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eBook Dream of the Golden Mountains ePub

eBook Dream of the Golden Mountains ePub

by Malcolm Cowley

  • ISBN: 0140059199
  • Subcategory: Biography
  • Author: Malcolm Cowley
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Penguin Books; 1st edition (October 29, 1981)
  • Pages: 352
  • ePub book: 1211 kb
  • Fb2 book: 1590 kb
  • Other: mobi lrf lrf mbr
  • Rating: 4.1
  • Votes: 399

Description

But the dream proved to be an ilusion, an unattainable dream because human nature was ignored by the revolutionists. Like many literary expatriates of the early 20th century, Malcolm Cowley had a tendency to examine and re-examine his life

But the dream proved to be an ilusion, an unattainable dream because human nature was ignored by the revolutionists. Like many literary expatriates of the early 20th century, Malcolm Cowley had a tendency to examine and re-examine his life. He started formalizing this process in his literary history of the 1920s, Exile's Return. Years later, he looked back on the 1930's in The Dream of the Golden Mountains. Taken together, these books show the shifts in thinking that were taking place in the first few decades of the 20th century.

After Cowley's book on the Lost Generation, which ends on the pairing of the Crash of 1929 with the suicide of Harry Crosby, he gives us his experience in the 1930s. It starts with him getting a nice job at The New Republic which allows him to weather the decade financially, and the death of Hart Crane near the start of this book mirrors the death of Crosby in its predecessor.

Another volume in Cowley's retrospective. com User, December 23, 2004.

Cowley, Malcolm, 1898-. Books for People with Print Disabilities. Internet Archive Books. es index, Cowley, Malcolm, 1898-, Communism and literature, Authors, American. New York : Viking Press. Uploaded by Lotu Tii on January 11, 2012. SIMILAR ITEMS (based on metadata). Terms of Service (last updated 12/31/2014).

June 17, 2012 History by Malcolm Cowley.

June 17, 2012 History. The dream of the golden mountains. Published 1980 by Viking Press in New York.

To Cowley in 1932, the old life of the 1920’s seemed inexcusably wasteful of time and emotions.

In 1934 Malcolm Cowley published an autobiographical literary history, Exile's Return . The majority of Cowley's books were published after his seventieth birthday. The Dream of the Golden Mountains: Remembering the 1930s (memoirs), Viking, 1980.

In 1934 Malcolm Cowley published an autobiographical literary history, Exile's Return: A Narrative of Ideas, and established himself as an importan. He retired from writing in 1983, and from then on remained on the sidelines of literary study. His papers are housed at the Newberry Library, Chicago, and at Yale University. The View from Eighty (essay), Viking, 1980.

ISBN 10: 0140059199 ISBN 13: 9780140059199. Publisher: Penguin Books, 1981. We sell Rare, out-of-print, uncommon, & used BOOKS, PRINTS, MAPS, DOCUMENTS, AND EPHEMERA. We do not sell ebooks, print on demand, or other reproduced materials.

The following year he published an autobiography, The Dream of Golden Mountains (1934)

Hemingway removed direct reference to Cowley in a later version of The Snows of Kilimanjaro, replacing his name with the description, "that American poet with a pile of saucers in front of him and a stupid look on his potato face talking about the Dada movement". The following year he published an autobiography, The Dream of Golden Mountains (1934). In 1935 Cowley and other left-wing writers established the League of American Writers.

We sell Rare, out-of-print, uncommon, & used BOOKS, PRINTS, MAPS, DOCUMENTS, AND EPHEMERA. We do not sell ebooks, print on demand, or other reproduced materials. Each item you see here is individually described and imaged. We welcome further inquiries.

Comments

Keel Keel
Terrific read, in particular when it is read right after reading his previous book: Exiles' Return. It explains more effectively what those years must have been for those who live through them. I learnt a lot and succeeded in understanding better the dynamics of the great crisis. Better than many strictly economic explanation, because Cowley succeeds in depicting faitfully the distress, the hopelessness and how the Communist Myth offered for many the hope for a better future for mankind. But the dream proved to be an ilusion, an unattainable dream because human nature was ignored by the revolutionists.
The Apotheoses of Lacspor The Apotheoses of Lacspor
The author was a friend who wrote of his experiences in the literary world of the 1930's, including a chapter about the time he lived with my family..
Jediathain Jediathain
Like many literary expatriates of the early 20th century, Malcolm Cowley had a tendency to examine and re-examine his life. He started formalizing this process in his literary history of the 1920s, Exile's Return. Years later, he looked back on the 1930's in The Dream of the Golden Mountains. Taken together, these books show the shifts in thinking that were taking place in the first few decades of the 20th century. Moreover, we see the shifts in Cowley's own life and (importantly) self-identification - an important background for explaining the later Cowley who helped edit Kerouac's On the Road. Here is Cowley flirting with Communism, labor issues, and about everything else anti-thetical to the 1920's commitment to art and not much else. And while it doesn't have the strength of storytelling nor the mix of characters of Exile's Return, the work is interesting in its own right, if for no other reason than for Cowlye's clear perceptions of the issues of his day. Further, this is an important bridge to Cowley's later works and retrospects. As time moved on, Cowley became less literary and more historically and critically oriented. While he continued to produce occasional poems, producing two more editions of Blue Juniata, for example, it seems clear that Cowley was becoming less concerned with forging an identity (artistically) than determining and explaining how he fit into the present scenery. Thus, this book also serves as a mile-marker in the shifting identity of Mr. Cowley.