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eBook Building Oracle XML Applications ePub

eBook Building Oracle XML Applications ePub

by Steve Muench

  • ISBN: 1565926919
  • Category: Databases and Big Data
  • Subcategory: Computers
  • Author: Steve Muench
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: O'Reilly Media (October 12, 2000)
  • Pages: 812
  • ePub book: 1619 kb
  • Fb2 book: 1400 kb
  • Other: azw txt rtf lit
  • Rating: 4.1
  • Votes: 510

Description

Building Oracle XML Applications introduces XML, gives an overview of Oracle XML technologies, and shows what they . Steve Muench is Oracle's lead XML Technical Evangelist and development lead for Oracle XSQL Pages

Building Oracle XML Applications introduces XML, gives an overview of Oracle XML technologies, and shows what they do and how they fit together. Steve Muench is Oracle's lead XML Technical Evangelist and development lead for Oracle XSQL Pages. He is Oracle's primary representative to the W3C XSL Working Group, as well as a consulting product manager and developer working on Oracle Business Components for Java-an XML-based business object framework.

The book shows how to combine the power of XML and XSLT with the speed, functionality, and reliability of the Oracle database to build flexible applications. The author delivers nearly 800 pages of entertaining text, helpful and time-saving hints, and extensive examples that developers can put to use immediately to build custom XML applications.

J2ee And XML Development. Mastering XMI Java Programming With XMI XML And UML. 5G Explained, Security and Deployment of Advanced Mobile Communications by Jyrki . Java And XML Data Binding.

His book is second to none with regard to explaining Java-Oracle-XML because (1) he provides deep and . First, I must say, when I picked this book a few weeks ago, I already was working with XML/Oracle/Etc for almost a year.

Consequently he becomes an ambassador from any of these camps to any of the others. The book shelves are crowded with XML, Java and Oracle books that dabble in the nexus of these technologies - applications.

Building Oracle XML Applications. Building Oracle XML Applications. Books for People with Print Disabilities. Internet Archive Books.

Building Oracle XML Applications" gives Java and PL/SQL developers a detailed look at the many tools Oracle has provided to support XML development, such as the Oracle XML Parser, the Oracle XML SQL Utility, and the XSQL Servlet. This book shows how to combine the power of XML and XSLT with the speed, functionality, and reliability of the Oracle database to build flexible applications.

Building Oracle XML Applications book. Details (if other): Cancel.

Building Oracle XML Applications, Steve Muench, O'Reilly. XML Bible, Elliotte Rusty Harold, IDG Books Worldwide. Building XML Applications, S. aurent and Cerami, McGraw-Hill. XML Unleashed, Morrison et a. SAMS. Building Web Sites with XML, Michael Floyd, Prentice Hall PTR. Building Corporate Portals with XML, Finkelstein and Aiken, McGraw-Hill. org/TR lists W3C technical reports. org/xml is the W3C XML activity overview page.

Building Oracle XML Applications gives Java and PL/SQL developers a rich and detailed look at the many tools Oracle provides to support XML development. It shows how to combine the power of XML and XSLT with the speed, functionality, and reliability of the Oracle database. It’s a book for Oracle developers by an Oracle developer who has lived the technology at Oracle Corporation for over ten years and has directly catalyzed the company’s XML technology direction and implementation.

Building Oracle XML Applications by Steve Muench. Whether you want to just work with XML and XSL files or you are a hardcore Java or PL/SQL developer, you’ll find that JDeveloper . has lots of features to make your life easier. Stay ahead with the world's most comprehensive technology and business learning platform. With Safari, you learn the way you learn best. Auto-indenting and block indent/unindent to keep XML looking nice.

This rich and detailed look at the many Oracle tools that support XML development shows Java and PL/SQL developers how to combine the power of XML and XSLT with the speed, functionality, and reliability of the Oracle database. The nearly 800 pages of entertaining text, helpful and time-saving hints, and extensive examples can be put to use immediately to build custom XML applications. Includes a CD-ROM with JDeveloper 3.1, an integrated development environment for Java developers.

