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eBook Doc: The Story of Dennis Littky and His Fight for a Better School ePub

eBook Doc: The Story of Dennis Littky and His Fight for a Better School ePub

by Susan Kammeraad-Campbell

  • ISBN: 0809246112
  • Category: Regional U.S.
  • Subcategory: Biography
  • Author: Susan Kammeraad-Campbell
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Contemporary Books; First Edition edition (November 1, 1989)
  • Pages: 403
  • ePub book: 1367 kb
  • Fb2 book: 1343 kb
  • Other: lit lrf mbr docx
  • Rating: 4.8
  • Votes: 989

Description

Kammerad-Campbell, a journalist who originally covered Littky for the New England This is a paperbound reprint of a 1998 book

Kammerad-Campbell, a journalist who originally covered Littky for the New England This is a paperbound reprint of a 1998 book

In 2005, his book The Big Picture: Education Is. .Doc: The Story of Dennis Littky and His Fight for a Better School. Susan Kammeraad-Campbell (2005). Association for Supervision and Curriculum Development.

In 2005, his book The Big Picture: Education Is Everyone's Business won an Association of Educational Publishers award for nonfiction. Excellence Through Equity: Five Principles of Courageous Leadership to Guide Achievement for Every Student Archived 2015-11-25 at the Wayback Machine Alan M. Blankstein, Pedro Noguera (2015).

Susan Kammeraad-Campbell does a great job of taking us behind the scenes and observing how Littky went about .

Susan Kammeraad-Campbell does a great job of taking us behind the scenes and observing how Littky went about convincing both turned-off students and cynical staff members to stay on, tune in and get involved. The task was monumental, and many had failed before him. Did Littky succeed? Many would say he did, but not all would agree. Well, here's the story of how Littky set about it. It also tells what happened when people disagreed with what he was doing, who disagreed with his "liberal ideas", people both in and out of the school. The story is an excellent reminder of just how much cooperation is required to make a school a success.

Kammeraad-Campbell, Susan. Books for People with Print Disabilities. Internet Archive Books.

At last the story of a school administrator who cares

At last the story of a school administrator who cares.

Doc. Susan Kammeraad-Campbell. 1 2 3 4 5. Want to Read. Are you sure you want to remove Doc from your list? Doc.

Doc: The Story of Dennis Littky and His Fight for a Better School. Read how Littky's philosophy of personalized learning-one student at a time-quickly achieved dramatic improvements

Susan Kammeraad-Campbell does a great job of taking us behind the scenes and . Campbell tries to answer the question, can a successful school story like Thayer's sustain itself after Littky leaves? Or is it always a matter of personalities?

Kammeraad-Campbell, Susan (Contemporary Books, 1989)

Kammeraad-Campbell, Susan (Contemporary Books, 1989). The students of Thayer High School, along with their parents, fought to reinstate their principal, Dennis Littky, whose controversial firing by the school board over his unorthodox teaching methods had split the town of Winchester, . into two opposing factions. The author, a journalist, follows the story & reports the results of their efforts. Previous Page Next Page. Books About New Hampshire.

Susan Kammeraad-Campbell. This was new principal Dennis Littky’s message to his staff at Thayer High School-the vision that would guide the rural school’s journey from run-down district joke to national showplace. Our role is to look at every student as an individual and to help him or her grow. The unorthodox methods he championed, including integrated subject matter, team teaching, apprenticeship, advisories, and individualized curriculum, shook up the failing school and helped to transform a disaffected and dropout-prone student body into a proud and vibrant community of learners.

The story of an eccentric, charismatic high-school principal whose astounding success at motivating would-be dropout and delinquent students and whose unorthodox methods fueled both a movement to depose him and one fought by students and parents who rallied for this local hero

Comments

Xar Xar
This is the book that inspired me to think more about how I teach instead of just what I teach. I recommend it to anyone who is pursuing a degree in education but especially to those pursuing a masters degree in school administration!
Tegore Tegore
This book has inspired my boss, just like I knew it would. Great book, great price, everyone in education could learn something from Doc!
Malodred Malodred
How previously successful principal Littky retired to a cabin in the Appalachian mountains and was persuaded to help revitalize failing Thayer High School, Winchester, N-H. He did well, but not everyone in town was happy; then the drama started. A fascinating account of one man trying to put into practice many of Ted Sizer's progressive ideas (see Horace's Compromise, Horace's School and Horace's Hope) and the resistance he ran into.

