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eBook America Eats!: On the Road with the WPA - the Fish Fries, Box Supper Socials, and Chitlin Feasts That Define Real American Food ePub

eBook America Eats!: On the Road with the WPA - the Fish Fries, Box Supper Socials, and Chitlin Feasts That Define Real American Food ePub

by Pat Willard

  • ISBN: 1596913622
  • Category: Cooking Education and Reference
  • Subcategory: Cooking
  • Author: Pat Willard
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Bloomsbury USA; 1st edition (July 15, 2008)
  • Pages: 320
  • ePub book: 1620 kb
  • Fb2 book: 1956 kb
  • Other: azw docx mobi lrf
  • Rating: 4.7
  • Votes: 123

Description

Print Length: 320 pages. America Eats!, as the project was entitled, was never published.

Print Length: 320 pages. With the unpublished WPA manuscript as her guide, Willard visits the sites of American foods past glory to explore whether American traditional cuisine is still as healthy and vibrant today as it was then.

Christian Science Monitor Pat Willard takes readers on a journey into the regional nooks and crannies of American . The book takes us back to a time when large gatherings of people celebrated food - events that helped create communities and neighborhoods and churches

Christian Science Monitor Pat Willard takes readers on a journey into the regional nooks and crannies of American cuisine. The book takes us back to a time when large gatherings of people celebrated food - events that helped create communities and neighborhoods and churches. I did not live during those days in the 1930's and 1940's. And no, I don't eat squirrel stew.

In America Eats! Pat Willard takes readers on a journey into the regional nooks and crannies of American .

In America Eats! Pat Willard takes readers on a journey into the regional nooks and crannies of American cuisine where WPA writers―including Eudora Welty, Saul Bellow, Ralph Ellison, and Nelson Algren, among countless others―were dispatched in 1935 to document the roots of our diverse culinary cuisine. With the unpublished WPA manuscript as her guide, Willard visits the sites of American food’s past glory to rediscover the vibrant foundation of America’s traditional cuisine

In America Eats! Pat Willard takes readers on a journey into the regional nooks and crannies of American cuisine where WPA writers-including Eudora Welty, Saul Bellow, Ralph Ellis. What the Sterns did for road food, Pat Willard does for festive American group eating in this exploration of our national cuisine, with a ed WPA manuscript as her guide.

Pat Willard’s book, also entitled America Eats!, first published by Bloomsbury in 2008, is being reissued in paperback .

Pat Willard’s book, also entitled America Eats!, first published by Bloomsbury in 2008, is being reissued in paperback form in late summer or early fall 2009. Ms. Willard became interested in the topic after visiting the manuscript rooms at the Library of Congress. Unlike the author of another recent book based on the same project, Ms. Willard felt compelled to travel around the United States to discover what remains of the regional cuisines and community gatherings mentioned in the original material

Not unlike going out with good friends or long-lost relatives for a taste of country life

Not unlike going out with good friends or long-lost relatives for a taste of country life. Christian Science Monitor Pat Willard takes readers on a journey into the regional nooks and crannies of American cuisine, where WPA writers were dispatched in 1935 to document the roots of our diverse culinary culture. Title: America Eats!: On the Road with the WPA - the Fish Fries, Box Supper Socials, and Chitlin Feasts That Define. Feature:

In America Eats! Pat Willard takes readers on a journey into the regional nooks and crannies of American cuisine where WPA writers†including Eudora Welty, Saul Bellow, Ralph Ellison, and Nelson Algren, among countless others†were dispatched in 1935 to document the roots of our diverse culinary cuisine. With the unpublished WPA manuscript as her guide, Willard visits the sites of American food’s past glory to rediscover the vibrant foundation of America’s traditional cuisine. She visits a booyah cook-off in Minnesota, a political feast in Mississippi, a watermelon festival in Oklahoma,.

Pat Willard takes readers on a journey into the regional nooks and crannies of American cuisine, where WPA writers were dispatched in 1935 to document the roots of our diverse culinary culture. Download from free file storage. Скачать с помощью Mediaget. com/America Eats!: On the Road with the WPA - the Fish Fries, Box Supper Socials, and Chitlin Feasts That Define.

Christian Science Monitor Pat Willard takes readers on a journey into the regional nooks and crannies of American cuisine, where WPA writers were dispatched in 1935 to document the roots of our diverse culinary culture. America Eats!: On the Road with the WPA. By Thriftbooks. com User, October 14, 2009. During the Great Depression, many programs were created by the Federal Government to provide jobs for those who had none. We are still benefitting today from the fruits of that labor which created many public buildings, roads, bridges and parks. One project, however, never saw the light of day.

America Eats!, as the project was entitled, was never published.

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What the Sterns did for road food, Pat Willard does for festive American group eating in this exploration of our national cuisine, with a never-before-published WPA manuscript as her guide.In America Eats! Pat Willard takes readers on a journey into the regional nooks and crannies of American cuisine where WPA writers―including Eudora Welty, Saul Bellow, Ralph Ellison, and Nelson Algren, among countless others―were dispatched in 1935 to document the roots of our diverse culinary cuisine. With the unpublished WPA manuscript as her guide, Willard visits the sites of American food's past glory to rediscover the vibrant foundation of America's traditional cuisine. She visits a booyah cook-off in Minnesota, a political feast in Mississippi, a watermelon festival in Oklahoma, and a sheepherders ball in Idaho, to name a few. Featuring recipes and never-before-seen photos, including those from the WPA by Dorothea Lange, Ben Shahn, and Marion Post Wolcott, America Eats! is a glowing celebration of American food, past and present.

