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eBook How the Web was Born: The Story of the World Wide Web ePub

eBook How the Web was Born: The Story of the World Wide Web ePub

by Robert Cailliau,James Gillies

  • ISBN: 0192862073
  • Category: Networking and Cloud Computing
  • Subcategory: Computers
  • Author: Robert Cailliau,James Gillies
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Oxford University Press (January 15, 2000)
  • Pages: 372
  • ePub book: 1656 kb
  • Fb2 book: 1490 kb
  • Other: mobi azw doc lit
  • Rating: 4.4
  • Votes: 639

Description

Robert Cailliau is Head of the Web office at CERN, and one of the pioneers of the World Wide Web. Библиографические данные.

This compelling and highly topical book is certain to interest all general readers with a taste for the Web or the Internet, as well as students and teachers of computing, technology, and applied science. Robert Cailliau is Head of the Web office at CERN, and one of the pioneers of the World Wide Web. How the Web was Born: The Story of the World Wide Web Oxford paperback reference Popular science.

Few people, however, realize that the Web was born at CERN, the .

Few people, however, realize that the Web was born at CERN, the European Laboratory for Particle Physics in Geneva, and that it was invented by an Englishman, Tim Berners-Lee. Offering its readers an unprecedented "insider's" perspective, this new book was co-written by two CERN employees-one of whom, Robert Cailliau, was among the Web's pioneers.

James Gillies (AUTHOR) Robert Cailliau (AUTHOR). Internet History World Wide Web History CERN Accelerator School.

How the web was born the story of the World Wide Web. Author(S). James Gillies (AUTHOR) Robert Cailliau (AUTHOR). Oxford: Oxford University Press.

The Story of the World Wide Web. James Gillies and Robert Cailliau. In 1994 a computer program called the Mosaic browser transformed the Internet from an academic tool into a telecommunications revolution. Now a household name, the World Wide Web is part of the modern communications landscape with tens of thousands of servers providing information to millions of users. Few people, however, realize that the Web was born at CERN, the European Laboratory for Particle Physics, in Geneva, and that it was invented by an Englishman, Tim Berners-Lee.

James Gillies and Robert Cailliau Oxford University Press: Oxford 2000 . The story is presented over eight chapters and an epilogue.

North America and Europe continues to adopt and integrate the Internet as a feature of mainstream life.

Robert Cailliau, James Gillies. Prologue 1. the foundations 2. setting the scene at cern 3. enquire within upon everything 4. false beginnings 5. so what are we going to call this thing? 6. the next step 7. going public 8. fleeing the nest 9. IT's official epilogue index. View PDF. Save to Library.

The story is told from widely varying viewpoints and across shifting timelines as the various players are introduced and observed; this adds some complexity to the narrative, but yields a truer picture of the team efforts required to devise and launch the Web.

Robert Cailliau in 2019. Robert Cailliau (born 26 January 1947) is a Belgian informatics engineer, computer scientist and author who proposed the first (pre-www) hypertext system for CERN in 1987 and collaborated with Tim Berners-Lee on the World Wide Web from before it got its name. He designed the historical logo of the WWW, organized the first International World Wide Web Conference at CERN in 1994 and helped transfer Web development from CERN to the global Web consortium in 1995.

Now a household name, the World Wide Web is a prominent fixture in the modern communications landscape .

The Physician Gillies and computation scientific Cailliau gives us an impressive recount, without technical lexicon, about how the actual Web spouted since a Physics lab in Geneva environs.

How the Web Was Born: The Story of the World Wide Web, James Gillies, Robert Cailliau (2000). ACM Software System Award (with Tim Berners-Lee). Christophe Plantin Prize, Antwerp. Médaille Genève Reconnaissante (with Tim Berners-Lee). Honorary citizenship of the city of Tongeren. Gold Medal of the Flemish Academy of Sciences and the Arts. Dr. Hon. University of Liège (with Tim Berners-Lee). Ehrenpreis Best of Swiss Web. Internet Hall of Fame by the Internet Society.

In 1994, a computer program called the Mosaic browser transformed the Internet from an academic tool into a telecommunications revolution. Now a household name, the World Wide Web is a prominent fixture in the modern communications landscape, with tens of thousands of servers providing information to millions of users. Few people, however, realize that the Web was born at CERN, the European Laboratory for Particle Physics in Geneva, and that it was invented by an Englishman, Tim Berners-Lee. Offering its readers an unprecedented "insider's" perspective, this new book was co-written by two CERN employees--one of whom, Robert Cailliau, was among the Web's pioneers. It tells how the idea for the Web came about at CERN, how it was developed, and how it was eventually handed over at no charge for the rest of the world to use. The first book-length account of the Web's development, How the Web was Born draws upon several interviews with the key players in this amazing story. This compelling and highly topical book is certain to interest all general readers with a taste for the Web or the Internet, as well as students and teachers of computing, technology, and applied science.

