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eBook Mankafy Sakafo: Delicious Meals From Madagascar ePub

eBook Mankafy Sakafo: Delicious Meals From Madagascar ePub

by Jill Donenfeld

  • ISBN: 0595425917
  • Category: Cooking Education and Reference
  • Subcategory: Cooking
  • Author: Jill Donenfeld
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: iUniverse, Inc. (April 9, 2007)
  • Pages: 96
  • ePub book: 1575 kb
  • Fb2 book: 1116 kb
  • Other: lrf mbr doc lit
  • Rating: 4.3
  • Votes: 277

Description

Jill Donenfeld is the founder of The Culinistas, a weekly home chef service in New York, Los Angeles .

Jill Donenfeld is the founder of The Culinistas, a weekly home chef service in New York, Los Angeles, and Chicago. But books, new business ventures, and killer parties make her repertoire a touch more eclectic. Her next cookbook, Party Like a Culinista is recently in stores and published by Lake Isle Press.

Start by marking Mankafy Sakafo: Delicious Meals from Madagascar as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read.

This is the first and only cookbook on cuisine from Madagascar  . Start by marking Mankafy Sakafo: Delicious Meals from Madagascar as Want to Read: Want to Read savin.

Since Madagascar gained independence from French colonial rule in 1960, Malagasy cuisine has . Donenfeld, Jill (2007). Mankafy Sakafo:Delicious meals from Madagascar.

Since Madagascar gained independence from French colonial rule in 1960, Malagasy cuisine has reflected the island's diverse cultures and historic influences. Throughout the country, rice is considered the preeminent food and constitutes the main staple of the diet in all but the most arid regions of the south and west. Accompanying dishes served with rice vary regionally according to availability of ingredients and local cultural norms. The Statesman's Year-book: Statistical and Historical Annual of the States of the World for the Year 1916. London: St. Martin's Press.

Mankafy Sakafo: Delicious Meals from Madagascar by Jill A. Donenfeld (English) P.

Shipping to Russian Federation. Donenfeld traveled there in 2005 and stayed for five months. She stayed with various families and lived in many parts of the island

This is the first and only cookbook on cuisine from Madagascar. She stayed with various families and lived in many parts of the island. The book is a cohesive collection of recipes from all parts of the island-highlands and lowlands, mountains and beaches, north and south.

Jill Donenfeld began writing the business plan for her private chef service The Culinistas .

Jill Donenfeld began writing the business plan for her private chef service The Culinistas - formerly The Dish's Dish - just three days after graduating from Columbia University. Six years later, the 27-year-old's company has attracted high-profile clients such as Neil Patrick Harris, Gwyneth Paltrow, and the Kardashians. During a five-month trip to Madagascar, she also wrote the book "Mankafy Sakafo: Delicious Meals From Madagascar," which documents Donenfeld's food journey and the recipes she collected throughout different regions of the island.

Delicious Meals from Madagascar. Shipped in 8 to 10 working days. She discusses the importance of rice, gives recipes for street foods, and gives recipes for everyday home cooking as well. Malagasy cuisine is quite rich, with an abundance of vanilla, coconut, and seafood. Donenfeld endearingly tells of her travels through her recipes, introducing us to family and friends she, and surely readers, will never forget.

Mankafy Sakafo: Delicious Meals From Madagascar. Jill Donenfeld is a writer, entrepreneur, and chef with recipes appearing in Food & Wine and articles in Men’s Journal and The Huffington Post. ISBN: 9780595425914 Paperback (United States) 4/9/2007. She is the founder of The Culinistas, a private chef and catering agency in NYC, LA, and Chicago and produces bottarga for top purveyors and restaurants around the country. She has lived in Madagascar, Southern India, and Sweden to pursue culinary endeavors. She attended Barnard College in New York City and currently resides there, mostly.

This is the first and only cookbook on cuisine from Madagascar. Donenfeld traveled there in 2005 and stayed for five months. She stayed with various families and lived in many parts of the island. The book is a cohesive collection of recipes from all parts of the island-highlands and lowlands, mountains and beaches, north and south. She discusses the importance of rice, give recipes for street foods, and give recipes for everyday home cooking as well. Malagasy cuisine is quite rich, with an abundance of vanilla, coconut, and seafood. Donenfeld endearingly tells of her travels through her recipes, introducing us to family and friends she, and surely readers, will never forget. It was a journey for her to write this book and now her readers will be able to take part in the journey as they read and prepare the recipes.

