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eBook Decrypted Secrets: Methods and Maxims of Cryptology ePub

eBook Decrypted Secrets: Methods and Maxims of Cryptology ePub

by Friedrich Ludwig Bauer,F. L. Bauer

  • ISBN: 3540668713
  • Category: Security and Encryption
  • Subcategory: Computers
  • Author: Friedrich Ludwig Bauer,F. L. Bauer
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Springer-Verlag Telos; 2nd Rev&Ex edition (January 2000)
  • Pages: 470
  • ePub book: 1611 kb
  • Fb2 book: 1111 kb
  • Other: azw txt doc mbr
  • Rating: 4.7
  • Votes: 605

Description

Friedrich L. Bauer Professor Emeritus of Mathematics and Computer Scienc. as written an outstanding book on. .

Friedrich L. as written an outstanding book on cryptology that belongs in your personal library or as a gift for a friend. There are other fascinating sidelights to this excellent book. The Cryptogram, Page 15, 2007). I have been involved in the study, and application, of cryptology since 1997 when I originally read this book, which helped to educate me about the secretive but fascinating world of hidden codes. This book, Decrypted Secrets: Methods and Maxims of Cryptology, greatly assisted my hunt for the Shroud Codes, which led to my book, Shroud Codes in the Bible.

In today's unsafe and increasingly wired world cryptology plays a vital role in protecting communication channels, databases, and software from unwanted intruders. The first part treats secret codes and their uses - cryptography. The second part deals with the process of covertly decrypting a secret code - cryptanalysis, where particular advice on assessing methods is given.

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As the subtitle reveals, the book Decrypted Secret discusses dierent methods and maxims of cryptology. The book consists of two parts: cryptology and cryptanalysis. The rst part of the book gives an overview of cryptology as such and introduces dierent encryption systems including their structure and method as well as their historical background. As an introduction, the author presents some people from dierent areas, who played a role in cryptography.

Decrypted Secrets" has become a standard book on cryptology. Friedrich L. The best single book on cryptology today" (David Kahn, Cryptologia) "For those who work actively with cryptology this book is a must. By far the best single work on the subject.

The first part treats secret codes and their uses - cryptography Spiced with a wealth of exciting, amusing, and sometimes personal stories from the history of cryptology, it will also interest.

The first part treats secret codes and their uses - cryptography. The book presupposes only elementary mathematical knowledge. Spiced with a wealth of exciting, amusing, and sometimes personal stories from the history of cryptology, it will also interest general readers.

The book is full of very good and interesting technical information. The part on cryptanalysis is rather new and informative. The history part is mostly taken from Khan's book (you'll find some pictures in both) so there is nothing really new in this area.

He also wrote a well-respected book on cryptology, Decrypted secrets .

He was the doctoral advisor of 39 students, including Manfred Broy, David Gries, Manfred Paul, Gerhard Seegmüller, Josef Stoer, Peter Wynn, and Christoph Zenger. Bauer was a colleague of the German Representative the NATO Science Committee  .

Atlantic Books, London, 562 pages, £2. 0. The Best Single Book on Cryptology Today, Cryptologia. The Best Single Book on Cryptology Today, Cryptologia, 28(1): 128–129. Codes The Guide to Secrecy from Ancient to Modern Times. The confidentiality of our proposed protocol is unconditionally secure.

Cryptology, for millennia a "secret science", is rapidly gaining in pr actical importance for the protection of communication channels, datab ases, and software. Beside its role in computerized information system's (public key systems), more and more applications within computer sys tems and networks are appearing, which also extend to access rights an d source file protection. The first part of this book treats secret co des and their uses - cryptography. The second part deals with the proc ess of covertly decrypting a secret code - cryptanalysis - where in pa rticular advice on assessing methods is given. The book presupposes on ly elementary mathematical knowledge. Spiced with a wealth of exciting , amusing, and sometimes personal stories from the history of cryptolo gy, it will also interest general readers. Decrypted Secrets has becom e a standard book on cryptology. The new edition has been revised and extended in many details.

