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eBook No Disposable Kids ePub

eBook No Disposable Kids ePub

by Arlin Ness,Martin Mitchell,Larry K. Brendtro

  • ISBN: 1932127313
  • Category: Schools and Teaching
  • Subcategory: Education
  • Author: Arlin Ness,Martin Mitchell,Larry K. Brendtro
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Solution Tree (November 1, 2004)
  • Pages: 214
  • ePub book: 1719 kb
  • Fb2 book: 1248 kb
  • Other: azw doc txt lrf
  • Rating: 4.7
  • Votes: 945

Description

No Disposable Kids is based on the authors groundbreaking work at Starr Commonwealth, a private, non-profit service organization that works for the betterment of children. No Disposable Kids has been added to your Cart.

No Disposable Kids is based on the authors groundbreaking work at Starr Commonwealth, a private, non-profit service organization that works for the betterment of children.

No Disposable Kids book. Brendtro, Ness, and Mitchell challenge the notion of any child being too far gone to be helped. Starr Commonwealth is nationally recognized for outstanding results.

by Larry K. Brendtro, Arlin Ness, Martin Mitchell. ISBN 9781932127317 (978-1-932127-31-7) Softcover, Solution Tree, 2004. Find signed collectible books: 'No Disposable Kids'. Founded in 1997, BookFinder.

Larry K. Brendtro is the author of 16 books and over 200 articles in the . Kids Who Outwit Adults, John R Seita, Larry Brendtro, 2002 Sopris West. No Disposable Kids by Larry Brendtro, Arlin E. Ness, Martin Mitchell and Starr Commonwealth, 2001 Sopris West. Brendtro is the author of 16 books and over 200 articles in the field of positive youth development and trains youth professionals worldwide. Reclaiming Youth at Risk: Our Hope for the Future by Larry K. Brendtro, Martin Brokenleg, Steve Van Bockern, National Education Service 1992.

From the back cover: Educational literature is replete with evidence that the most respected, effective educators are those who treat students respectfully. Each chapter of the book starts by telling more of Tony's story (the authors use the pseudonym Tony for the alleged arsonist), followed by a broader discussion of similar behavior problems some kids develop.

No Disposable Kids is based on the authors groundbreaking work at Starr Commonwealth, a private, non-profit service organization that works for the betterment o. .by Larry K.

Urie Bronfenbrenner was a deeply compassionate man committed to the belief that there are no disposable children (Brendtro, Ness, & Mitchell, 2005 Bronfenbrenner, 2005).

Current educational and juvenile justice systems rely greatly on punishment and power over strategies- especially when faced with youth whose severe behaviors escalate to violence. Urie Bronfenbrenner was a deeply compassionate man committed to the belief that there are no disposable children (Brendtro, Ness, & Mitchell, 2005 Bronfenbrenner, 2005). 2 The student was Laurence Steinberg of Temple University. The Vision of Urie Bronfenbrenner: Adults Who Are Crazy about Kids.

No Disposable Kids Brendtro, Larry, Ness, Arlin . Mitchell, Martin, Starr Com.

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References Brendtro, . Ness, A. and Mitchell, M. (2005). Bloomington, IN: National Educational Service. Norman: University of Oklahoma Book Exchange.

Urie Bronfenbrenner (1917-2005) was a pioneer in studying the behavior of children in their natural life space of family, school, peer group, and community. His concept of the ecology of human development is transforming practice for effective work with children and youth. References Brendtro, . Brendtro, L. and Ness, A. (1983). Re-educating troubled youth: Environments for teaching and treatment. New York: Walter du Gruyter. Steinberg, L. The most unpretentious scholar.