Comments

Maveri Maveri
The book is a fine discussion of the history of the development of the World Wide Web from the 1950's to the 1990's by someone who was critical to the effort from the CERN side. The CERN perspective, and as noted elsewhere here, the politics, are part of the story and I do not believe detract from it. The culture of innovation and development - both the engineering and the policy - are covered. This is a first hand account of what has been the development of the greatest change in the world economy since the automobile, and bears reading. While not a riveting page turner, it is a valuable and interesting look at the recent history of one of our lifetime's greatest developments.
Voodoosida Voodoosida
HTWWB is a detailed look at what brought us to where the Web was at the end of the last century. There is a good (although not as good as Where Wizards Stay Up Late) description of how the Internet itself came to be, and then it goes into the whole set of precursors to what Tim Berners-Lee invented at CERN, which became the Web.

The book is notable for really digging back into the precursors of the Web. I've been in networking since 1979 and there were a lot of new things for me to learn in the book.

The book is weak where it over invests in the politics at CERN and especially around the horse-trading that resulted in the consortia that manages the Web, W3C. The last fifty pages of what been an engrossing read just drag and drag.

I'd give the first two thirds of the book at least four stars, the last third two at best. Still, if you're really interested in how things like URL, HTTP, HTML, DNS, etc came about, this is worth making the effort.
Unsoo Unsoo
The last in a series of technology books which I have just read ( the others were `Where Wizards stay up late' and `The Triumph of the Ethernet'), this describes the World Wide Web and how it originated. For a start the Web is not the Internet and if you can see the difference between the two, then the book gets very clear. The Web was created as one communications service which could use the internet, by a group in CERN ( a nuclear research facility) in Switzerland.
Tim Berners-Lee came up with the original idea and had the vision and tenacity to push it forward. This book goes back to the origins of the internet - eg. the ARPANET in the US and various other efforts in Europe to lay the ground work for the Web story. One thing about the backround was the fact that the French internet development effort `Cyclades', initially had more flexibility - allowing software addressing, than ARPANET, however, ultimately the European efforts could not maintain the momentum of the US efforts by virtue of their complex funding and management structures. The US efforts evolved faster, addressing mainly of its initial short comings and gained widespread acceptance.
Another indicator, mentioned in the book, of the relative speeds of European vs US development efforts is indicated in the battle for acceptance of TCP/IP vs. OSI standards for computer intercommunication. OSI is an international standards development organisation, and on the face of it, an international communications standard - even if developed slowly - must triumph over de-facto standards. However the pace of OSI development was glacial, and TCP/IP worked and continued to work as the internet grew and grew. Eventually TCP/IP gained such widespread acceptance that it was impossible to ignore.
The pattern repeated itself with the Web - developed in Europe, the first web sites were all European, it was taken up enthusiastically by various US-based software engineers. As Berners-Lee was so short staffed, he appealed to volunteers to write browsers for various types of computers - and Marc Anderson in Illonois' National Centre for Supercomputer Applications, wrote a browser (called Mosaic) which was suitable for personal computers. The book makes clear the Anderson's team worked frenetically, but the code design was viewed as very poor by the CERN team [ they described it as MarcA mode, i.e. buggy]. However the browser launched the World Wide Web to mass appeal and changed the world.
The book briefly describes how Berners-Lee saw the need of a forum to control the development of the Web and could only find practical support for this in the US (at MIT), - despite repeated appeals for funding from various European sources, again a missed opportunity for Europe.
The book has a failing in being too deferential to Berners-Lee (it is co-authored by one of his co-workers in the development effort) but it is an essential read from a European perspective on how the US has the ability, the resources and the ability to recognize and develop innovations
Armin Armin
OK, so I'm used to reviewing books of a more technical nature ;)
This account of the beginning of the web is both entertaining and informative. I highly recommend it to anybody whose introduction to computer science has been the web: this book will fill in a lot of the gaps about the origins of all sorts of topics ,such as hypertext and networking.
I find it interesting that the authors did not always take a linear approach to their subject. Several chapters concentrated on a particular sub-topic, bringing it forward from its root in the fifties or sixties or even earlier, all the way through the nineties.
Then the next chapter would likewise deal with a different but related sub-topic. I found this non-linear approach to be much like the World Wide Web itself. Considering one of the authors was intimately involved with the birth of the Web, I wouldn't be surprised if the book were intended to flow this way....it makes it so that you could conceivably jump around from chapter, just like jumping from hyperlink to hyperlink....
This book might also make good reading for people who are close to web geeks, but aren't geeks themselves. As long as they are intelligent enough to understand computing concepts, it will help explain to them what this fascination of ours is all about. Hey, it may even get THEM interested ;)
Fearlesshunter Fearlesshunter
The Physician Gillies and computation scientific Cailliau gives us an impressive recount, without technical lexicon, about how the actual Web spouted since a Physics lab in Geneva environs.

All the implications generated by this colossal invention, including the whole change of paradigms and profound transformations in our quotidian lives are described with notable erudition and precision.

Once you have started it will be too hard to leave this passionate reading.
Saberblade Saberblade
This is a good book, though I personally think that "Where Wizards stay up late" was a much better read and well laid out than this one. But never the less, this is a very good text on web history.