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eBook Food in Missouri: A Cultural Stew (Missouri Heritage Readers) ePub

eBook Food in Missouri: A Cultural Stew (Missouri Heritage Readers) ePub

by Madeline Matson

  • ISBN: 0826209602
  • Category: Regional and International
  • Subcategory: Cooking
  • Author: Madeline Matson
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: University of Missouri; First edition (May 1, 1994)
  • Pages: 168
  • ePub book: 1539 kb
  • Fb2 book: 1782 kb
  • Other: mbr lrf doc mobi
  • Rating: 4.7
  • Votes: 768

Description

Corn, squash, and beans from the Native Americans; barbecue sauces from the Spanish; potatoes and sausages from the Germans: Missouri's foods include a bountiful variety of ingredients.

Food in Missouri book. See a Problem? We’d love your help. Corn, squash, and beans from the Native Americans; barbecue sauces.

As a companion volume to their earlier book, Called to Courage: Four Women in Missouri History. Margot Ford McMillen is an instructor at Westminster College in Fulton, Missouri. She is the author or coauthor of several books, including Paris, Tightwad, and Peculiar: Missouri Place Names (University of Missouri Press). Heather Roberson is a student at the University of California–Berkeley and is coauthor, with Margot Ford McMillen, of Called to Courage: Four Women in Missouri History (University of Missouri Press). Series: Missouri Heritage Readers (Book 1).

University of Missouri Press. College Woman's Cook Book (Cooking in America) Minnesota Kid's Cookbook: Recipes, How-To, History. College Woman's Cook Book (Cooking in America) Minnesota Kid's Cookbook: Recipes, How-To, History, Lore and More.

Food in Missouri : A Cultural Stew (Missouri Heritage Readers). From Knights to Pioneers : One German Family in Westphalia and Missouri

Food in Missouri : A Cultural Stew (Missouri Heritage Readers). From Knights to Pioneers : One German Family in Westphalia and Missouri. Fun With the Family in Missouri : Hundreds of Ideas for Day Trips With the Kids (2nd Ed). German Settlement in Missouri : New Land, Old Ways (Missouri Heritage Readers Series). Hardship and Hope : Missouri Women Writing About Their Lives, 1820-1920.

Food in Missouri: A Cultural Stew. Missouri heritage readers. University of Missouri Press. p. 17. ISBN 978-0-8262-0960-3. Retrieved 2018-08-19.

Religion in Missouri. Missouri is an overwhelmingly Protestant region, with Baptist being the largest denomination by far. Methodist and Presbyterian are also large Protestant groups. The state has a fairly large Catholic population, along with smaller groups of Jewish, Eastern, and Muslim populations. About The World Travel Guide. The World Travel Guide (WTG) is the flagship digital consumer brand within the Columbus Travel Media portfolio. A comprehensive guide to the world’s best travel destinations, its print heritage stretches back more than 30 years, with the online portal reaching its 20-year anniversary in 2019.

Missouri stayed with the Union north during the Civil War, but saw only guerilla-style fighting between the two sides. There is a wide mix of culture in Missouri thanks to its traditional role as a gateway for migrants heading west. The railroad opened up even more trade potential for Missouri, adding to its river commerce. Both St Louis and Kansas City boomed as a result of the business generated by the railroads in the late 1800s. The south is covered by the Ozark Mountains, the Lake of the Ozarks and most of the big national parks. This blend of outdoor adventure and unique Ozark culture has made the southern region of Missouri popular with all kinds of travelers.

Category:Missouri culture. This category has the following 31 subcategories, out of 31 total.

Missouri - Food Culture. Contact Us. Get in Touch.

Corn, squash, and beans from the Native Americans; barbecue sauces from the Spanish; potatoes and sausages from the Germans: Missouri's foods include a bountiful variety of ingredients. In Food in Missouri: A Cultural Stew, Madeline Matson takes readers on an enticing journey through the history of this state's food, from the hunting and farming methods of the area's earliest inhabitants, through the contributions of the state's substantial African American population, to the fast-food purveyors of the microwave age.

Tracing the history of food preparation, preservation, and marketing, while highlighting the cultural traditions that engendered each change, Matson shows how advances in farming methods, the invention of the electric range, the development of cookbooks, and three waves of immigration have profoundly influenced what Missourians eat today. Along the way, she highlights some of the key people, places, and institutions in Missouri's food history: Irma S. Rombauer, author of Joy of Cooking; Stark Bro's Nurseries and Orchards in Louisiana, Missouri, the largest family-owned fruit-tree nursery in the world and the home of Delicious, Golden Delicious, and Gala apples; St. Louis's Soulard Market, established in 1779 and said to be the oldest public market west of the Mississippi; and Stone Hill Winery, a leader in Hermann's nationally recognized wine- making industry.

By bringing to life the traditions behind the foods we eat every day, Food in Missouri provides a unique perspective on the people who explored and settled the state, showing that Missouri's rich heritage truly is a cultural stew.