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eBook Surely You're Joking, Mr Feynman! ePub

eBook Surely You're Joking, Mr Feynman! ePub

by Richard Phillips Feynman,Raymond Todd

  • ISBN: 078611262X
  • Subcategory: Biography
  • Author: Richard Phillips Feynman,Raymond Todd
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Blackstone Pub; Unabridged edition (December 1, 1997)
  • ePub book: 1662 kb
  • Fb2 book: 1634 kb
  • Other: mbr txt mbr lrf
  • Rating: 4.9
  • Votes: 563

Description

by Richard Phillips Feynman (Author), Raymond Todd (Reader). Feynman's escapades are worthy of being read alou. aymond Todd seems to get as much pleasure out of the diversities of Feynman's career as the scientist did through living them.

by Richard Phillips Feynman (Author), Raymond Todd (Reader).

I have found each story by itself to be amusing, and the collect. Surely You’re Joking, Mr. Feynman! : Adventures of a Curious Character. by Richard P. Feynman. as told to Ralph Leighton. The stories in this book were collected intermittently and informally during seven years of very enjoyable drumming with Richard Feynman.

Start by marking "Surely You're Joking, Mr. Feynman!" . Richard Feynman, winner of the Nobel Prize in physics, thrived on outrageous adventures

Start by marking "Surely You're Joking, Mr. Feynman!": Adventures of a Curious Character as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. Richard Feynman, winner of the Nobel Prize in physics, thrived on outrageous adventures. Here he recounts in his inimitable voice his experience trading ideas on atomic physics with Einstein and Bohr and ideas on gambling with Nick the Greek; cracking the uncrackable safes guarding the most deeply held nuclear secrets; accompanying a ballet on his bongo drums; painting a naked female toreador.

by Richard Phillips Feynman (Author), Raymond Todd (Narrator). The book is divided into five parts corresponding to different parts of the author’s life. Within each part, the stories themselves are rarely more than half a dozen pages long, and none depend on the others

by Richard Phillips Feynman (Author), Raymond Todd (Narrator). Within each part, the stories themselves are rarely more than half a dozen pages long, and none depend on the others.

The book, released in 1985, covers a variety of instances in Feynman's life. The anecdotes in the. The anecdotes in the book are based on recorded audio conversations that Feynman had with his close friend and drumming partner Ralph Leighton.

I listened to Mr. Feynman’s memoir, Surely You’re Joking Mr. Feynman, as I drove for the last few weeks

I listened to Mr. Feynman, as I drove for the last few weeks. Although some aspects of the Nobel Prize winning physicist’s life were rather interesting, overall, I am surprised I stuck with his story for so long. Richard Feynman (1918-1988) certainly did have an interesting life, and his memoir captures some of the fascinating aspects of being a scientist: how he learned to repair radios as a teenagers by taking them apart; his interest in science from a young age versus his anti-social tendencies; his years working on the Manhattan project; his severe criticism of Brazil’s educational.

Читает Raymond Todd His outrageous exploits once shocked a Princeton dean's wife to exclaim: "Surely you're joking, Mr. Feynman!"

Мгновенный доступ к вашим любимым книгам без обязательной ежемесячной платы. Richard Feynman, one of the world's greatest theoretical physicists, thrived on adventure. His outrageous exploits once shocked a Princeton dean's wife to exclaim: "Surely you're joking, Mr. Feynman!" In this phenomenal national bestseller, Feynman recounts in his inimitable voice his experiences trading ideas on atomic physics with Einstein and Bohr and ideas on gambling with Nick the Greek, painting a naked female toreador, accompanying a ballet on his bongo drums, and much else of an eyebrow-raising and hilarious nature.

Surely you're joking mr. ark:/13960/t02018z14. Ocr. ABBYY FineReader 1. (Extended OCR).

With his characteristic eyebrow-raising behavior, Richard P. Feynman once provoked the wife of a Princeton dean to remark, "Surely you're joking, Mr. Feynman!" But the many scientific and personal achievements of this Nobel Prize-winning physicist are no laughing matter. In addition to solving the mystery of liquid helium, Feynman has been commissioned to paint a naked female toreador and asked to crack the uncrackable safes guarding the atomic bomb's most critical secrets.

The Nobel Prize-winning theoretical physicist talks about his adventure-filled life in a memoir based on a series of taped discussions.

Comments

Shakanos Shakanos
This is an extremely entertaining and often insightful collection by Nobel physicist Richard Feynman drawn from slices of his life experiences. Some might believe that the telling of a physicist’s life would be droll fare for anyone other than a fellow scientist, but in this instance, nothing could be further from the truth.