Comments

Kanek Kanek
A nice book which revolves around Pat's journey across America in search of the communities, the people, and their ways which gave inspiration to the WPA cookbook writers of the Great Depression. I enjoyed the read. I like history, long journeys down two lane roads, and old home movies, so the book worked for me. Reading this was a bit like vicariously driving Route 66 or the Lincoln Highway ... and being invited to eat at peoples homes and join in on local fairs, pot lucks, and fund raisers.

The old recipes were fun to read and mull over. It's interesting to see what folks ate back then, the festivals they held, etc.. As you will discover, many of those customs, events, festivals, and recipes are still with us and Pat does a nice job of discussing how they have remained the same, morphed, and adapted to changes in demographics. There is an intrinsic value in this book which is hard to put into words, but once you read it you will understand.
Kikora Kikora
"America Eats! On the Road with the WPA" is a great book for those interested in WPA, food, and changes in American Cuisine. Willard has an interesting interpretation of exactly what is "American Cuisine." She does a great job in preserving the original works for anthropologists/historians, rather than sterilizing the words for today's Politically Correct obsessed readers. Willard covers the differences between the final vision of the editors and the writers, as well as why so much of the original work is missing. She included minor background info on the New Deal programs that enabled this project to occur for those who may be unfamiliar with this era. There are brief snippets to cover major changes in areas, like NC tobacco farms being replaced by vineyards. A personal dislike was the absence of Lexington, NC, in the BBQ section. Here, BBQ is a religion, which would have fit with the anthropological interpretation. Overall, a quick and interesting read, but I was still left wanting more.
Frei Frei
Interesting review of American food of a by-gone era. Many of these regional foods have disappeared in the fast food glut found in most of our cities today. Very interesting read for food and history buffs
Fohuginn Fohuginn
Interesting aspect of American history.
post_name post_name
This book makes me homesick for some great food and fun times at the county fair! Well written, with interesting old photos. Interesting to learn about traditions in food and fun around the country.
Pruster Pruster
An entertaining and educational read, likely to spawn much culinary experimentation and perhaps regional exploration.
JoJolar JoJolar
Completely disappointed in this book. I was hoping to locate some historical description of the function and possible menus of food for the box-Social American event, as that is what our church is trying to use for a fund-raising event. NO MENTION OF THE BOX-SOCIAL (AUCTION) SUPPER, NOT IN THE TABLE OF CONTENTS, NOR IN THE INDEX, NOR ANYWHERE ELSE IN THE BOOK; except as a caption under a picture on p.203 of a man holding up a pie that was being auctioned. Beyond that caption, I didn't find any use of the words "auction" or "box social".
THEREFORE, in my opinion, that phrase on the front cover is fraudulently deceptive.
Background history - Give applause to Franklin Delano Roosevelt who started the WPA during the Great Depression to help real Americans earn money and keep their dignity. All of us know about the bridges and Post Offices and roads. Amazing - nine million people received money from the U.S. Government and they paid us back with over a million projects. Jobs were handed out even to unemployed newspaper reporters, novelists, and poets. They were paid to support national patriotism and give birth to a national identity. One assignment - travel the American heartland, towns, and ports and document the way Americans feast - talk about the food at the harvest fairs, political and community fundraisers, square dances, or religious revivals.

Washington D.C. did not want recipes, it wanted stories. This book is about those stories. These colorful accounts are important historical material. After all, "politics and barbeques go so naturally together because it takes the same amount of time to cook the meat as it does to stroke the voters."

Some gems: A group of African American women argue about a fund raiser where the participants plan to serve pig feet: A woman resists: "Who wants ole pig feet? They give you indigestion. The last time the pig feet were cold and half done."

Or a huge salmon barbecue where the salmon is "dunked in a big tub of water with lots of brown sugar. After about half an hour the fish is removed and placed in the barbecue pit and covered with ferns and grass." Sounds wonderfully tasty.

Or a religious revival where the master of ceremonies shouts to the crowd: "Who danced before the Lord until his clothes fell off? [The crowd replies] - "David!" Later they will feast on "fried fish and chicken, roasted corn, baked ham, all kinds of long-cooked greens, meat in red-hot sauce, and custard pies."

Or an Irish tavern in Olde New York where the innkeeper believed "in the right of the male to peace and ease while enjoying his standard delicacies of ale and onions..."

The book takes us back to a time when large gatherings of people celebrated food - events that helped create communities and neighborhoods and churches.

I did not live during those days in the 1930's and 1940's. And no, I don't eat squirrel stew.

Still I believe something terribly important is at risk in our culture. I see too many young people spend lots of time looking down at their smart phones rather than making new friends across a long table groaning with good eats for all to share.

A last thought - "It's worth it to see so many folks eat their part of wholesome vittals."