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eBook Doing Objects in Visual Basic 6 ePub

eBook Doing Objects in Visual Basic 6 ePub

by Deborah Kurata

  • ISBN: 1562765779
  • Category: Programming
  • Subcategory: Computers
  • Author: Deborah Kurata
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Pearson Education; Pap/Cdr edition (December 28, 1998)
  • Pages: 672
  • ePub book: 1364 kb
  • Fb2 book: 1134 kb
  • Other: txt azw lit mobi
  • Rating: 4.8
  • Votes: 934

Description

Deborah Kurata's Doing Object in Visual Basic 6 provides a foundation for object-oriented design (OOD) by describing fundamental concepts and features of Visual Basic that support these concepts. For each design, this guide takes you step-by-step through a case study.

Deborah Kurata's Doing Object in Visual Basic 6 provides a foundation for object-oriented design (OOD) by describing fundamental concepts and features of Visual Basic that support these concepts. For each design, this guide takes you step-by-step through a case study

Автор: Kurata, Deborah Название: Doing objects in visual basic 2005 .

Поставляется из: США Описание: A guide to object-oriented design, architecture, and development with Visual Basic 2005. This book begins with an introduction to core object-oriented concepts and the Visual Basic 2005 features that support them.

Doing Objects In Visual Basic 2005 by. Deborah Kurata. Visual Basic Developer's Guide to ASP and IIS: Build Powerful Server-Side Web Applications with Visual Basic.

Author Deborah Kurata is the original pioneer in building object-oriented applications with Visual Basic. In this book she continues to offer clarity and deliver best practices for using object-oriented techniques in Visual Basic 2005

Author Deborah Kurata is the original pioneer in building object-oriented applications with Visual Basic. In this book she continues to offer clarity and deliver best practices for using object-oriented techniques in Visual Basic 2005. She has been honored with Microsoft’s prestigious MVP designation for her expertise and contributions to the community. Kurata begins with a concise introduction to core object-oriented concepts and the Visual Basic 2005 features that support them

Author Deborah Kurata is the original pioneer in building object-oriented applications with Visual Basic. She has been honored with Microsoft's prestigious MVP designation for her expertise and contributions to the community. Kurata begins with a concise introduction to core object-oriented concepts and the Visual Basic 2005 features that support them.

This book is the result of a multi-year collaboration between Harvard Business School professor Robert Austin and leading theatre director and playwright Lee Devin. Sams, 1999 - 646 sivua. Together, they demonstrate striking structural similarities between theatre artistry and production and today's business projects-and show how collaborative artists have mastered the art of delivering innovation "on cue," on immovable deadlines and budgets. These methods are neither mysterious nor flaky: they are rigorous, precise, and-with this book's help-absolutely learnable and reproducible.

Deborah Kurata does her Doing Objects thing again! This is the newest book from Deborah which has been completely rewritten from the ground up for the Visual Basic. Anyone needing a solid foundation in object technology, Visual Basic. Net 2005, and Visual Studio. Net 2005 should read this book.

Doing Objects in Visual Basic 6. by Deborah Kurata. The whole first half of the book presents a complete OO design methodology (GUIDS) that really helped me keep organized and focused. The problem was that as my programs got longer and more involved they became confussed with redundant code and new features and bugs creeping in. Good book for Object Oriented Programming. Published by Thriftbooks. com User, 18 years ago. This is a good book for beginner and expert.

Deborah Kurata's Doing Object in Visual Basic 6 provides a foundation for object-oriented design (OOD) by describing fundamental concepts and features of Visual Basic that support these concepts. For each design, this guide takes you step-by-step through a case study. Doings Objects in Visual Basic 6 shows you how to build ActiveX EXEs, ActiveX DLLs and ActiveX controls, how to create database objects using the universal data access strategy, OLE DB, and ADO. It details how to use the new Data View window, the new Data Environment designer, access a database using ADO, the new CallByName function, build data-aware classes, and use the new data binding features. Also find how to create three-tiered, object-oriented database applications using these new technologies and pull all that you've learned together into a functioning application.

