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eBook The New Turing Omnibus: Sixty-Six Excursions in Computer Science ePub

eBook The New Turing Omnibus: Sixty-Six Excursions in Computer Science ePub

by A. K. Dewdney

  • ISBN: 0805071660
  • Category: Networking and Cloud Computing
  • Subcategory: Computers
  • Author: A. K. Dewdney
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Holt Paperbacks; Enlarged, Enlarged and Updated Editon edition (July 15, 1993)
  • Pages: 480
  • ePub book: 1756 kb
  • Fb2 book: 1122 kb
  • Other: doc lrf lrf rtf
  • Rating: 4.5
  • Votes: 728

Description

The New Turing Omnibus book. Updated and expanded, The Turing Omnibus offers 66 concise, brilliantly written articles on the major points of interest in computer science theory, technology, and applications

The New Turing Omnibus book. Updated and expanded, The Turing Omnibus offers 66 concise, brilliantly written articles on the major points of interest in computer science theory, technology, and applications.

Updated and expanded, "The New Turing Omnibus" offers 66 concise articles on the major points of interest in computer science theory . One person found this helpful.

Updated and expanded, "The New Turing Omnibus" offers 66 concise articles on the major points of interest in computer science theory, technology and applications.

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Computer Science Books. an introduction to the realm of computer science as A. K. Dewdney's The Turing Omnibus. This button opens a dialog that displays additional images for this product with the option to zoom in or out. Report incorrect product info or prohibited items. The New Turing Omnibus : Sixty-Six Excursions in Computer Science. For everyone from the curious beginner to the working professional, The New Turing Omnibus offers 66 concise, brilliantly written mathematically oriented articles on the major points of interest in computer science theory, technology, and applications.

K. New for this tour: updated information on algorithms, detecting primes, noncomputable functions, and self-replicating computers-plus completely new sections on the Mandelbrot set, genetic algorithms, the Newton-Raphson Method, neural networks that learn, DOS systems for personal computers, and computer viruses.

The New Turing Omnibus: Sixty-Six Excursions in Computer Science (1993 book). I found a German version of the book with just a single query. I hope you find the exact version you’re looking for. Addition: What are some alternatives to library. nu? Do check some books sites from the list. If you don’t find English, you might want to consider using a translator. Where can I download The Contract in PDF? Where can I get the PDF of a book called "Systems programming" by Leland L. Beck?

No other volume provides as broad, as thorough, or as accessible an introduction to the realm of computer science as A. K. Dewdney's The Turing Omnibus.

For everyone from the curious beginner to the working professional, The New Turing Omnibus offers 66 concise, brilliantly written mathematically oriented articles on the major points of interest in computer science theory, technology, and applications. Foundational for this tour: information on algorithms, detecting primes, noncomputable functions, and self-replicating computers--plus fundamental sections on the Mandelbrot set, genetic algorithms, the Newton-Raphson Method, neural networks that learn, DOS systems for personal computers, and computer viruses.

Comments

Browelali Browelali
This is the best bathroom reading book I've ever found. Even after a tech heavy high school career and 4 years of CS in college, no one thought I needed to know physical heuristics to NP algorithms or 10 lines of code needed to display a fractal, etc.

Really love this book, highly recommended. Some essays are easy and can be casually cruised through in 5 minutes, others are very tech heavy and you'll need external research books to be able to get through the barely explained equations (esp. Art of Computer Programming), but they are all very interesting to learn about.
Dalarin Dalarin
What you get out of the book depends upon how much you want to put into in. A reader of this book, could decide to just understand the general ideas, follow the detailed mathematics, or perhaps program on a computer (for example sorting routines, hashing and the like). Each of the excursions is well covered, sometimes witty, but at times I got bogged-down in the symbols. The chapter on "analog computation" coming in the middle of a book was a welcome relief presenting ideas of sorting, shortest path and minimum trees using spaghetti and strings without mathematics (and would be a good chapter to give to non-computer science friends if they ever make the mistake of asking you what sort of problems you think about). The chapter on neural networks, I thought was also clear. There are also some of the classic computer science problems presented such as the Tower of Hanoi, or "A man ponders how to ferry a wolf, a goat, and a cabbage across of river".

The 66 excursions cover a lot of ground, but often return to Turing machines, finite-state machines, and NP-completeness problems. I might have enjoyed more on algorithm analysis, computer languages, and game analysis. Additionally there are new topics since this 1992 publication, such as quantum computing, Bioinformatics, Internet related topics on virus and encrypting, and a raft of social questions including privacy. I hope the "Turing omnibus" refuels for another update.
Nuadazius Nuadazius
If, as according to A. K. Dewdney, "W. Rouse Bell (was) the great English writer on mathematical recreations" then
Dewdney is the greatest Canadian writer.
Period.
Frei Frei
If you are interested in Computer Science, reading this book is like watching a "Best Of" from your favorite TV show. It has a a 3-5 page headline on 66 different topics (with references, a must-have for academics) written so that anyone can understand the general idea without any background in the area being described.
Terr Terr
Excellent book. Covers math and computer science concepts in a practical and fun way.
Gadar Gadar
An excellent book by a man who knows his subject.
FLIDER FLIDER
There are some interesting tidbits here, but you have to wade through a lot to get to them. Also, it is obvious the book is just a bunch of articles pasted together, and there is not rhyme nor reason as to their order. I found some interesting algorithms, but the writing itself and explanations are bland and at times quite confusing to me who has worked as a software developer in the IT industry for 20 years. Many of these also feel outdated. If it were cleaned up, updated and explanations made more clear then the book might be worth the money, until then, try Code by Charles Petzold, you'll get a lot more from that book.
This book has a lot of promise, and the premise is a good one: providing capsule overviews of 66 different areas of Computer Science. Unfortunately the delivery ends up disappointing.

I was hoping for short, but complete, overview of a number of topics. Something I could share with my teenagers to try and spark an interest in computer science (given that when I was their age to use a computer you had no choice but to dive in and understand how the machine worked, so it was a giant puzzle which begged to be solved). However, to keep the subject count high and the page count within reason, it feels like some necessary detail was left out, making it much harder to fully grasp or appreciate the content of each chapter.

For example, Chapter 3 (Systems of Logic) starts off easily enough but quickly jumps off to complete bases, relying on the reader to fill in gaps that they may be unable to do without having more information available. Figure 3.1, "Structure of the complete bases" would benefit from more exposition. Certainly my 14 year old had trouble making sense of the diagram.

In rereading the author's introduction, it is clear that he does not intend this book to stand on its own. I feel, however, that it would be more useful for autodidacts to pull ten or so of the excursions and add more sites to the remainder.