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eBook Keeping Track: How Schools Structure Inequality ePub

eBook Keeping Track: How Schools Structure Inequality ePub

by Jeannie Oakes

  • ISBN: 0300032927
  • Category: Schools and Teaching
  • Subcategory: Education
  • Author: Jeannie Oakes
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Yale University Press; 1st edition (September 10, 1985)
  • Pages: 231
  • ePub book: 1874 kb
  • Fb2 book: 1849 kb
  • Other: mobi mbr doc lrf
  • Rating: 4.8
  • Votes: 789

Description

Jeannie Oakes's new book arrives just in time to let us know what tracking has actually accomplished in American . Jeannie Oakes has made a career out of studying in-school stratification.

Jeannie Oakes's new book arrives just in time to let us know what tracking has actually accomplished in American education and what its impact has been on students and society. Oakes demonstrates, with substantial evidence, that students have radically different and unequal schooling experiences depending on their race and social class. The book is loaded with interesting illustrations, but it's also surprisingly short on statistical rigor.

Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read. Start by marking Keeping Track: How Schools Structure Inequality as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read.

Tracking-the system of grouping students for instruction on the basis of ability-reflects the class and racial inequalities of American society and helps to perpetuate them. In the junior and senior high schools studied, there were clear differences between upper and lower tracks in: (1) content and quality of instruction, (2) teacher-student and student-student relationships, (3) expectations of teachers for their students, and (4) affective climate of classrooms. After chapters presenting the destructive and unfair consequences of tracking, this book discusses the findings.

Ability grouping in education. New Haven, CT : Yale University Press. Books for People with Print Disabilities. Internet Archive Books. Gutierres on September 9, 2011. SIMILAR ITEMS (based on metadata).

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On Jan 1, 2005, Jeannie Oakes and others published Keeping track: How schools structure inequality. This might also affect how peer relations are formed, specifically the prominence of school misconduct for friendship selection.

This might also affect how peer relations are formed, specifically the prominence of school misconduct for friendship selection. Classroom ability composition and the role of academic performance and school misconduct in the formation of academic and friendship networks.

In her 1985 book, Keeping Track: How Schools Structure Inequality, Jeannie Oakes makes a compelling argument that grouping students in schools based on perceived ability is a reflection of the class.

In her 1985 book, Keeping Track: How Schools Structure Inequality, Jeannie Oakes makes a compelling argument that grouping students in schools based on perceived ability is a reflection of the clas. In her 1985 book, Keeping Track: How Schools Structure Inequality, Jeannie Oakes makes a compelling argument that grouping students in schools based on perceived ability is a reflection of the class and racial inequalities that exist in American society and actually keeps these divides alive.

Tracking, Oakes Study: 38 schools across the US, & 300 classrooms. Oakes decided to look at: knowledge and skills, learning activities, -curriculum content, instructional quality, and classroom climate.

In 1985, Jeannie Oakes published Keeping Track: How Schools Structure Inequality, probably the most important .

In 1985, Jeannie Oakes published Keeping Track: How Schools Structure Inequality, probably the most important book of this century on the detrimental effects of streaming high school students into ability groups. Tracking is the process whereby students are divided into categories so they can be assigned to various kinds of classes based on intellectual ability; usually "advanced," "average," or "slow.

Selected by the American School Board Journal a "Must Read" book when it was first published and named one of 60 "Books of the Century" by the University of South Carolina Museum of Education for its influence on American education, this provocative, carefully documented work shows how taking--"reflects the class and racial inequalities of American society and helps I perpetuate them. For his new edition, Jennies Oaks has added a new Pre force and two new chapters in which she discusses the "tracking wars" of the last twenty years.wars in which Keeping hand has played a central role.

Comments

Leyl Leyl
This book, though dated, still holds up well. It's the best source on why tracking of students in school is harmful to many and limits the possibilities for our students to be all they can be.
Cobyno Cobyno
I ordinarily don't review books, but I have to say that I would definitely qualify this one for the bonfire pile. The author provides a decent history of the factory model of education in the U.S. since its "modern" inception, but pretends to have data to back up the rest of her points. Having been in the sciences, I expect to see scientific methods used, statistical information such as deviations and chi-square factors, etc. However, this book showed me that if someone wishes, they can easily manipulate data from a rigged experiment, so narrowly chosen out of the widest spectrum of educational environments to "prove" a point. I'm surprised my professor at the time assigned this book, and he learned to regret it when people more outspoken than myself voiced our concerns. Simply put, you can't apply a one-size-fits-all approach/model which worked in one population from one chosen school to use everywhere. Typical pseudo-science and wasteful ways to promote how to better educate our students. Tracking IS still done, regardless of how it's labeled, and it's repercussions are greater than ever. Tracking feeds those non-educators that find themselves in charge of education, using their business models (which, ironically, use tracking of employees all the time!).

We live in a world where parents often take less responsibility for their children's educational outcome, choosing instead to make excuses for the lack of advancement (Blame The Teacher is the name of the game, folks, no matter how good the teacher is), so this book was yet another disappointment. Try throwing the author's suggested principles at the inner-city, crumbling edifices where even the cops are wary, and see if it works. Fat chance. You can't tell me that tracking isn't a useful tool that doesn't yield data or tell a good educator how to differentiate their work. Forcibly tossing students of varied levels together to do an assignment usually REDUCES overall productivity, so CTT models are garbage as well. I'd recommend avoiding this book at all costs unless you want to know what NOT to use in your arsenal of educational techniques.
Gindian Gindian
When embarking on any study of ability grouping, its root causes and affects on student learning it is important to read this book as well as Oake's other research articles on the subject. As painful as some teachers find changing practices deeply rooted in their own educational experiences this is one that is long overdue and deeply necessary if we are ever going to give all students fair access to educational and socioeconomic opportunity. Additional authors who must also be read are Anne wheelock, Jo Boaler, and Dweck.
Giamah Giamah
My school district has recently changed our middle school from homogeneous grouping of classes to heterogeneous based mainly on the works of Ms. Oakes. The effects have been disastrous to say the least with large numbers of misplaced and failing lower achievement level students. After reading "keeping Track" I came to the conclusion that Ms. Oakes has not spent much (if any) time teaching actual K-12 classes. If you are a teacher in the real world you will probably agree with my assessment. Her conclusion that we should all just merrily follow the model of cooperative learning (she gives no actual successful examples of how this will really improve learning) and it will fix everything , just reinforced my belief that she basically doesn't know what she is talking about. Unfortunately many school districts have become followers of her teachings and have radically changed their structures to heterogeneity. Of course, Ms. Oakes has made money and these school districts have saved a bundle on this philosophy. I recommend reading this book if for no other purpose than to open your eyes to the dangers of listening to the purveyors of ignorance that abound in the field of education.