Dr. Feynman’s delight with life shines through everything--nothing gets him down for long. The reasons for this attitude are his ever-present compulsion to learn and discover, his urge to follow his insatiable curiosity (about everything!) wherever it might lead, his willingness to simply state whatever he thinks when asked, and his refusal to always take life so seriously. It is evident that Dr. Feynman has achieved what many can only dream of--living a meaningful and accomplished life while still being able to find absolute joy and fun in so much of how we spend that life.

It’s hard to imagine anyone that would not find this an interesting and enjoyable read. Although Dr. Feynman is a physicist, this is not a science book, and the reader really needs nothing in the way of a scientific background to fully enjoy it.

The book is divided into five parts corresponding to different parts of the author’s life. Within each part, the stories themselves are rarely more than half a dozen pages long, and none depend on the others. Although I read it cover-to-cover in order, it would be easy to open to any of the stories and read it independently. It is one of those books one could pick up when there are only a few minutes to read. But your experience may be like mine, and you may not want to put it down again!

Highly recommended for just about anyone!
Voodoogore Voodoogore
We are not often blessed with persons of the amazing intelligence of Richard Feynman. Even someone with just a smattering of science and math can appreciate this Nobel Prize winning, bongo drum playing, safe cracking denizen of the Manhattan Project at Los Alamos. Here was a man of superior intellect who could yet relate to the world around him and who had a curious interest in many facets of human endeavor. That is coupled with obvious tenderness toward his first wife, who dies of TB during the Manhattan Project. Even as Feynman writes about that in tightlipped fashion, his deep love for her and sorrow for the loss comes through.

The book is not tightly organized but it is smartly written. Guys like Einstein, Feynman, Carl Sagan will all wrestle from time to time with the non-scientific question of what preceded the Big Bang, if only by asking fleetingly if there is some principle of causation behind it all. Obviously I don't know if God exists or what it all means. But it is hard for me to think that such a towering intellect encased in such a lovely witty and wise person results from mere accident. I'll go no further.
Anarahuginn Anarahuginn
Feynman is a genius. The entire book is full of charming, intelligent, and surprisingly inspiring stories about the "curious character" that was the late, great Richard Feynman.

The last chapter is something else entirely: an entire philosophy and ethos of scientific thought rolled into a few pages. I found Feynman's principles and ideals for scientific integrity almost unbelievably precious: to never compromise on experimentation, to never make claims you can't back up with hard evidence, and most importantly, to never fool yourself into thinking that you're more right than you actually are.

Although only the scientifically or mathematically trained will understand much about Feynman's actual work, his life philosophy and its implications are something that everyone can benefit from. The world would be a better place if each of us tried to replicate just a little of his intellectual integrity. I almost didn't believe such beautiful, pure intellectual idealism wasn't possible until I read this book.
Makaitist Makaitist
Richard Feynman is the exact brand of aloof, irreverent, genius that the world needs, at any and every time.

This casual telling of myriad anecdotes from Feynman's life is precious and airy, even when dealing with early nuclear secrets, death, and other heavy topics.

If you're not sold on buying this book, be sure to watch several of the popular Richard Feynman videos on YouTube. This book is better than any of them. Enjoy.
Binar Binar
Very entertaining book. Feynman was famous for taking a fresh, original approach in physics; he was always re-inventing the ideas for himself by thinking them through profoundly, starting from fundamentals. He made great contributions and won the Nobel Prize in Physics. This book is not so much about physics, instead some humorous stories and adventures, which show his fresh, original approach to life. I admire his enthusiasm, his love for adventure, his sparkling personality, his honesty and the clarity of his thought, and his disdain for pretense. The anecdotes give much insight into why Feynman was such a great physicist. If you want learn about physics, with his original approach on full display, his best two books are the famous "Feynman Lectures on Physics" (undergraduate courses at Caltech) and "QED, the Strange Theory of Light and Matter".
Manarius Manarius
A strangely inspiring and provocative book. It's hard to put into words the power of this book. Feynman's personality comes through so strongly that you rage against stupid bureaucrats, you see what it means to be an original thinker uninhibited by orthodoxy, you see one of the best explanations of the difference between genuine science and "cargo cult science" as Feynman calls it. You see one of the best explanations for why the California education system has such troubles, when you read his account of reviewing textbooks for the state. Somehow this book inspires you to be smarter, to be more original, and to be more intellectually honest.