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eBook Circumstantial Evidence: Death, Life, And Justice In A Southern Town ePub

eBook Circumstantial Evidence: Death, Life, And Justice In A Southern Town ePub

by Pete Earley

  • ISBN: 0553573489
  • Category: True Crime
  • Subcategory: Biography
  • Author: Pete Earley
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Bantam (August 1, 1996)
  • Pages: 512
  • ePub book: 1639 kb
  • Fb2 book: 1378 kb
  • Other: lit lrf docx lrf
  • Rating: 4.8
  • Votes: 345

Description

His book Circumstantial Evidence: Death, Life, and Justice in a Southern Town won an Edgar Award from the Mystery . Pete's sister, Alice Lee Earley, was killed at the age of 17 on June 14, 1966 when she was hit by a car while riding Pete's scooter

His book Circumstantial Evidence: Death, Life, and Justice in a Southern Town won an Edgar Award from the Mystery Writers of America for Best Fact Crime Book in 1996. His book about the John Walker spy ring, Family of Spies, was a New York Times bestseller and was made into a CBS miniseries starring Powers Boothe and Lesley Ann Warren. Pete's sister, Alice Lee Earley, was killed at the age of 17 on June 14, 1966 when she was hit by a car while riding Pete's scooter. Pete himself was 14 years old and at church camp when Alice was killed. Pete subsequently wrote about Alice's death (including interviewing the woman who drove the car that.

Death, Life, & Justice in a Southern Town. In Monroeville, Alabama, a young, pretty student was found murdered. Pete Earley is the bestselling author of such books as The Hot House and Crazy

Death, Life, & Justice in a Southern Town. Several months later, a black man with no criminal record was sentenced to death for the crime. Pete Earley is the bestselling author of such books as The Hot House and Crazy. When he is not spending time with his family, he tours the globe advocating for mental health reform. As a former reporter for The Washington Post, Pete uses his journalistic background to take a fair-minded approach to the story all while weaving an interesting tale for the reader.

Circumstantial Evidence book. Now Earley shows us a different, even more intimate view of justice-and tyle.

On a busy Saturday morning in November 1986, in the small southern town of Monroeville, Alabama, a beautiful white teenager named Ronda Morrison was found brutally murdered in the back room of the dry cleaning store where she worked

On a busy Saturday morning in November 1986, in the small southern town of Monroeville, Alabama, a beautiful white teenager named Ronda Morrison was found brutally murdered in the back room of the dry cleaning store where she worked. His guilt was seen as unquestionable until a young, black, Harvard-educated Yankee lawyer launched his own investigation into the murder.

Circumstantial Evidence" leaves readers outraged. The new "To Kill a Mockingbird. "-Gerry Spence, author of "How to Argue and Win Every Time". Now Earley shows us a different, even more intimate viewof justice-and tyle.

Circumstantial Evidence is the title Mr. Earley gives to this massive and detailed reconstruction of the murder of a Southern Belle, its shoddy . It's a true life story that follows a murder in a small Southern town in the 1980s

Circumstantial Evidence is the title Mr. Earley gives to this massive and detailed reconstruction of the murder of a Southern Belle, its shoddy investigation by overly ambitious and politically motivated sheriffs, police officers and state investigators, its prosecution by several racially biased county attorneys, its supposed black perpetrator shanghied onto death row for eight years by this good-old-boy justice, his dedicated. It's a true life story that follows a murder in a small Southern town in the 1980s. The town is racist, and a black man gets sentenced to death on circumstantial evidence for the crime.

Pete Earley's The Hot House gave America a riveting, uncompromising look at the nation's most notorious prison-the . An excerpt from Circumstantial Evidence.

Now Earley shows us a different, even more intimate view of justice-and tyle. Bryan Stevenson turned his Toyota Corolla onto Interstate 65 and pushed down on the accelerator, merging the well-traveled import into the parade of cars hurrying south from Montgomery.

Circumstantial Evidence : Death, Life, and Justice in a Small Town. The town is racist, and a black man gets sentenced to death on circumstantial evidence for the crime

Circumstantial Evidence : Death, Life, and Justice in a Small Town. by Pete Early and Pete Earley. The book doesn't reveal who may have really done the murder until the last few pages! Meanwhile, a million different scenarios are offered by low lifes cutting deals with the police and the . to get out of prison early. All of the scenarios seem plausible, so you spend half the book wondering if this person or that person may have done the murder.

Reporter Pete Earley presents, in novelistic and graphic detail, the true story of the frame-up, conviction, and . Stevenson, a campaigner against the death penalty, noticed the McMillan case because McMillan had no prior criminal record, unlike most death-row inmates

Reporter Pete Earley presents, in novelistic and graphic detail, the true story of the frame-up, conviction, and eventual release of an African American male from the Alabama death ro. Stevenson, a campaigner against the death penalty, noticed the McMillan case because McMillan had no prior criminal record, unlike most death-row inmates. His early appeals and investigations were thwarted by an uncooperative state court system. By the time that Stevenson had uncovered various irregularities concerning the case, he and his colleagues were receiving numerous anonymous threats.

