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eBook Loose Girl: A Memoir of Promiscuity ePub

eBook Loose Girl: A Memoir of Promiscuity ePub

by Kerry Cohen

  • ISBN: 1401309925
  • Category: Specific Groups
  • Subcategory: Biography
  • Author: Kerry Cohen
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Hachette Books; Reprint edition (June 2, 2009)
  • Pages: 240
  • ePub book: 1398 kb
  • Fb2 book: 1672 kb
  • Other: docx rtf txt doc
  • Rating: 4.7
  • Votes: 129

Description

Loose Girl is Kerry Cohen's captivating memoir about her descent into promiscuity and how she gradually found her way toward real intimacy.

Loose Girl is Kerry Cohen's captivating memoir about her descent into promiscuity and how she gradually found her way toward real intimacy. The story of addiction-not just to sex, but to male attention-Loose Girl is also the story of a young girl who came to believe that boys and men could give her life meaning. In rich and immediate detail, Loose Girl re-creates what it feels like to be in that desperate moment, when a girl tries to control a boy by handing over her body, when the touch of that boy seems to offer proof of something, but ultimately delivers little more than emptiness.

Loose Girl: A Memoir of Promiscuity. Loose Girl is Kerry Cohen’s captivating memoir about her descent into promiscuity and how she gradually found her way toward real intimacy. Publisher: Hyperion, New York, 2008. It didn’t matter who he was. It was their movement that mattered, their being together. And for a while, that was enough.

Kerry Cohen is eleven years old when she recognizes the power of her body in the leer of a grown man. Her parents are recently divorced and it doesn't take long before their lassitude and Kerry's desire to stand ou. . Her parents are recently divorced and it doesn't take long before their lassitude and Kerry's desire to stand out-to be memorable in some way-combine to lead her down a path she knows she shouldn't take. Kerry wanted attention.

Some girls turn to anorexia. Others to alcohol, drugs, cutting, sports, ambition. They don’t get at how easy it is for a girl to use sex for attention

Some girls turn to anorexia. I am not the only one by far. One of every three girls has had sex by age sixteen, and two out of three by age eighteen. Statistics for 2003 show slightly more girls than boys have had sex before the age of twenty, and casual sex in high school is near equal for boys and girls. They don’t get at how easy it is for a girl to use sex for attention. A boy once said to me, Boys have to put forth real effort to get laid, while all you have to do is stand braless in the wind.

So often, memoir has proven to be a vehicle for proselytization or even vindication, but Cohen resists the temptation to assign blame or explain away the personal impulses that drove her to reckless behaviors and a pattern of promiscuity and heartbreak. Instead she is straightforward and clear, exploring her own weaknesses and her dysfunctional quest for love and intimacy through unrewarding physical relationships. Cohen's writing style is engaging and intimate.

Электронная книга "Loose Girl: A Memoir of Promiscuity", Kerry Cohen

Электронная книга "Loose Girl: A Memoir of Promiscuity", Kerry Cohen. Эту книгу можно прочитать в Google Play Книгах на компьютере, а также на устройствах Android и iOS. Выделяйте текст, добавляйте закладки и делайте заметки, скачав книгу "Loose Girl: A Memoir of Promiscuity" для чтения в офлайн-режиме.

Author of: Girl Trouble, Loose Girl: A Memoir of Promiscuity and 8 other books.

Kerry Cohen's journey from that hopeless place to her current confident and fulfilled existence is both a cautionary tale and a revelation. Loose Girl is Kerry Cohen's captivating memoir about her descent into promiscuity and how she gradually found her way toward real intimacy. The story of addiction--not just to sex, but to male attention--Loose Girl is also the story of a young girl who came to believe that boys and men could give her life meaning. Never less than riveting, Loose Girl re-creates what it feels like to be in that desperate moment when a girl tries to control a boy by handing over her body, when the touch of that boy seems to offer proof of something but ultimately delivers little more than emptiness. The unforgettable story of one young woman who desperately wanted to matter, Loose Girl will speak to countless others with its compassion, understanding, and love.

Comments

Iaran Iaran
This was a hard book to read, because Cohen is absolutely unflinching with the truth. But it was also rewarding and redemptive by the end. She writes "clear and hard about what hurts." For those reading this for titillation or escapism, you'll be disappointed. If you're looking for a harrowing, but ultimately satisfying healing journey, you'll find it here. Loose Girl is filled with self-destructive behavior, small victories, setbacks when coping mechanisms fail, a moment of empowerment when Cohen decides to take ownership of her healing, and then embraces self-love and reconnection with others who love and support her.

Cohen's mix of internal dialogue (exposition) and external plot kept me deeply engaged and turning pages. I cried for the young Cohen who couldn't cry herself. And rejoiced when she finally stepped toward healing.