Comments

Clonanau Clonanau
I could not put it any better then what Eric T. Nielsen stated earlier in the comments.
The book is very clear and to the point. I hate to be maintaining the code of what others stated about this book such as; "nothing new....", "..waste of time....", "this is only a..." , "not intended for" and "weak".
Keep it simple, read Kurata, then Balena (MS Programming VB 6.0).
Ť.ħ.ê_Ĉ.õ.о.Ł Ť.ħ.ê_Ĉ.õ.о.Ł
One thing about Kurata's book is that for the most part it is readable, unlike the disconnected snippets that software companies provide in their online documentation. The heart of the book is in three chapters: 10-12 that describe the basics of VB classes, interfaces, polymorphism, delegation, collections, etc with good examples. The first part of the book is an overview of an application design process. The last part of the book provides only very brief discussions of many topics such as ActiveX Controls, DHTML, IIS, etc. But the book is not consistent in its level and completeness. This book is not for experienced VB programmers - but the assumption of knowledge concerning components and data/DB design makes the design section of questionable utility for inexperienced VB programmers. Who is this section for? But the intro to VB objects is right-on for the relative newcomer. Kurata leaves her topic of VB ActiveX components far too quickly. Her coverage of ActiveX EXE components leaves a lot to be desired with the explanations and ramificaations of the various project settings being no better than the fragmentary tidbits of online help. Examples have ceased at this point. The frustrating, obscure, and important subject of threading and apartments that lurks beneath VB EXE components is covered no better, if as well, as numerous other authors who claim to do so. I think a better book is in Kurata based on the promise of the heart of the book. Undoubtedly the superficial nature of the last of the book was a cave-in to the buzz-word, marketing types. Until someone can produce a coherent, complete, and readable book on ActiveX components for VB programmers [and there is not one on the market], the programming community will have to rely on unsatisfactory MS or MS-aided articles that give us "clever" or "ingenious" ways of achieving programming tasks beyond the ordinary. At this point VB is one of the most "trial-and-error" tools available. Hopefully that is not because of its internal incoherence. If not, we do not need "tricks" articles.
thrust thrust
This book was a major disappointment for me, considering Ms. Kurata's earlier book 'Doing Objects in VB 4.0' was so wonderful.
The main problem with the book is that it does not lay a sold foundation to the subject of OOP. The topics are not presented in a systematic way where each topic builds on the ones already presented.
Although the author builds a single application throughout the course of the book, the relation between each programming topic and the code examples is just not clear. If I had not already been programming in OOP for a year and a half, I would have been completely lost in this book.
Also, the whole first half of the book presents a proprietary OO design methodology (GUIDS) that is not helpful. It doesn't tell me much more than what I know from the old-fashioned structured analysis and design methodologies. The book would be much stronger if the first half was just omitted.
There is some useful information to be gained from the book if you already know OOP. (I learned some things that I have not seen in any other books.) But if you already know OOP, then you can skip over this one entirely.
For a topflight intro to Object Oriented programming in VB, read Peter Wright's book 'Beginning VB6 objects'. Wright's book should be required reading for all VB programmers.
spacebreeze spacebreeze
The back of this book claims this is written for the 'Profession' level. I disagree, although I don't know who this is really intended for - newbies to OOA&D, maybe.
I have a basic understanding of OO principles and have been programming with VB for three years. Besides the chapter on interfaces, inheritance and polymorphism there was nothing really new for me here and anything that was new was covered in such brevity as to be completely worthless (DHTML, ActiveX controls). Anything slightly technical was brushed off. In fact, it seemed most of the VB portions of this book was spent asking readers to read other books/articles to get the real facts (a thorough bibliography is a good thing but don't rely on it as the basis for your entire book).
Warning!!! - The first half of this book is about OOA&D (the GUIDS methodology) and has hardly any reference to VB. The GUIDS methodology would only be useful to someone who is completely new to OO concepts. In other words there is nothing new here.
I think this could be a better book if the VB portion of the book was expanded and GUIDS methodology portion was removed completely (maybe put it into its own book).
One final thing I found particularly offensive was the front cover which listed topics that were to be covered in the book. The majority of these topics were barely covered in any kind of depth (e.g. DHTML, IIS applications, 3-tiered components)- false advertising in my book.
Daizil Daizil
This book is one of the best written programming books I have read. (The standard of description in most books in the subject is very poor - but this stands head and shoulders above these). The subject is well covered and I recommend this book to anyone using the technology. The early chapters are especially good at cutting through the jargon barriers that often exist when meeting the subject.