Comments

Levion Levion
I am writing this review to encourage potential readers and buyers to ignore the unnecessarily mean and obviously misogynistic review left by Andreas Kammer. This book is a great overview of Malagasy cuisine. While it is not the only one (as it purports), it is the only one in English. The other three main ones are in French. The author provides interesting background information on most recipes. And they are easy to follow and complete. Every cuisine has its high and low versions of national dishes. Donenfeld represents the common versions, cooked at home or sold by street vendors. If you want the fancier, "haute" versions found in restaurants and hotels, check out another great Malagasy cookbook, Ma Cuisine Malgache by Angeline Espangne-Ravo. While Espagne-Ravo's versions may have one or two more ingredients (mainly meat where Donenfeld's may not - again, this highlights the economic division) they are the same recipes.
The only real thing lacking in Donenfeld's recipes is the mention of mafana leaves (aka paracress) which is a vital, indigenous ingredient, particularly in traditional romazava. She says to use bunches of "greens", which is way too vague. But one can certainly excuse her for this as the average reader would need more than amazing luck to get these leaves anywhere outside of Madagascar (or Brazil, where they are also popular).
On the whole, this book is perfect for learning about Malagasy cuisine as the everyday people of the island enjoy it. If you want to try the higher end (and speak French) check out one of the other Malagasy cookbooks. But you don't really need to. This one is just fine.
Flas Flas
If you are purchasing this book because you want to try some rare international cuisine, try a different culture. If you are going to be going to Madagascar for a long period of time, or have been there and just want some of those recipes that you miss...then this is an excellent book. Madagascar isn't known for their wonderful style of cooking, things are either boiled or fried, and are generally pretty bland tasting. But nonetheless, if you are looking for a real Malagasy cookbook, this is the best you will find outside of a Peace Corps cookbook directly from Mada.
Virn Virn
My sister has visited Madagascar through her work with a zoo, for conservation and research. She fell in love with the people, the culture, the island, and the animals. Finding this book of meals from the culture was a home run gift for me.

Thanks for putting out a quality product like this. Not too many things from Madagascar are out there on the web, much less anything with the simplicity of this.

Thanks again!
Ynye Ynye
One Star is too much. If you have been to madagascar and eat these recipes........ well. you wouldnt

I was a creole chef for 10 years. I have been to Madagascar for 10 weeks of my life. I love creole cuisine. this book includes none of it. furthermore, it butchers the local dishes. Romazava, for example, is a very intricate dish Ive had out in the bush and in restaraunts. the way its described in the book is slop with the minimal ingredients.

She (Jill) calls upon lime in many of the dishes, when I have never seen lime in all my travels over there. They use lemon. She uses rosemary often, when this has never been a strong flavor in malagasy cuisine.

AS far as street food, she must have never had "Cubana" offered everwhere in the streets ( a sweet peanut rice roll in banana leaves) or the sweet woofie sandwiches in Diego Suarez made by the old ladies out there every morning slabbing up baguettes and stuffing them with ground spiced meat and their own version of slaw.

Look, you can find better Malagasy cuisine on the web. the only reason I wrote this was that food and Madagascar is quite dear to me and this woman calls herself a food critic/chef, when obviously she has no palate whatsoever. I wish I could honestly say " I mean no harm" but food critics on a whole are a bunch of snobs, it just makes me laugh when one of them sets themself out too far and I catch it. This bird doesnt know what the hell she is talking about!

This cookbook sucks. if you want Malagasy cooking search "Adventure Andy" and Madagascar..(email me).. (or just google the name of the dish): its a hell of a lot cheaper. I will give all I know for free. This book is a bloody embarrassment. Any person who calls themselves a food critic or a chef should be embarrassed by this work. Worst I have ever seen. cant even get Sakay right.
Samowar Samowar
Excellent cookbook for people who likes different foods.
Many nice recepises from easy one to more difficult one.