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eBook Networks for Research and Education: Sharing of Computer and Information Resources Nationwide ePub

eBook Networks for Research and Education: Sharing of Computer and Information Resources Nationwide ePub

by Martin Greenberger,Julius Aronofsky,James L. McKenney,William F. Massy

  • ISBN: 026207057X
  • Category: Networking and Cloud Computing
  • Subcategory: Computers
  • Author: Martin Greenberger,Julius Aronofsky,James L. McKenney,William F. Massy
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: The MIT Press (April 15, 1974)
  • Pages: 433
  • ePub book: 1229 kb
  • Fb2 book: 1512 kb
  • Other: mobi txt doc docx
  • Rating: 4.6
  • Votes: 343

Description

Sharing of Computer and Information Resources Nationwide

Sharing of Computer and Information Resources Nationwide. Advancing technology is beginning to change this situation by permitting the importing and exporting of services, thereby providing the user with more options and calling for a different kind of computer center/user relationship.

Computer and Information Networks

Computer and Information Networks. Martin Greenberger1, Julius Aronofsky2, James L. McKenney3, William F. Massy4. 1Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland. Articulation of the possibilities of computer networks goes back to the early 1960's and before, and working networks have been in evidence for several years now, both commercially and in universities. The visionary and promotional phases of computer networks are over. It is time for hard-nosed comparative analysis (16).

Greenberger, Martin, Julius Aronofsky, James L. McKenney, and William F. Massy, eds. 1974. Cambridge: MIT Press. No Author Given F/E 5 The Lottery (London: J. Watts. Watts ), 20-25.

Sharing of Computer and Information Resources Nationwide.

Martin Greenberger, Julius Aronofsky, James L. Massy 1974

Martin Greenberger, Julius Aronofsky, James L. Massy 1974. Advancing technology is beginning to change this situation by permitting the importing and exporting of services, thereby providing the user with more options and calling for a different kind of computer center/user relationship

The most basic conclusion coming out of the EDUCOM seminars is that computer networking must be acknowledged as an important new mode for obtaining information and computation (15). It is a real alternative that needs to be given serious attention in current planning and decision-making.

Cambridge: MIT Press. Institution or Organization as "Author" PR (American Library Association 1978, 25) RL American Library Association, Young Adult Services Division, Services Statement Development Committee. Secondary Source of Quotation PR (Barthes 1968) RL Barthes, Roland. La mort de l'auteur" (The death of the author). Manteia, vol. 5. Translated by Stephen Heath in Image/music/text. New York: Hill and Wang, 1977, 147. Quoted in Wayne C. Booth.

3. Bernstein, H. L. C. Andrews, H. M. Berman, F. Bernstein, G. H. Campbell, H. Carrell, H. B. Chiang, W. Hamilton, D. D. Jones, D. Klunk, T. F. Koetzle, E. Meyer, C. N. Morimoto, S. S. Sevian, R. K. Stodola, M. Strongson and T. V. Willoughby. No Author Given 5 The Lottery (London: J. Watts ), The Lottery.

The approximately 7,000 computers in the United States that process information for research and education are not, as one might expect, concentrated or linked in integrated operations but for the most part are scattered, autonomous, and separated. Advancing technology is beginning to change this situation by permitting the importing and exporting of services, thereby providing the user with more options and calling for a different kind of computer center/user relationship. Financial strains in research and educational institutions are accelerating the changes. One of the conclusions of this study is that networks—most generally, connections between unlike computers running under unlike operating systems across great distances—are here to stay; networks are practical and deserve the serious attention of any institution considering how or whether to replace its main computer. The book grew out of and contains the papers, discussions, and analyses of three seminars conducted in late 1972 and early 1973 by EDUCOM with the support of the National Science Foundation. It identifies the central issues—which tend to be political, economic, and managerial rather than technological—involved in building and operating networks on a national basis. A number of informed specialists both within and outside the computer and communications field have arrived at conclusions and made recommendations that are essential to the important decisions being made today—and to decisions that will be made in the future—pertaining not only to network developments but also more generally to the selection and configuration of computing and communication activities within research and education on a national level. Networks for Research and Education is addressed to anyone with an interest in the possibilities and problems of networking, irrespective of background or occupation: potential users, suppliers, and especially decision makers and their staffs, including state legislators, government officials, and administrative officers of colleges, universities, and other institutions involved in research and education.