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eBook Software Testing Techniques ePub

eBook Software Testing Techniques ePub

by Boris Beizer

  • ISBN: 0442206720
  • Category: Programming
  • Subcategory: Computers
  • Author: Boris Beizer
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Van Nostrand Reinhold; 2 edition (June 1, 1990)
  • Pages: 550
  • ePub book: 1460 kb
  • Fb2 book: 1512 kb
  • Other: lit txt doc mbr
  • Rating: 4.5
  • Votes: 644

Description

Ships from and sold by daytonbooks2.

See if your friends have read any of Boris Beizer's books. Boris Beizer’s Followers (1). Boris Beizer. in Brussels, Belgium.

Software Testing Techniques by Boris Beizer is an absolute must for anyone who has a serious interest in software testing. 31 people found this helpful.

This book concerns testing techniques that are applied to individual routines. Reprinted with permission of Van Nostrand Reinhold, New York

This book concerns testing techniques that are applied to individual routines. The companion volume, Software System Testing and Quality Assurance, is concerned with integration testing, development of system test plans, software quality management, test teams, and software reliability. Most software is produced by the cooperative effort of many designers and programmers working over a period of years. Reprinted with permission of Van Nostrand Reinhold, New York. EXPLANATION AND NOTATION-This document is a taxonomy for bugs.

The best book I have read on software testing. The techniques in this book have served me well on many projects. The techniques are platform and technology independent. Just pure software engineering. It's a must for software quality control professionals. Download (chm, . 5 Mb).

Software Testing Techniques book. Details (if other): Cancel.

Dreamtech, 2003 - Computer software - 550 pages.

Author: Boris Beizer. The majority of Software Testing Techniques takes the reader through the various types of models that the tester can use to describe the system under test and then the various techniques that the tester can apply to those models

Author: Boris Beizer. I remember reading this book early in my University career and being particularly struck by the discrepancy between what I was being taught about testing on the course and what was being presented to me by this book. This book made testing seem like a technical discipline with a lot of very strong techniques. The majority of Software Testing Techniques takes the reader through the various types of models that the tester can use to describe the system under test and then the various techniques that the tester can apply to those models. The models increase in complexity and the reader carries through the skills and understanding from one model to the next.

Boris Beizer was an American software engineer and author. degree in physics from the City College of New York in 1956, an MS in Electrical Engineering (1963) and a PhD in computer science from the University of Pennsylvania in 1966. He wrote many books and articles on topics such as system architecture and software testing. His books Software Testing Techniques and Software System Testing and Quality Assurance are frequently consulted references on the subject.

text on Software QC

Comments

Aver Aver
The absolute best QA testing preparation book on the market.
Xellerlu Xellerlu
This book is academic in the best possible sense. The heavy artillery. You can make a career out of the stuff this book contains.