Highly recommended, with the caveat that this (should be no surprise with the title and subject matter) is an R-rated story due to sexual scenes, underage drug and alcohol use, and swearing. It never once felt gratuitous to this reader. It felt raw and heart-breaking.

If I had any critique, it would be that the final scenes felt slightly rushed. I would have liked to linger with that deep calm and peace that came to Cohen as she began developing true relationships with her now-husband. It had been so hard-earned, I would have liked to be more of a part of it. Regardless, this is a well-written memoir and I'm grateful to Cohen for her bravery in sharing. I think she'll help others along their healing journey with these words.
Ieslyaenn Ieslyaenn
Memoirs have the same power and shortfalls as those found in personal therapy. The power comes from the individual speaking the truth of her/his life. The downfall is the individual's perspective is limited to his/her own experience. When a person risks the vulnerability of letting others see them, as much as one can be so transparent, as they see them themselves a magical even can occur. The listener has the occasion to become likewise vulnerable, at least to one's Self, in respect to one's on life. Ms. Cohen, a child of privilege and divorce, is that kind of vulnerable and transparent in this memoir that the invitation offered the reader to become likewise open, is frightening.
When Ms. Cohen was eleven her parents divorced; neither her engineer father nor her "artistic" mother had sufficient Self to give the author or her sister the love, limits or guidance they needed. Instead, her mother abandons both girls to the care of their father in order to pursue a medical degree; her father's idea of parenting is being a "buddy" and buying them things. The gap this lack leaves in Ms. Cohen is deep and one she spends the next 20 years trying to fill by seeking a sense of self through external affirmations. The path she chooses in trying to achieve this goal is using her sexuality to ensnare someone into a meaningful, fulfilling relationship.
As Ms. Cohen ages ("matures" would be an overstatement) she can see the choices she is making are poor, self-defeating and she feels powerless to resist them. To witness those numerous, cyclic attempts is tedious and painful, as it must have been for the author to have experienced. In describing herself, she appears as a classic Co-Dependent (one who is dependent/addicted to relationships &/or people to be "complete"). Her approach to relationships, as they are described, has more the flavor of addiction than they do of connection. She feels she knows what she is looking for but has no idea how to obtain it, that for which she searches does not exist - a person who "will make me whole by being with me."
The book ends abruptly with a sense of being incomplete, with the author married to "someone who will love me," yet she continues to exhibit the emptiness that has plagued her all her life. The information listed about Ms. Cohen on the book's dust jacket states she is a psychotherapist, still married and the mother of two sons. One can suppose she has achieved some level of success.
This is a book about an individual's descent into unhealthy relationships using sex as an object to trap someone into loving her. It is somewhat graphic and profane in its discussion about sex. Her ability to succeed in showing her desperation without being vulgar is an indication of her writing abilities. The only violent moments are shown to reveal the depth of her hopelessness. Those who read this book will better understand the pain of addiction.
Villo Villo
I thoroughly enjoyed reading this memoir. I am a fan of memoirs, but most that I've read are about
people and places that I will never know or understand. But Kerry tells the story of a girl who we
all know, or have been. In these times, even moreso than in mine, there are young girls "looking
for love in all the wrong places". I commend Kerry for being willing to put this cautionary tale
out there for young women and teenage girls to read and learn from. With all the divorce in today's society,
girls like Kerry occur more and more frequently. Sad? yes. True? Absolutely!
The biggest caution is to divorcing parents: Make Sure Your Children Know They Are Loved! When you
choose to become a parent, you are choosing to put that child (or those children) before your own
needs. Sorry if this bothers some of you parents out there.
Kerry's problem stems from not feeling loved by her parents. Does that mean they DIDN'T love her?
Of course not. But a child doesn't know how to compartmentalize the thoughts and emotions and say
"Mommy and Daddy don't love each other, but they still love me." You have to say that over and over
to the child. That means that you have to actually BE THERE to tell them, which Kerry's mother wasn't.
And Kerry's father was looking out for himself in the way he treated his daughter.
So, to the readers out there who put Kerry down, try to get past your own feelings of self-loathing
and see this as a tale about ALL of us. After all, aren't we all just looking to feel loved? And
haven't most of us made our share of mistakes in that process?
DrayLOVE DrayLOVE
This book was a look into a mirror of sorts for me. There are very many similarities in the way a lot of girls are raised and grow up in this country. We all have a negative view and a common misconception of what true love is suppose to be. The story kept me in rapt attention until the end.
Sadly, I had hoped to find out more about how she overcame her addictions to touch and sex. I wanted more from her story of love with her current husband. So in that sense I feel it fell short because once she got to a life that we all end up in that we all seek it seemed too rushed and didn't delve deep enough into what realizations we all must come to in order to get to that point.
Well written otherwise and definitely a book every teen girl and young adult may want to read.