No Disposable Kids is based on the authors groundbreaking work at Starr Commonwealth, a private, non-profit service organization that works for the betterment of children, teens, and families by operating a range of educational and treatment programs for court-ordered youths. Starr Commonwealth is nationally recognized for outstanding results. Each year, Starr Commonwealth programs help more than 6,000 children and families. Throughout the book, the authors provide support for their strategies with powerful real-life stories from their experiences at Starr. The authors believe, as educational research has long shown, that the most effective educators are those who treat students respectfully. Yet current systems in education rely greatly on punishment and strategies that promote power over students. At a time when many are pessimistic about problems facing youth, the authors contend that schools and communities can help all children thrive and succeed. Brendtro, Ness, and Mitchell challenge the notion of any child being too far gone to be helped. They provide insight into the world of these youths by sharing strategies drawn from the best resiliency models and their success with actual cases at Starr Commonwealth. By reframing rebellious acts as signs of resilience, the authors uncover the natural self-righting tendencies of youths who face adverse circumstances.

Comments

Uafrmaine Uafrmaine
Inspired by a famous statue of Janusz Korczak at the Children’s Memorial at Yad Vashem, the title “No Disposable Kids” came to the authors. Dr. Korczak founded an orphanage in Warsaw, Poland, for troubled Jewish street youth. Even in the Warsaw Ghetto, Janusz Korczak refused to abandoned “his” children, choosing to accompany them in the protest of quiet dignity to the gas chambers of Treblinka. Of course, Yad Vashem itself is a memorial of one of the darkest moments in history, the Holocaust, of which one-quarter of its civilian victims were children.

Nowadays, many troubled children and teens with challenging behavior problems are being written off The authors, of Starr Commonwealth, in the same spirit refuse to abandoned the children in their care. School disciplinary and juvenile justice systems too often rely on punishment, using power to control youngsters who are already rebelling because they feel they have no control. This alienation, in an environment that does not respect these children, leads to trouble, via several pathways:

• Hostile parenting in a toxic family environment, often as a result of economic and society pressures, family issues, and alcohol abuse
• Cultures of disrespect in school, society, and peer groups, with all the negative messages children experience
• Cycles of hostility created by a childhood where there is a lack of love and caring or, even worse, neglect and abuse
• Ridicule and bullying in school
• Negative peer cultures in antisocial groups such as gangs comprising troubled teens in need of acceptance
• Lives interrupted from moving from home to home, school to school
• Negative or morbid thoughts from clinical or situational depression.

In short, “children who hurt can become children who hate.” As such, punishment will only exacerbate the hurt and behavioral consequences. In addition, retribution rhetoric “becomes a false expression of masculinity and courage,” a form of demonizing youth rooted in sexism and enforced by fear, a form of violence. Jane Addams wrote about the terrible conditions of the juvenile justice system at the turn of the last century. In this book, the authors clearly spell out what is wrong with society, politics, schools, and the criminal justice system, exposing all the false beliefs and propaganda perpetuated by self-serving adults. And too much of psychology is fixated on flaws and conditions and that these defined pathologies must be fixed or cured. In short, “approaches that are repressive in character rather than reconstructive cannot succeed.”

What adults involved with children who are troubled need to do is to shift from a problem-based paradigm to one that focuses on opportunity. The authors chronicle forward-thinking educators, from Johann Pestalozzi to Janusz Korczak to Ennis William Cosby, with a great deal of research in between. What they share in common are:

• Environments of respect where children and adolescents can thrive and grow with dignity
• Connections by means of support and guidance through strong, positive relationships
• Continuity, defined by a timeline sequence of antecedents, behavior, and consequences, with the aim of breaking the conflict cycle, where conflict escalates and leads to problem behavior
• Dignity, emphasizing significance, competence, influence, and virtue
• Opportunity, which is where the Circle of Courage comes in, consisting of four core principles for nurturing troubled children in a climate of respect of dignity: belonging, mastery, independence, and generosity.

The aim is to build on children’s strengths; the fourth and final chapter discusses specific ways within the context of the Circle of Courage, introduced here and in an earlier work, Reclaiming Youth at Risk. With empathy, understanding, and a positive philosophy of dignity and respect, there will not be any allowance for “disposable” children.
Ironrunner Ironrunner
Fantastic book. It's an easy read and provides great insight into working with students who haven't been successful in the traditional education setting.