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eBook Knowledge and Money: Research Universities and the Paradox of the Marketplace ePub

eBook Knowledge and Money: Research Universities and the Paradox of the Marketplace ePub

by Roger L. Geiger

  • ISBN: 0804749256
  • Category: Schools and Teaching
  • Subcategory: Education
  • Author: Roger L. Geiger
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Stanford University Press; 1 edition (May 4, 2004)
  • Pages: 336
  • ePub book: 1666 kb
  • Fb2 book: 1613 kb
  • Other: lit lrf lrf doc
  • Rating: 4.5
  • Votes: 238

Description

Overall, I found this book informative and in the main lively. It is not prose on a par with some of the more polemical writers in the field but well worth reading nevertheless.

The book begins by chronicling how universities have enlarged revenues by optimizing tuitions, and how they have managed these funds. Overall, I found this book informative and in the main lively.

The book begins by chronicling how universities have enlarged revenues by optimizing tuitions, and how they have managed these funds.

Roger L. Geiger is Distinguished Professor of Higher Education at Penn State University

The book begins by chronicling how universities have enlarged revenues by optimizing tuitions, and how they have managed these funds. Roger L. Geiger is Distinguished Professor of Higher Education at Penn State University.

The book begins by chronicling how universities have enlarged revenues by optimizing tuitions, and how they have managed.

Knowledge and Money book. Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read

Knowledge and Money book. Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read.

Yet they also have exaggerated inequalities, diminished the university's control over its own activities, and weakened the university's mission of serving the public.

Knowledge and Money also sounds a number of timely alarms as it points to the increasing wealth of the families of. . It reveals why competition for the best students through selective undergraduate admissions has led to increased student consumerism.

The thoroughness, judiciousness, and clarity of this book make it the gold standard on the subject. Encyclopedic in coverage, The History of American Higher Education commands more information, scholarship, and analysis than any other work of its kind. Geiger is the acknowledged leader in the field. -James Axtell, author of The Making of Princeton University: From Woodrow Wilson to the Present.

Market forces have profoundly affected the contemporary research university's fundamental tasks of creating and disseminating knowledge. They arguably have provided American universities access to greater wealth, better students, and stronger links with the economy. Yet they also have exaggerated inequalities, diminished the university's control over its own activities, and weakened the university's mission of serving the public. Incorporating twenty years of research and new data covering 99 research universities, Knowledge and Money explains this paradox by assessing how market forces have affected universities in four key spheres of activity: finance, undergraduate education, primary research, and participation in regional and national economic development. The book begins by chronicling how universities have enlarged revenues by optimizing tuitions, and how they have managed these funds. It reveals why competition for the best students through selective undergraduate admissions has led to increased student consumerism and weakened university control over learning. The book also explains why research has become an increasingly autonomous activity within the university, expanding faster than class instruction or faculty resources. Finally, it shows how the linkage of research to economic development has engendered closer ties with industry and encouraged the commercialization of knowledge.

Comments

Saithi Saithi
This book is not as hyperbolic as others touching on the same themes It is more measured and thorough across a range of contentious themes defining the university-industry interface. Readers familiar with work by Bloom, Nussbaum and Slaughter and Leslie (to mention a few) will be familiar with the wailings of liberal arts protectionists. Gieger is refreshing unemotive about such issues. His concerns are teasing out the expression and impact of competition and consumerism in the universities over students and research.

It is a book replete with interesting and arresting stats and arguments, and I won't pretend to do justice to it here. However, his analysis of the connection between student retention rates, inter university competition and student consumerism will resonate with most academics' experiences of their teaching environment. Interestingly, Gieger also mulls over the growing disconnection of research institutes from the educational core mission of universities. The periphery and centre are no longer in communion - a point becoming more obvious by the day. As he points out, criticism that classroom instruction is 'falling behind' is grounded largely in the mistaken supposition that periphery and core are in communion. The weakest part of the book, in my opinion the main blemish, is the last chapter dealing with universities and the markets. It is a bit vague and rambling with the the odd dollop of personal judgement thrown into the mix. For instance, Gieger asserts that the research market is 'beautifully efficient' (p 249). Not everyone would agree with this statement nor that efficiency equals either value for money nor utility. He does conclude this chapter by upbraiding the universities for not investing heavily enough in teaching, and not emphasising that a degree of insulation from commercial activity is desirable. Nevertheless, the chapter is composed of a lot of sections beginning, Firtsly, Secondly, Thirdly, ... lending a list structure to the text suggesting a hurried approach that jars with the rest of the work.

Overall, I found this book informative and in the main lively. It is not prose on a par with some of the more polemical writers in the field but well worth reading nevertheless.
Dibei Dibei
"Knowledge & Money" is a comprehensive, but long read! You should really love the concept of how research institutions have become profit centers at the expense of tax payers to appreciate its insights. It is an eye opening account of how the education industry has gone from "learning for the sake of learning" to the selling of education to the highest bidder. A real world treatise on how education, the last bastion of morality, has become a part of the marketing mix for corporate profits.

Edward Brown
Core Edge Image & Charisma Institute, Inc.