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eBook Programming Scala: Scalability = Functional Programming + Objects (Animal Guide) ePub

eBook Programming Scala: Scalability = Functional Programming + Objects (Animal Guide) ePub

by Alex Payne,Dean Wampler

  • ISBN: 0596155956
  • Category: Programming
  • Subcategory: Computers
  • Author: Alex Payne,Dean Wampler
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: O'Reilly Media; 1 edition (September 25, 2009)
  • Pages: 450
  • ePub book: 1831 kb
  • Fb2 book: 1139 kb
  • Other: txt mbr docx azw
  • Rating: 4.5
  • Votes: 450

Description

Programming Scala is a book written by Dean Wampler, consultant, trainer and mentor with Object Mentor, Inc. He specializes in Scala, Java and Ruby. The second author is Alex Payne. He has been working since the beginning of 2007 for the Twitter, Inc. as Platform Lead. Knowing that Scala is the platform used to develop Twitter, one of the most worldwide used social network, the book becomes very promising.

Scalability Functional Programming + Objects. is a Consultant for Typesafe, where he specializes in helping clients succeed with Scala and Functional Programming projects. He works with "Big Data" tools like Hadoop, Spark, and Machine Learning libraries, and Reactive tools like Akka and Play. Dean is an O'Reilly author and a frequent conference speaker and organizer. in Physics from the University of Washington.

The material of the book although it is dense in concepts, it is readable and the examples are very good and instructive.

You'll learn how to leverage the wealth of Java class libraries to meet the practical needs of enterprise and Internet projects more easily. Learn how Scala's succinct and flexible code helps you program faster. Discover the notable improvements Scala offers over Java's object model.

As for Scala itself, I really like it! Scala is a nice mix of Java, C Erlang, Haskell, Ruby, and Smalltalk. You can treat it as a "better Java", or you can treat it as a more enterprise-friendly Haskell.

Programming Scala book. Start by marking Programming Scala: Scalability Functional Programming + Objects as Want to Read

Programming Scala book. Learn how to be more productive with Scala, a new multi-paradigm. Start by marking Programming Scala: Scalability Functional Programming + Objects as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read.

Dean Wampler, Alex Payne

Dean Wampler, Alex Payne.

by Dean Wampler and Alex Payne. Printed in the United States of America. Based on many examples, you will understand how and when to apply OOP and FP techniques to many different design problems.

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oceedings{ngS, title {Programming Scala - Scalability Functional Programming + Objects}, author {Dean Wampler and Alex Payne}, year {2009} }. Dean Wampler, Alex Payne.

Learn how to be more productive with Scala, a new multi-paradigm language for the Java Virtual Machine (JVM) that integrates features of both object-oriented and functional programming. With this book, you'll discover why Scala is ideal for highly scalable, component-based applications that support concurrency and distribution. Programming Scala clearly explains the advantages of Scala as a JVM language. You'll learn how to leverage the wealth of Java class libraries to meet the practical needs of enterprise and Internet projects more easily. Packed with code examples, this book provides useful information on Scala's command-line tools, third-party tools, libraries, and available language-aware plugins for editors and IDEs.

Learn how Scala's succinct and flexible code helps you program fasterDiscover the notable improvements Scala offers over Java's object modelGet a concise overview of functional programming, and learn how Scala's support for it offers a better approach to concurrencyKnow how to use mixin composition with traits, pattern matching, concurrency with Actors, and other essential featuresTake advantage of Scala's built-in support for XMLLearn how to develop domain-specific languagesUnderstand the basics for designing test-driven Scala applications

Comments

Nto Nto
As a language, Scala offers a lot to like: object orientation, pattern matching, rich lexical extensibility, and attention to details like right vs. left association and co- vs. contra-variant inheritance rules. In short, a huge buffet of features that help routine programming tasks, with special emphasis on developing domain-specific languages.

Unfortunately a lot of that goodness lies hidden under weak presentation. It would have been helpful to see all of the object-declaration features listed in one place, to contrast their behaviors and common aplications. Likewise, seeing the full set of rules for defining operators, all together, would have clarified things that I'm sure are clear to people who already know the language, Then, I couldn't always tell whether I was looking at language primitives or library features - and, given the language's extensibility, there's plenty of room for confusion.

Maybe the information really is all there, somewhere, but a weak index made it hard to find. As a result, I came away from this presentation without solid ideas about the conceptual underpinnings of the language, and with little interest in pursuing it further.

-- wiredweird
Tam Tam
The book "Programming Scala", is a dense, well written book that covers concisely many aspects of this great language.
Scala is the most advanced language with which I have involved, and as I learn it better, I admire even more the clever design decisions behind the language. Therefore, it is difficult to have an easy to read book on such a technically advanced language. The material of the book although it is dense in concepts, it is readable and the examples are very good and instructive.
I strongly recommend the book to anyone involved with Scala, and to anyone that wants to become a better programmer, since Scala is an excellent vehicle to implement robust and effective software systems (I believe that currently is the best one).

The book is very useful as a complement to the classic "Programming in Scala" book of Odersky et. al., which in my opinion is the best for learning systematically Scala from the beginning. It presents many aspects of the language with a different and complementary view and thus the reader can gain a lot of benefits and better familiar with the powerful Scala language.
In conclusion the book of Dean Wampler and Alex Payne is valuable both for the intermediate and advanced Scala programmer and for any's competent programmer's bookself.
Katius Katius
Complete, and gets the job done, but it definitely doesn't follow the "Spiral Approach" or "Inverted Pyramid": explain the simple things first and the details later. For example, already in page 36 we're learning about the exact rules for numeric literals (including how to write them in octal!) On page 51 we get three pages listing every reserved word in the language. Some of the middle chapters are really hard to follow, which is mostly because they're explaining tricky and unfamiliar concepts, but also they could be explained better.
Nirad Nirad
Scala's philosophy of being able to read Java/J2E/JVM libraries is its greatest selling point. Unlike Python that likes to start from scratch which is really next to being useless language, Scala functional point of view and static typing avoids untraceable errors before they go into production. You can hit the ground running instead of re-inventing the wheel with Scala.
Fawrindhga Fawrindhga
I think that Programming in Scala (Odersky) is a much more organized and detailed book than this one. Both books could easily add 500 pages of material to their text and have plenty of topics to cover. Scala has been probably the most difficult language that I have attempted to learn to date. It has also been the most interesting. I truly hope that an advanced scala book will come out in the near future, I would buy it in an instant.
Xanzay Xanzay
Full disclosure: I was the technical editor for Dave Pollak's "Beginning Scala," which of course I also recommend, and Dean and Alex very graciously included my name in their preface. With that said...

"Programming Scala" is simply spectacular work. As I tweeted, it's dense and chewy, like a well-crafted caramel. Dean and Alex bring the full weight of their experience with multiple platforms and languages to bear on Scala, showing us its various strengths (and a few weaknesses!), applying it to tasks that modern programmers are virtually certain to care about, and do so with the sense of fun that I've come so strongly to associate with Dave, Dean, Alex, and really the whole Scala community. That they manage to do this in such a slender volume without feeling rushed, cryptic, or incomplete is a testament to the tightness of their writing and the quality of O'Reilly's editing. "Programming Scala" is an indispensable member of the Scala canon, and deserves a prominent place on your bookshelf.