthood.