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eBook The Feminine Mystique ePub

eBook The Feminine Mystique ePub

by Betty Friedan

  • ISBN: 0140022619
  • Category: Specific Groups
  • Subcategory: Biography
  • Author: Betty Friedan
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Penguin Books Ltd (June 24, 1976)
  • Pages: 368
  • ePub book: 1101 kb
  • Fb2 book: 1853 kb
  • Other: mbr rtf azw doc
  • Rating: 4.5
  • Votes: 341

Description

It was published on February 19, 1963 by W. W. Norton

It was published on February 19, 1963 by W. Norton.

The Feminine Mystique. norton & company. This is how I first encountered Betty Friedan’s The Feminine Mystique. When I read the book myself, eight years later, as an assignment for a women’s studies class at Barnard, I immediately understand why my mother had become so engrossed that she found herself reading in the place usually reserved for cooking. I don’t believe she was particularly enthralled by Friedan’s systematic evisceration of the theories of Sigmund Freud, or the prescient indictment of American consumerism.

Have not women who live in the image of the feminine mystique trapped themselves within the narrow walls of their homes? . For it is considered normal feminine adjustment, in America and in most countries of the world

Have not women who live in the image of the feminine mystique trapped themselves within the narrow walls of their homes? They have learned to adjust to their biological role. For it is considered normal feminine adjustment, in America and in most countries of the world. But one could apply to millions of women, adjusted to the housewife’s role, the insights of neurologists and psychiatrists who have studied male patients with portions of their brain shot away and schizophrenics who have for other reasons forfeited their ability to relate to the real world. The Feminine Mystique. feminism, housewives, marriage, womens movement, feminist theory, history, women. folkscanomy sexuality; folkscanomy; additional collections. ark:/13960/t1kh6wg19.

Chapter 5 from Betty Friedan's epoch-making 'Feminie Mystique', on Freud. The feminine mystique derived its power from Freudian thought; for it was an idea born of Freud, which led women, and those who studied them, to misinterpret their mothers’ frustrations, and their fathers’ and brothers’ and husbands’ resentments and inadequacies, and their own emotions and possible choices in life.

It did not really start, in America, until the 1940’s en, born merely to breed and se. .

It did not really start, in America, until the 1940’s en, born merely to breed and serve men-were not so easily dispelled by the crusading feminists, by science and education, and by the democratic spirit after all. They merely reappeared in the forties, in Freudian disguise

Betty Friedan, the feminist crusader and author whose searing first book, "The Feminine Mystique," ignited the contemporary women's movement in 1963 and as a result permanently transformed the social fabric of the United.

Betty Friedan, the feminist crusader and author whose searing first book, "The Feminine Mystique," ignited the contemporary women's movement in 1963 and as a result permanently transformed the social fabric of the United States and countries around the world, died yesterday, her 85th birthday, at her home in Washington

The Feminine Mystique': Betty Friedan's Book 'Started It All'. The book about women's fulfillment inspired women's liberation. Friedan was inspired to write "The Feminine Mystique" when she attended her Smith College 15-year reunion in the late 1950s

The Feminine Mystique': Betty Friedan's Book 'Started It All'. Friedan was inspired to write "The Feminine Mystique" when she attended her Smith College 15-year reunion in the late 1950s. She surveyed her classmates and learned that none of them was happy with the idealized housewife role. However, when she tried to publish the results of her study, women’s magazines refused.

Comments

Doulkree Doulkree
I've read many books in the area of history. And certainly, I've been conscious of the substantial difference between women's lives then when compared with now. But the depth and pervasiveness of this silent emotional suffering is something I lacked the consciousness to feel. The sensation of my eyes being opened to an emotional existence I was unaware of, is the same feeling I felt when in high school I read the Diary of Anne Frank. It's overwhelmingly sad to realize that the human condition was made to endure these feelings, as an institution. This book provoked a childhood memory which I never understood. Now, more than 20 years later, in light of the insights this book has gifted me, I finally understand that night.
Chinon Chinon
In the Feminine Mystique, Betty Friedan put a spotlight on the hidden, yet immense problems women faced during the 1950’s. Her work propelled the stagnant women’s rights movement into its second wave and helped women reclaim some equality. Despite focusing on the seemingly small problems of middle class white women, the legacy of the book has paved the way for more universal movements towards equality. Readers interested in the history of women’s rights and the progress that has been made should pick up a copy.

