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eBook Pendragon's Banner: Book Two of the Pendragon's Banner Trilogy ePub

eBook Pendragon's Banner: Book Two of the Pendragon's Banner Trilogy ePub

by Helen Hollick

  • ISBN: 1402218893
  • Category: Programming
  • Subcategory: Computers
  • Author: Helen Hollick
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Sourcebooks Landmark; First Edition Thus edition (September 1, 2009)
  • Pages: 496
  • ePub book: 1581 kb
  • Fb2 book: 1644 kb
  • Other: rtf docx azw doc
  • Rating: 4.9
  • Votes: 830

Description

Pendragon’s Banner Helen Hollick BOOK TWO OF THE PENDRAGON'S BANNER TRILOGY SilverWood Books Published in paperback and eBook 2011 by SilverWood Books ww. ilverwoodbooks.

Pendragon’s Banner Helen Hollick BOOK TWO OF THE PENDRAGON'S BANNER TRILOGY SilverWood Books Published in paperback and eBook 2011 by SilverWood Books ww. Book two of the pendragon's banner trilogy. Published in paperback and eBook 2011 by SilverWood Books. eBook by ww. ristolebooks.

Pendragon's Banner is the second book in Helen Hollick's exciting King Arthur trilogy.

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Pendragon's Banner book. Pendragon's Banner is the second book in Helen Hollick's exciting King Arthur trilogy, covering 459-465 . This is not a fairy tale or fantasy

Pendragon's Banner book. This is not a fairy tale or fantasy. There is no Merlin, no sword in the stone, and no Lancelot. This is the most accurate Arthurian legend ever written, based on historical evidence and me Who was the man ? who became the legend ? we know as KING ARTHUR?

Pendragon's Banner is the second book in Helen Hollick's exciting Kin. Two enemies in particular threaten everything that is dear to him: Winifred, Arthur's vindictive first wife, and Morgause, priestess of the Mother and malevolent Queen of the North.

Pendragon's Banner is the second book in Helen Hollick's exciting Kin. Both have royal ambitions of their own. In this story of harsh battles, secret treasonous plots, and the life-threatening politics of early Britain's dark ages, author Helen Hollick boldly reintroduces King Arthur as you've never seen him before.

Pendragon's Banner: Book Two of the Pendragon's Banner Trilogy. There is no Merlin, no sword in the stone, and no Lancelot

Pendragon's Banner: Book Two of the Pendragon's Banner Trilogy. At age twenty-four, King Arthur has the kingdom he fought so hard for and a new young family. But keeping the throne of Britainand keeping his wife and three sons safeproves far from easy.

Pendragon's Banner is the second book in Helen Hollick's exciting King Arthur trilogy, covering 459-465 . But keeping the throne of Britain-and keeping his wife and three sons safe-proves far from easy

Pendragon's Banner is an historical fantasy trilogy by the British author Helen Hollick, published by William Heinemann in 1994, and later by Sourcebooks Inc in 2009 and by SilverWood Books in 2011.

Pendragon's Banner is an historical fantasy trilogy by the British author Helen Hollick, published by William Heinemann in 1994, and later by Sourcebooks Inc in 2009 and by SilverWood Books in 2011. The three books are a re-telling of the King Arthur legend. They look to show Arthur Pendragon as he might have really been - no magic, fantasy or medieval legend. This is the basic, post-Roman view of Arthur as a battle-hardened warlord.

Two enemies in particular threaten everything that is dear to him: Winifred, Arthur's vindictive first wife, and Morgause, priestess of the Mother and malevolent Queen of the North.

Who was the man … who became the legend … we know as KING ARTHUR?

Pendragon's Banner is the second book in Helen Hollick's exciting King Arthur trilogy, covering 459-465 A.D. This is not a fairy tale or fantasy. There is no Merlin, no sword in the stone, and no Lancelot. This is the most accurate Arthurian legend ever written, based on historical evidence and meticulous research.

At age twenty-four, King Arthur has the kingdom he fought so hard for and a new young family. But keeping the throne of Britain—and keeping his wife and three sons safe—proves far from easy. Two enemies in particular threaten everything that is dear to him: Winifred, Arthur's vindictive first wife, and Morgause, priestess of the Mother and malevolent Queen of the North. Both have royal ambitions of their own.

In this story of harsh battles, secret treasonous plots, and the life-threatening politics of early Britain's dark ages, author Helen Hollick boldly reintroduces King Arthur as you've never seen him before.