Comments

MarF MarF
This book is great. I already had some understanding of XML and related technologies, but needed to figure-out how to solve certain problems.
This book demonstrates a variety of approaches to get an XML document into a database. I haven't read the book cover-to-cover, but have used it for the purpose of problem solving. This book is not a reference, but contains solutions.
Any...can learn a syntax or a tools definition. This book goes beyond that.
Knights from Bernin Knights from Bernin
Unless you're still running 7 or 8i, I can't recommend this book. As another reviewer noted, Oracle has added a lot of XML features in 9i and 10g. The content itself is great -- the authors should consider a second edition that covers the current Oracle XML features.
Kann Kann
Finally, a comprehensive guide to Oracle 8i's support for XML. Excellent examples, clear and yet complete narrative as is customarily found in the O'Reilly series. Also includes the best overview of the XML standard that I've read. The sections on the interMedia extensions were great. Highly recommended.
Dellevar Dellevar
and you won't find any information on it, rest is , best xml book you can get covering oracle.
GEL GEL
Finally!
You've heard the one about the IT manager and the CEO, the punch line reading something like "the information you've given me is technically accurate but totally useless"? This is exactly how I was beginning to feel about Oracle's XML documentation (primarily on TechNet) -- tons of what I needed, with no degree of coherency or focus to task.
I eventually gave up on wading through countless Oracle URLs and READMEs and simply decided to wait for the release of Steve Muench's book. I'm glad I did.
Steve takes us on a journey of well-documented *examples* that explain the "why" and "how" of the Oracle XML API, not just the "what". Especially good is Chapter 5, the PL/SQL XML API - great for long-time Oracle dweebs that have yet to polish up on Java.
I have few criticisms - I had hoped to see an electronic version of the examples on the included CD (any maybe they're there but they were not immediately apparent). I also recently purchased O'Reilly's XML Pocket Quick Reference - it does a bit better job at concisely explaining XML and XSL syntax. Rather than dis Muench's effort, I prefer to believe that the Quick Ref is an essential companion to this otherwise stellar find.
If you plan to "do XML" with Oracle, you MUST BUY THIS BOOK, period. 'Nuff said.
Hidden Winter Hidden Winter
First, I must say, when I picked this book a few weeks ago, I already was working with XML/Oracle/Etc for almost a year. At the time the variety of books in the market was very limited (I had to learn XSLT from a site in the Czecz republic because no book offered a decent coverage!). So, I picked this book to see what I had missed, and what I was doing perhaps not in the best way. This book was everything that I expected and more. It covers *a lot* of material, XML, XML Storage (How to use Oracle Clobs, for example), XPATH, XSLT and more - the authors don't cut corners, they explain everything thoroughly, and that's why the book takes more than 700 pages. The examples are excellent - concise and right to the point. The material is written in a clear and comprehensive way. Usually programming books take a lot out of me - but not this one! I thought I knew a lot about XML, but I learned much I didn't know from this book. To summarize, this is how a programming book should be! Simply above and beyond the call of duty. I also think it would be useful for people which intend to use XML with databases other than Oracle.
Zainian Zainian
This is an excellent book for developers wishing to use XML with Oracle and Java, C++, or PL/SQL. I agree with the other reviews posted here previously about the book's coverage and strengths. The one thing I would like to see more of in this book is coverage of Oracle's handling of XML Schema, since XML Schema appears to be the eventual replacement of DTDs.
The book is great for beginners since the author starts the book and individual chapters with basics, but it is useful as a reference since the author handles many of the complexities that more experienced developers will eventually run into when using Oracle and XML together.
The included CD-ROM does not include the fabulous examples (it features JDeveloper 3.1 for Windows/NT) in the book, but these examples can be downloaded from the O'Reilly site (referenced in book's preface, pg. xiii).
While there are excellent chapters focusing primarily on XML, the real beneficiaries of this book are people who need to integrate XML with Oracle and a programming language such as Java. Not only has reading this book increased my knowledge about integrating Java, Oracle, and XML, but it has also provided me with working code that I can start using in my applications.
So you've made the decision to tackle your next big IT project with a powerful threesome: Java, Oracle, and XML. Then this the book for you. I echo the comments of another reader who found wading through technet.Oracle.com's assorted tutorials and scattered documentation frustrating -- this book puts it all together in one place.
Though Java isn't in the book's title - it probably should be. I found chapter six, "Processing XML with Java", to be the most comprehensive and valuable chapter in the book. The author describes and builds a set of Java applications for storing XML as CLOB objects on the server, importing (via parsing and JDBC) XML documents into a relational schema, and its complement, exporting query results into XML, among other things. I also found running and working with the source code examples (downloadable at oreilly) to be a learning tool.
One caveat is that this book should be used as a starting point -- not a final reference -- for using XML with Java and Oracle. The pace of development with XML means that some of the classes the author used, like those from SAX 1.0, are already deprecated. But after reading this book, and working through the examples, picking up the the new stuff shouldn't be hard.