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eBook The New Kitchen Science: A Guide to Know the Hows and Whys for Fun and Success in the Kitchen ePub

eBook The New Kitchen Science: A Guide to Know the Hows and Whys for Fun and Success in the Kitchen ePub

by Howard Hillman

  • ISBN: 061824963X
  • Category: Cooking Education and Reference
  • Subcategory: Cooking
  • Author: Howard Hillman
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Mariner Books; Revised, Updated edition (February 19, 2003)
  • Pages: 336
  • ePub book: 1241 kb
  • Fb2 book: 1486 kb
  • Other: mbr rtf txt lrf
  • Rating: 4.3
  • Votes: 815

Description

One small problem is that this format is not the best approach to presenting & in that science is a body of theories and explained phenomena the understanding of which facilitates applying knowledge to understanding new situations. If you really need to have fun with your reading about food science, I recommend & Cook Book Decoder or Culinary Alchemy Explained' by retired Canadian professor of Chemistry, Arthur E. Grosser.

Want to know the different cooking and nutritional properties of various oils? Check the tables found in this book. Trying to choose some new cookware for your kitchen?

One small problem is that this format is not the best approach to presenting & in that science is a body of theories and explained phenomena the understanding of which facilitates applying knowledge to understanding new situations. Want to know the different cooking and nutritional properties of various oils? Check the tables found in this book. Trying to choose some new cookware for your kitchen?

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A New Earth: Awakening to Your Life's Purpose. The Art of Writing Business Reports and Proposals. Kitchen Science: A Guide to Knowing the Hows and Whys for Fun and Success in the Kitchen. Good Omens: The Nice and Accurate Prophecies of Agnes Nutter, Witch.

Success in the Kitchen By: Howard Hillman Format: Paperback Vendor: Mariner Books Publication Date: 2003.

Title: The New Kitchen Science: A Guide to Know the Hows & Whys for Fun & Success in the Kitchen By: Howard Hillman Format: Paperback Vendor: Mariner Books Publication Date: 2003. Weight: 12 ounces ISBN: 061824963X ISBN-13: 9780618249633 Stock No: WW49630. Publisher's Description.

He is a graduate of Harvard Business School, and has published over 25 books

He is a graduate of Harvard Business School, and has published over 25 books. He wrote the "longest article ever to appear in The New York Times Travel Section. The Diner's Guide to Wines (1978). The Book of World Cuisines (. ISBN 0-14-004989-4, 1979). The Cook's Book (. ISBN 0-380-76794-5, 1981).

Howard Hillman is the author of more than twenty-five books on food and wine. He has contributed articles to the New York Times, the Wall Street Journal, and Food & Wine as well as other distinguished publications.

In this revised and updated edition of the book that thousands of cooks have turned to when they have a question, the science authority Howard Hillman provides the latest findings about everything from cooking methods, equipment, and food storage to nutrition and health concerns.

Comments

Gralmeena Gralmeena
a great book for a new cook. Its a buy and at 71 years old I learned some things also. Will give this book to my granddaughter
Elastic Skunk Elastic Skunk
`The New Kitchen Science' by culinary journalist Howard Hillman is a new edition of a 20 year old book which uses the question and answer format common to a lot of cooking advice books. One small problem is that this format is not the best approach to presenting `science' in that science is a body of theories and explained phenomena the understanding of which facilitates applying knowledge to understanding new situations. So, if a book just answers questions, the ability to extend the answers to new situations may not be as good as other expository approaches. That said, I have to say that like Robert L. Wolke's `What Einstein told His Chef', this book may be more accessible to many readers than other conventional writers on the subject such as Harold McGee's works and `The Science of Cooking' by Bristol University (UK) don Peter Barham.

One thing a widely read foodie may want to consider is that they may have already seen most of the material in this book in the volumes cited above. This is not to say this book does not contain some new material, but a devoted reader of Shirley Corriher and Alton Brown may find this new material a bit sparse.

For the reader with little experience with food science reading, I caution you that there are some statements in this book, which are scientifically incorrect. This may be a small point, since the errors are not likely to interfere with your practical cooking, but they may interfere with your ability to extend your knowledge to new situations, which is the whole point of the scientific inquiry in the first place. The first error I noticed is the statement that when a water / alcohol mixture is boiled, the alcohol will all boil off, leaving just water. One of the first things a freshman chemistry student learns is that this is not true. It is true that more alcohol will evaporate than water, until the alcohol and water attain equilibrium. Admittedly, the alcohol will be reduced to a very small level, but it is still there. This is important if someone has physical or religious problems with any alcohol. The second error I noticed is the use of the term `dissolved' when referring to the mixing of flour with water. The proper term here is `suspension', not `solution'. In some ways, this is a more serious error, as suspensions behave much differently than solutions, and the two states are pervasive in cooking techniques, so it is important to know the differences in behavior between the two states.

After all that nit picking, I can still recommend this as a really worthwhile source of information whereby one can improve your cooking, especially for the reasonable paperback price. One especially valuable feature of this book is the excellent bibliography which gives references for all the authors and works mentioned above except for Alton Brown, and a whole lot more.

If you really need to have fun with your reading about food science, I recommend `The Cook Book Decoder or Culinary Alchemy Explained' by retired Canadian professor of Chemistry, Arthur E. Grosser. This book has the added virtue of being great to pass food knowledge on to kids.

The claim to `science' in this book's title is a bit tarnished, but if you are new to foodie science, this book will give you lots of useful information and tell you how to avoid a lot of kitchen pitfalls.
Gela Gela
a must read at Johnson and Wales when I was there..and with thirty years under my belt...my bible...It once was lost but now is found..this book is a bible to a chef and a wonderful go to book to any professional who's second passion is cooking...
Rivik Rivik
Fast shipping, good quality!
Gajurus Gajurus
I like it
THOMAS THOMAS
This book was recommended to me by a chef, and now I give as gifts to friends who are passionate about food.

"The New Kitchen Science" is a brilliant book that offers helpful and fascinating facts about cooking, while still being an easy read.
Eta Eta
This is a really interesting book filled with interesting, useful and fun information. No need to be a rocket scientist in order to learn these facts.
This book is a cyclopedia of how stuff works in the kitchen. It is written in question-and-answer format, addressing numerous kitchen topic, like "Which is better, rock or sea salt?" and "What's wrong with farmed fishes?". The book is divided into chapters addressing cooking equipment, cooking methods, meats, seafood, dairy products, eggs, fruits and vegetables, sauces and thickeners, seasonings, oils and fats, baking, beverages, food storage, health and nutrition, and diets. It includes a list of references for further reading, and index. It is clearly not a cookbook, but there are a few recipes for basic home cooking scattered here and there for illustration of principles.

This book would make a handy kitchen reference. Want to know the different cooking and nutritional properties of various oils? Check the tables found in this book. Trying to choose some new cookware for your kitchen? Read this book, and you'll learn why professional chefs prefer stainless steel pots with copper bottoms for many kitchen tasks. A few topics are covered superficially, such as vegetarian diets, where the author notes that vegetarians can get all essential amino acids through combining different foods at meals, but he doesn't note that getting enough vitamin B12 while avoiding animal products requires extra effort. While most of the information is up-to-date, perhaps a few articles could do with some revisions, such as the entry on taste buds, in which Hillman describes the old theory on the zone distribution of taste buds, which recent research has put into question.