PRAISE FOR PENDRAGON'S BANNER:

"Hollick's interpretation is bold, affecting and well worth fighting to defend." Publishers Weekly

"Weaves together fact, legend, and inspired imagination to create a world so real we can breathe the smoke of its fires and revel in the Romano- British lust for life, love and honour." Historical Novel Review

"Camelot as it really was... a very talented writer." Sharon Kay Penman, bestselling author of Devil's Brood

PRAISE FOR THE KINGMAKING:

"Hollick juggles a cast of characters and a bloody, tangled plot with great skill." Publishers Weekly

"If only all historical fiction could be this good." Historical Novels Review

"Stripped of its medieval trappings, the story of Arthur's rise loses none of its legendary power… this [is a] well-researched, skillfully constructed trilogy opener." Library Journal

Comments

Faezahn Faezahn
I really enjoyed this second installment in the Pendragon trilogy, although admittedly not quite as much as I did the first. Character development was crucial in the first novel and I was blown away by the author's skill in creating Arthur and Gwenhwyfar. This novel has the two firmly placed as individuals within the context of the time period and we follow the timeline of Arthur's various battles and struggles. This is not to say that this storyline wasn't an enjoyable read, it was, but the awe I felt at the way in which Arthur and Gwenhwyfar were portrayed in the first novel wasn't nearly as heightened with this one. I'm still just as firmly set in my thinking as I was before I started reading (in summary Arthur's a brute, with Gwenhwyfar being the true hero of the tale!)
It's very hard for me to review this novel without spoilers, but in short the tragedy which befalls the pair really pulled on my heartstrings and again made me place myself firmly in Gwenhwyfar's camp. I find myself rooting for Arthur merely because she does.
I look forward to the final installment now that certain key players have been removed from the tale, plus new ones added to the mix. I'm excited to see how these new faces interplay with Arthur, Gwenhwyfar and their followers.
Vizil Vizil
Hollick’s Pendragon series set out to tell a more realistic story of the Arthurian Legend and she certainly accomplished that. The downside to reading King Arthur books is that most of time, you already know what’s coming but with this series, you’re never quite sure. Hollick took full advantage of letting loose her creativity.

At the same time, there are many of the more classic elements that we all know of the legend, just not always exactly how we know them. The thing about folklore is, of course, that it’s told orally for generations, even centuries, before it’s written down so in theory, if Arthur were a real historical figure or based on one, you would actually have to assume that the legend we know today was warped and evolved over time. Hollick seems to have set out writing with this in mind, building a story where nearly all the classic elements are there but many of them are not exactly how we know them, crafting a believable idea of how this element was warped into that or that character got confused with this.

And yet the story doesn’t feel contrived or reverse engineered. The characters are fleshed out and the story is unpredictable. I can’t wait to read the final book and see where Hollick takes it next.
Fato Fato
All three of Helen Hollick's books on Arthur are excellent. Unlike many other books on Arthur, however, they deal with Arthur from a realistic point of view and deny any form of magic. This has the effect of making the books more historical fiction than fantasy, but very worthwhile if you bear this in mind. Arthur is a much stronger character in these books, but also much more human. His love for Gwenhwyfar is his one saving grace, as he is nearly fatally flawed in every other regard and in every other relationship. Gwenhwyfar also is far more of a real person in this series. She is a real woman with real needs and intelligence of her own, not just the slightly dim but beautiful focal point of chivalry displayed in most portrayals. The Pendragon's Banner Trilogy is an excellent read, and will influence your opinion on all future and past writings of the tale of Camelot.
Bedy Bedy
Helen, you are my new favorite historical fiction writer!! I bought all of your books! My head gets wrapped aroung your stories and I can't get out of them. They are better than any Netflix movie or series. I recommend that you write a book or two about William of Normandy since that is where your Emma series left off. I would buy that too!
Grinin Grinin
Author Helen Hollock's "Pendragon's Banner" is the second novel in the "Pendragon's Banner Trilogy." As with Part #1, I found myself unable to put this book down. Ms. Hollick continues here with her story of King Arthur, a unique tale without magical or supernatural elements. It is more complicated than the first novel. Many of the characters from before, return here. I was immediately drawn into the narrative and was amazed at how believable her characters and storyline are. This is extraordinary "historical" fiction rather than fantasy. Ms. Hollick's Arthur is no mythical monarch of yore, but a flesh and blood, complex man. He is a courageous, warrior king, now approaching his middle years. At times he is cunning and ruthless. He wenches, drinks, has a terrible temper, and adores his lovely Gwenhwyfar and his three sons.

Arthur, the son of a Romano-British nobleman, Uthr, follows the "old religion," the soldiers' god, "Mithras." The Christian Church was still young during the Dark Ages and most people remained pagan for quite some time. Many of Arthur's problems eventually stem from the vying for power between the Church and the old ways.