I couldn't put it down. Littky decided to take the challenge and try to put his ideas into practice. He was accused by some of using the school and its students as guinea-pigs for his "grand experiment" in psychological manipulation, his grab for power. Many disagreed with his ideas and his vision; some were persuaded, some were not, even after seeing what he had done with the school. People disagreed with what the "evidence" showed, or even what it was!

Susan Kammeraad-Campbell does a great job of taking us behind the scenes and observing how Littky went about convincing both turned-off students and cynical staff members to stay on, tune in and get involved. The task was monumental, and many had failed before him. Did Littky succeed? Many would say he did, but not all would agree.

Littky seems to have a gift for making learning and teaching fun. But it's not all about pedagogy or classroom techniques: it's also about building the right environment, both physically and emotionally. How does one set about practically breaking down the artificial walls erected between school "subjects"? How does one persuade teachers to go along with this plan and actually make it work? How does one set standards that require meaningful learning, and not just measure the amount of hours spent in school? And how does one persuade teachers and parents to support this venture? Well, here's the story of how Littky set about it. It also tells what happened when people disagreed with what he was doing, who disagreed with his "liberal ideas", people both in and out of the school. The story is an excellent reminder of just how much cooperation is required to make a school a success.

Although the book is obviously sympathetic to Littky, Susan Kammeraad-Campbell does try to get into the heads of those who opposed him. However, it seems she was not able to spend as much time with them or persuade them to talk to her to the extent that Littky and his supporters were, and they don't come out of the story very well. Campbell tries to answer the question, can a successful school story like Thayer's sustain itself after Littky leaves? Or is it always a matter of personalities? The afterwords by Campbell and by Littky himself try to answer these questions, but inevitably it seems Littky's personality was a powerful and vital ingredient in the mix.

As a postscript, here's a quote from Sizer's book "Horace's Hope": "During 1983, while I was writing Horace's Compromise, I accepted a number of speaking engagements with school people to test my ideas and the directions in which they might lead me. At the conclusion of one such gathering in Massachusetts, I was confronted by a smiling, balding, red-bearded, plaid-shirt-wearing character who bluntly said, 'You talk about it. We do it. You better get your butt up to my school.' He was Dennis Littky. I went to his school..." Thayer Junior/Senior High School was the first to join Sizer's Coalition of Essential Schools.
LoboThommy LoboThommy
naive, 6th grade, the oldest of three girls in my family... None of us had any experience with middle school.. Yet none of us could have been more changed by a school based on Doc s theories.

As a homeschooler of four daughters, I value the education I received Docs care, and so many others, who believed in us, as young citizens with a voice, and an opinion - even if it was varied.

The staff that supported Doc in all his endeavors at SWR Middle School were, and are still, amazing.

It was an experience I am grateful for,and hopefully, my grandchildren, etc., will still see the effects of this open minded,and thought provoking establishments.

Re: :College Unbound

Tell them Doc sent you.
MOQ MOQ
So, I didn't read this book. I was fortunate enough to have had Dennis Littky as my principal in 1972-1975, prior to the time period of the story in this book. "Doc" was probably the most amazing educator that I've ever come across, and both of my parents are educators. What he did that was so amazing is to bring life into school! It was a hands-on approach to learning, and a lust for learning, that I can tell you is most rare!

So, I will be buying this book because I want to re-live those experiences, and learn from Doc all over again!
Taulkree Taulkree
Excellent read. Have been a fan of "Doc" since I first read about him-late 70's I think.
I am a retired public schoolteacher/administrator.

He has a heart for students and -at least for me-has been inspirational.