Pete Earley's The Hot House gave America a riveting, uncompromising look at the nation's most notorious prison--the federal penitentiary in Leavenworth, Kansas--a book that Kirkus Reviews called a "fascinating white-knuckle tour of hell,  brilliantly reported." Now Earley shows us a different, even more intimate view of justice--and injustice--American-style.In Monroeville, Alabama, in the fall of 1986, a pretty junior  college student was found murdered in the back of the dry  cleaning shop where she worked. Several months later, Walter "Johnny D." McMillian, a black man with no criminal record, was tried, convicted, and sentenced to death for the crime. As McMillian sat in his cell on Alabama's death row, a young black lawyer named Bryan Stevenson took up his own investigation into the murder of Ronda Morrison. Finding a trial tainted by procedural mistakes, conflicting eyewitness accounts, and outright perjury, he was determined to see McMillian go free--even if it took the most unconventional means...

Comments

Bluddefender Bluddefender
I had read about this book & it did not disappoint. Basically the history of 2 murders in Alabama in the late 1980's. One happened in Monroeville, where Harper Lee lived & wrote her famous book " To Kill a Mockingbird ". The similarities of that story to the real murders are so close. Law officers who are deeply racist & eager to convict & execute a black man, hatred of white/black sexual relations, the boredom of small, southern towns. The evidence set out is, as it was, confusing to both law officers & lawyers. Into the case comes a dedicated, Harvard trained lawyer & 2 FBI agents, dedicated to the truth. I will not spoil your pleasure in following the trail which leads to Death Row. Whether justice was ever really done to the victims, their families or the accused and their families is not simple. That the cases happened in such recent times Is particularly shocking. The book is marvellously written by Pete Earley, his journalistic background shows to advantage as he makes mountains of confusing evidence clear to the reader. He also manages the difficult task of understanding both sides, here is no anti-system rant, but a cool, sympathetic assessment of what went wrong and what went right. To read it is to learn, to learn is to go some way to prevent injustice.
Ohatollia Ohatollia
Circumstantial Evidence is the title Mr. Earley gives to this massive and detailed reconstruction of the murder of a Southern Belle, its shoddy investigation by overly ambitious and politically motivated sheriffs, police officers and state investigators, its prosecution by several racially biased county attorneys, its supposed black perpetrator shanghied onto death row for eight years by this good-old-boy justice, his dedicated defender, Bryan Stevenson, who persists with the case to its eventual overturn through years of repudiated requests for habeas-corpus relief, and all the related characters, noble and outrageous, who inhabit Monroe County and those nearby in rural Alabama. Circumstantial Evidence is a gripping title, perhaps, but not an accurate one. There was really no evidence against the man who was arrested by desperate lawmen after several months of vain effort to find a suspect. As is often the case throughout our country evidence against a "suspect" is artfully created through testimony by known villains whose vengeful and self-serving motives form a sub-plot in this true tale that Earley has skillfully rearranged to read like a fictional case history. Unfortunately, it is not fiction. The case was so egregious that after the denial of one appeal, Stevenson went public and attracted Sixty Minutes to do a feature on the case. This unfavorable publicity seems to be the only prod that forced Alabama officials to take a second look. Even so, they dared hold the falsely accused and condemned man for several weeks after the reversal of his conviction. What the reader will learn here is that the rights supposedly secured for us by our Constitution are chimerical for everyone in many places and at times when politics, economics, and bias supersede the patient search for truth. If the reader was surprised or made indignant by the outcome of the Simpson case, he will find much more here to fuel outrage; the case will, perhaps, lend an insight into why the OJ jury voted as it did. Until such county injustice is rooted out--and doing away with the death penalty would remove much unfair prosecutorial grandstanding from our justice system--we cannot say that the Constitution is realized, nor can we say that the Civil War is over.
Vut Vut
The murder occurs in the town that provided the setting for the book "Too Kill a Mockingbird."
Earley is an extremely talented writer whose style makes it impossible to put this book aside. It is written in chronological order, which makes it comparable to fiction novels.
The story is a tale of police blunders, hidden evidence by the police, lying witnesses and jilted girlfriends. It will make you question the guilt of current death row inmates because district attorney's and cops will commit felonies to win a conviction.
I read the book because Ann Rule spoke very highly of his writing ability and she was 100% correct. He is one of the best non-fiction, though he could probably cross over to fiction, writers in the world.
The murder remains unsolved, though police think they know who killed her, because of a lack of evidence. Bryan Stevenson has received national honors for his work with death row inmates, McMillan has never regained the small tree business that was lost after his conviction. He does day labor in the same town.
None of the police officers were charged since investigation "mistakes" were considered to be "honest mistakes."
Adrielmeena Adrielmeena
This book has SO many twists and turns you won't be able to put it down. It's a true life story that follows a murder in a small Southern town in the 1980s. The town is racist, and a black man gets sentenced to death on circumstantial evidence for the crime. The book doesn't reveal who may have really done the murder until the last few pages! Meanwhile, a million different scenarios are offered by low lifes cutting deals with the police and the D.A. to get out of prison early. All of the scenarios seem plausible, so you spend half the book wondering if this person or that person may have done the murder. Very exciting book. Also reveals the dark side of our justice system.
Trash Trash
Everyone needs to read this book. This book shows the real Monroeville, Al. The home of Harper Lee of To Kill A Mockingbird fame. It shows itself to be the same town it was in 1900 and throughout history. A basin for bigotry for those who do not look beyond themselves.
Shomeshet Shomeshet
I grew up in this area and I can't say I'm surprised by the railroading of a black man or how he was treated after his arrest. Unfortunately, racism is still alive in these parts. I wish they would move to arrest the real killer. Her parents deserve peace.
Zainian Zainian
Very good book.
a real page-turner...and I only apply that phrase to about 1% of the books I read and I read about 100/yr. Once you open the book don't make any plans for anything else; that's how captivating it is.