The setting is an island country situated off the North West coast of Europe - now called Great Britain - during the 5th century. It was inhabited by the Celtic people known as the Britons and a collection of various Germanic peoples, the Anglis, Jutes, and Saxons. This was a time of great upheaval and change. "The province of Britain had been abandoned to fend for herself, for the great power that had for four hundred years dominated an Empire was dying; but in Britain a few influential men clung obstinately to the security of Rome's tattered skirts, refusing to believe their established way of life was over, finished, and a new about to begin." Meanwhile, a power vacuum was created when the Romans left.

Arthur marries his first wife Winifred, the Saxon granddaughter of his hated rival Hengst. Hengst's son, Vortigen, also a bitter enemy, forced him to wed her in order to forge and alliance and keep the peace. Arthur has a son with Winifred, Cerdic, who could be in line for the throne. He divorces Winifred after a short while and then remarries Gwenhwyfar, whom he has loved from boyhood.

He fights to unify the land of Britain, though war and strife plague him constantly. Arthur faces numerous and seemingly insurmountable problems. His uncle Ambrosius, Uthr's youngest brother, longs for a return to the Roman Empire. Also, numerous chieftains are ready to fight to the death to take Arthur's place as High King and Supreme Ruler. Far in the north the evil Morgause, who wants to be queen, plots his downfall. To add to the mix, a series of heartbreaking losses threaten his marriage to Gwenhwyfar. The two quarrel frequently and Arthur's many infidelities are insupportable...at least to me they are, but I don't live in the 5th century. He actually discusses some of his lovers, a few taken for political purposes, with his wife. Ugh!!

Both Arthur and Gwenhwyfar grow and undergo major transformations in "Pendragon's Banner." Arthur is a man who can suppress his emotions when it comes to making decisions, leading his army and his prized calvary in war, and when ruling his kingdom. Emotionally, however, he is still like the boy the reader first met in "The Kingmaking." Here he is, once again, forced to face Morgause, his father's mistress, who abused him so in his childhood. Now she is determined to make him suffer as a man, especially since she has acquired power of her own. Morguase has laid a curse on Arthur - that if he pursues her, none of his sons will live. Another problem he must face concerns his ex-wife, Winifred, who schemes to get the kingship for the son she had by him. And, several plotting warlords refuse to accept him as their rightful king. Now more than ever, he needs the one person he has always loved and trusted. He needs his Gwenhwyfar. She has been, since their adolescence, his best friend, confident, counselor and lover. But their relationship has deteriorated. The question is whether they can rebuild it in time to face their enemies together. There is a sense of foreboding throughout the storyline.

The character Gwenhwyfar is, perhaps, my favorite. She is a strong and independent woman who loves her husband, with all his strengths and shortcomings, and of course she adores her children. She seems to make space for everyone in her life, even while traveling constantly under less than ideal conditions. Of course, she makes mistakes, mostly driven by emotion, but these errors only make her more human.

Oddly, Arthur, Gwenhwyfar, and their sons have never had a home of their own - a castle, a Caer. They've spent years wandering, leading their army and the calvary, the loyal and skilled Artoriani, all over the country, putting down rebellions, forging alliances and making sure the diverse peoples of Britain know he their ruler. All this fighting to keep a kingdom united, frequently cause the family to move to new locations, living a nomadic life in tents. And the travel, under less than ideal circumstances, has caused a further rift between the couple. Gwenhwyfar, a warrior in her own right, and the children, follow Arthur to almost every battlefield, or they spend time with Gwenhwyfar's family in Gwynedd, (today's northwest Wales). Now, they find the perfect place to build their home, a safe haven, in the Summerland, a castle they name Caer Caden. There is no Camelot nor knights of the round table here, however. But, the security that Gwenhwyfar has been longing for is now within reach. And for a while it does seem as if the outside world has allowed the family the peace and time to heal that it so richly deserves. Obviously, this precious, quiet time does not last for long.

The novel spans a period of about seven years during which the sprawling narrative includes much warfare, battle scenes, political scheming as well as intimate details of personal relationships.

Once again, the author delivers a vivid portrait of England in the Dark Ages, complete with the complex political struggles of a tribal nation.

"Pendragon's Banner" is a wonderful and skillfully written sequel to "The Kingmaking." Because of the complex nature of these books, I advise that you read them in sequence. I cannot wait to begin Part 3, "Shadow of the King." Highly recommended!
Jana Perskie

The Kingmaking: Book One of the Pendragon's Banner Trilogy

Shadow of the King: Book Three of the Pendragon's Banner Trilogy

Harold the King