Not a book for beginners but certainly something someone with an introduction to the art will want to read.
Kalv Kalv
Every professional and commercial software development organization spends a great deal of time in the testing and validation of their software. The testing process, driven either by legal or financial requirements, can be expensive and may thwart the planned deployment of the application. Many studies indicate that the testing process can even take three times as long as the actual coding itself. Indeed, software development done under the ISO 9000 or FDA auspices can be extremely time intensive.
This book gives a lengthy and fairly comprehensive overview of software testing that emphasizes formal models for testing. In the introduction, the author gives a general overview of the testing process and the reasons and goals for testing. He carefully distinguishes between testing and debugging, and advocates these as separate activities. Testing according to the author is done to find bugs; whereas debugging is done to find the origin of the bugs and fix them. The author characterizes testing as either functional or structural. Functional testing treats the program from the user's point of view, with inputs given to the program, and then the outputs are checked for conformance to a specified reference. Structural testing examines how the program is implemented, in terms of programming style, design, etc. The notion of an oracle is defined as any program or process that specifies the expected outcome of a collection of tests. The author clearly identifies and characterizes the different types of tests that arise in development organizations, such as unit testing, regression testing, stress testing, and integration testing.
In chapter 2, the author classifies the different types of bugs that could arise in program development. Bugs are classified according to functional, structural, data, coding, system, and design and test bugs. He stresses the need to not have a religious attitude about bugs, namely that all software will have them to some degree, and therefore it is the quality measure of the software that is important in deploying the application. If a minor bug requires a major software rewrite for example, it would not be advantageous to fix this bug.
Chapter 3 takes up the notion of path testing, which, according to the author, is based on the use of the program's flow control. The tester selects a set of test paths through the program with the goal of executing every statement and branch of the program at least once. The author summarizes well the flowgraph and process block techniques used to implement path testing.
In chapter 4, the author introduces the concept of a transaction flow as a representation of a system's processing. The flowgraphs developed in chapter 3 are used here to create a transaction flowgraph for functional testing. The transaction flow representation gives a way to model the system's behavior. The author's treatment here is very detailed, and he gives several useful tips on how to conduct this kind of testing.
The next chapter covers the topic of data-flow testing, where again flowgraphs are used, but this time the focus is on exploring the things that can happen to data. Data objects should be initialized prior to program execution, and selecting paths to insure this is the goal of data testing. The author does a good job of defining and characterizing data anomalies, and the strategies employed in static and dynamic anomaly detection. This is followed by a good overview of domain testing in chapter 6. This kind of testing, more mathematical in nature than others, attempts to test whether the inputs to programs are fulfilling some prior classification or specification. The author uses concepts from vector spaces and convex geometry to describe domain testing.
In chapter 7, several attempts are discussed to quantify program complexity, such as Halstead's metrics and token counts. This chapter is somewhat more theoretical at first glance, but a lot of these ideas have found practical application in development, particularly the measures for subroutine nesting. This is followed in the next two chapters by more abstract discussion involving paths, regular expression, and syntax testing. The discussion however is useful, for it trains the reader about how to think about a program in more general, linguistic terms. Such thinking is always useful when attempting to show a particular program is acting in ways other than that which it was designed for.
Logic-based testing, via Boolean algebra, is the topic of chapter 10. The author uses Karnaugh-Veitch charts to reduce the algebraic manipulations to a useful graphical representation. Finite-state machines, so useful in all areas of software engineering, are the topic of chapter 11. The concepts are presented very effectively by the author, and the reader should take away an appreciation of how these constructions are employed in software testing.
The next chapter reads like one straight out of a book on discrete geometry, wherein graph matrices are employed to give matrix representations in software. Linked lists are used to represent the graphs in a computer, and it is shown how testing problems can be represented as a graph problem.
The last chapter discusses how to implement software testing based on the strategies discussed in the book. The three-phase test scenario is described, namely unit, integration, and system testing. An overview of commercial testing tools is also given, with CASE mentioned, but the author chooses not to review the actual packages, citing the dynamic nature of the commercial situation. However he does give a useful discussion of the different characteristics of current testing tools.
Gir Gir
Software Testing Techniques by Boris Beizer is an absolute
must for anyone who has a serious interest in software
testing. This 549-page book covers nearly every aspect of
the process of finding errors in computer programs, moving
from basic definitions and terminology through detailed and
easy-to-understand explanations of most testing strategies
in use today, finishing with a chapter on implementing
testing strategies in a development organization.

This book is written with the practitioner in mind, but
can equally well be used by students in software engineering
curriculums. It presents both theory and practice in a
thorough and clear manner, illustrating both concepts
and practical techinqes with numerous realistic examples.

All in all, in this reviewers mind, this is a very good
book on software testing, in particular for the active
practicioner, but could definitely be used by students of
software engineering.
Enone Enone
The best book I have read on software testing. The techniques in this book have served me well on many projects. The techniques are platform and technology independent. Just pure software engineering.

It's a must for software quality control professionals.
Samulkis Samulkis
Beizer is one of the fathers of software testing in my opinion and this book is a great collection of his testing methodology
Jek Jek
If a foreigner taking English as a second language could easily catch what author wanna present , then you should treat this book as a textbook for new entry . This book covers all the basic topics of software testing .