Friedan does a great job explaining the context of her writing to contemporary and modern readers. She makes a compelling case that the status of women initially improved during World War II, but then reverted as men returned from the fight. Her perspective is quite unique. As a magazine writer she’s able to show the changing opinion of society vocalized through the media. By counting the number of magazine articles that portray women as empowered individuals, Friedan is able to quantify this ideological shift.

In this context Friedan pointed out that something was wrong. She recognized that women lived in a tiny sphere of influence and led unfulfilling lives. She argued that “we can no longer ignore that voice within women that says: ‘I want something more than my husband and my children and my home’”. After the book’s release in 1963 it spent 6 weeks on the New York Time’s best seller list and sold 1.4 million copies. This goes to show how much her message resonated. The book also made me think about the experience of my grandparents in a new way.

While the book is progressive in one area, readers should beware of its regrettable comments about homosexuals, mental disease, and concentration camps. Friedan argues that house-wives smother their children with love, preventing them from growing up. This leads to promiscuity and homosexuality, which “is spreading like a murky smog over the American scene”. As well, she brazenly makes the comparison that women “are in as much danger as the millions who walked to their own death in the concentration camps”. This argument only made me contrast the relatively small plight of women with the immense inhumanity of the holocaust. Finally, she implies that schizophrenia and autism in children are the result of mothers over accommodating their kids. These passages are not worth reading.

Despite the book’s flaws and age, it’s still significant today. Women’s equality has advanced greatly in the last half century, yet they still face similar challenges. Jobs with the highest proportion of female workers are still nurses, school teachers, social workers and other traditional roles according to U.S. DOL 2010 figures. The arguments of the Feminist Mystique are still valid. Buy this book if you’d like to better understand how the role of women has evolved and continues to change.
Burisi Burisi
I read it because two of our daughters are Women's Studies majors and I figured eventually they'll be reading this book as well, and it can give us something to talk about. Before reading, I first looked at this book as a "historical" perspective of the women's movement; how wrong I was. The information is vitally relevant even today. Women still do not have equality in the workplace and earn much less than their male colleagues. The Equal Rights Amendment never passed at the State level. While many doors have opened, we are still not equal and do not have legal protections for us in place. While this book opened up my 55-year-old eyes (at long last), I also gained a better understanding of my mother and my mother-in-law and why they are the ardent consumers they are. If my daughters don't have to read this book as required reading, I will make them read it!
Mamuro Mamuro
I had read this book when it first came out and it was interesting to compare my earlier thoughts with this 50 year edition. It is amazing how much of it is relevant today. The problem which had no name became the feminine mystique. Why are so many housewives unhappy? Their goal was to marry well, have children and live in a nice house in the suburbs but having achieved that they realized that their identity was only as wife and mother. The book offers ways to change.
Umrdana Umrdana
Ladies, the next time you decide you don't want to cook dinner that night, that you'd rather read a book instead... I want you to give a little fist-bump to the heavens in honor of Betty Friedan. It's because of her that you even have that opportunity to make that choice.

Let's clear something up right now - The Feminine Mystique is not a text on how to become a man-hating, radical. If that's what you think this is about, my review isn't going to change your mind so you might as well stop reading it now.

The Feminine Mystique does, however, bring attention and awareness to the mystique that is femininity - that women are good for use of their wombs and their cooking skills and maybe one or two other things, so long as those things benefit the husband (and maybe the children) more than anyone else. Friedan noticed that there was this "problem that could not be named" , this increase in fatigue in women across the country, a form of depression that made them want to sneak a few drinks when the kids were off to school or to pop a couple Valium while they vacuum the house every couple of days. What Friedan wanted to bring attention to was that it didn't need to be that way. That women could be educated, and they did not have to get married right after high school, that they could have a career as well as a family, if they so desired.

Her thesis is that women stop growing after a certain point - for some women it's in grade school, for some women it's in high school. Even the women who went to college (keep in mind that this book was published in 1963 so her focus was primarily on the fifties in America) went just to hone their skills as a woman and to (hopefully) find a man. Once the ring went on the finger, the women became housewives and had children, but then couldn't figure out why they were so unhappy. Because they hadn't actually finished growing....Duh! It makes perfect sense really - you're no good to anyone if you haven't evolved yourself.