Related to Decrypted Secrets: Methods and Maxims of Cryptology

Comments

Danskyleyn Danskyleyn
This book was written by a mathematician, primarily for mathematicians, however, others should find quite a bit to interest them. The book discusses the mathematics of ciphers and to get the most from the book you should have a good working knowledge of set theory, group theory, series mathematics, matrix algebra, modular arithmetic, and Galois theory. This is not to say that if you are not familiar with these fields you will find nothing of interest here. Quite the contrary, as the book also contains a lot of non-mathematical information about codes and ciphers, particularly in regards to their use in WWII. There are sections on ‘Cryptology and Human Rights” (particularly in regards to the current use of ciphers and the Internet), “Maxims of Cryptology” and the history of cryptology. I found that I learned a lot, even though I was not conversant in all of the mathematical disciplines that are utilized. Unfortunately, the author takes for granted that the reader has the requisite mathematical background and therefore does not include any general mathematical material.

I would recommend this book the mathematicians who want information about applying their mathematics to ciphers, and to experts on ciphers who want to learn more about this highly mathematical approach. I would also recommend the book to someone, like myself, who is more interested in the historical aspects of ciphers, particularly as it applies to the last 100 years. I found the book to be a good adjunct to the other that I have read on this subject, but certainly would not recommend it as a first book on the subject, or to someone with only a casual interest in it.

What is in the Book –
The book is divided into two parts – Cryptography (codes, ciphers, their classification and development), and Cryptanalysis (the techniques used decipher encrypted messages). The approach of each section is to mathematically classify the cipher in question and in the Cryptology section describe how it operates and in the Cryptanalysis part how to go about deciphering each class. The book contains numerous examples of ciphers and their solution, but in a highly mathematical framework. Unfortunately, if you are unfamiliar with the mathematics then much of this material may be quite inaccessible to you.
Ucantia Ucantia
★★★★★ from GENREV on January 26, 2017

RESEARCHING THIS BOOK HELPED ME IN MY DISCOVERY OF THE SHROUD CODES IN THE BIBLE.

I have been involved in the study, and application, of cryptology since 1997 when I originally read this book, which helped to educate me about the secretive but fascinating world of hidden codes. This book, Decrypted Secrets: Methods and Maxims of Cryptology, greatly assisted my hunt for the Shroud Codes, which led to my book, Shroud Codes in the Bible. The lessons I learned from books on cryptology were akin to going to a school for cryptology.
nailer nailer
This is an amazing book, and relatively inexpensive; Springer-Verlag has done it again.
Rather than being a dry recitation of encryption and cryptanalysis schemes, Bauer provides a great deal of information about what actually goes wrong when one tries to construct a cipher that must be used under pressure by non-cryptologists, with plenty of historical examples to illustrate his points. And he discusses at some length the ways in which cryptanalysts can hope to unravel ciphers and codes too strong to be broken by standard methods. Much of what he has to say I had never seen in print before; some of it was brand new to me. Perhaps it helps that Bauer is German, and doesn't have to write with the uneasy feeling that NSA or MI-6 is looking over his shoulder at every line he writes. For example, his explanation of how Robert Murphy compromised an American cipher in WW II so badly that the Germans could read it easily is one that I think some American officials would probably still prefer not to have in print.
Despite comments by other reviewers and by Cryptologia, I think it requires a certain mathematical sophistication to absorb much of the material in this book. The math is not hard, but Bauer implicitly assumes a mathematical mindset and a familiarity with the terminology of pure mathematics that most college undergraduates don't have. So I wouldn't choose it as the primary text for a first course in cryptology, but I would certainly use it as a supplementary text. I know of no other book that contains so much material on the practical realities of cryptology.
Shadowbourne Shadowbourne
Good book
The Sinners from Mitar The Sinners from Mitar
This book isn't a great reading book; it's meant more for referencing. It goes in great mathematical detail on various crypto subjects.
Contancia Contancia
I read this book in the original German (even though reading in German is still a labor for me), and the effort was amply rewarded. This book is a first course in cryptography, at the upper undergraduate or beginning graduate level. Its competition would be books like Denning's or Beker and Piper or Koblitz' series. Denning's book is still great and worth buying (and Ms. Denning is a wonderful, accomplished, and intelligent person), but Bauer is more modern and complete. Koblitz' books are all first rate, but Bauer stays on the task of cryptology much more exactly and usefully. This is the basis of an excellent course in several German universities, especially in Munich. If I taught another course purely on cryptography (and not as part of a larger math curriculum---where Koblitz' book is best), I would certainly use this as the text. However, even though this is best, I really think everyone should still buy, read, and treasure Ms. Denning's book, Cryptology, too. (A true classic is never actually superseded.) Buy Bauer. It is better than an existing classic. While I don't have the English version yet, and cannot, therefore, vouch for the quality of the translation, I think that Springer Verlag is such a reliable editor that we can both trust that the translation will be good before we even see it.