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eBook Investing in College: A Guide for the Perplexed ePub

eBook Investing in College: A Guide for the Perplexed ePub

by Malcolm Getz

  • ISBN: 0674024648
  • Category: Schools and Teaching
  • Subcategory: Education
  • Author: Malcolm Getz
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Harvard University Press (March 30, 2007)
  • Pages: 304
  • ePub book: 1195 kb
  • Fb2 book: 1686 kb
  • Other: mobi lrf txt azw
  • Rating: 4.6
  • Votes: 191

Description

Fortunately, Getz can and does. He's very realistic about what you get for your investment in college dollars. Definitely I would recommend this book to any parent who's looking at a very expensive college investment.

Fortunately, Getz can and does. He's got some of the best advice for choosing a college, such as, "Don't get overly enthused about small classes. He notes (correctly) that the percentage of part-time faculty can influence the quality of education at a university - something few non-faculty folks will realize. I'm impressed that Getz recognizes the role of athletics on post-college success. It's nice to have a book that respects the value of education but maintains perspective.

Investing in College book. Start by marking Investing in College: A Guide for the Perplexed as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read.

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What do the rankings really mean? Is it wise to choose the most prestigious school a student can get into? What are the payoffs of higher education, and, by the way, how do we pay for them? Product Identifiers.

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Coauthors & Alternates.

Investing in College: A Guide for the Perplexed: ISBN 9780674030466 (978-0-674-03046-6) Softcover, Harvard University Press, 2008. by Donald Stevenson Watson, Malcolm Getz. Coauthors & Alternates.

Shrewd and sensible, Investing in College is an invaluable resource and a beacon of sanity for college-bound . This book offers a very unique angle to the college selection process, like no other college guide book I've read

Shrewd and sensible, Investing in College is an invaluable resource and a beacon of sanity for college-bound students and the families who support them. See all Product description. This book offers a very unique angle to the college selection process, like no other college guide book I've read. It helps families identify and integrate all the different pieces of information that go into the final decision (like rankings, financial costs, the quality of specific programs of interest) and helps weigh these different factors intelligently in terms of importance and eventual financial payoff.

Malcolm Getz - Investing in College: A Guide for the Perplexed. Malcolm Godwin - The Lucid Dreamer - a Waking Guide for the Traveler Between Worlds.

Abstract If colleges and universities periodically operate at unexpected enrollment levels, measured costs may reflect short-run rather than long-run minimum .

Abstract If colleges and universities periodically operate at unexpected enrollment levels, measured costs may reflect short-run rather than long-run minimum average costs for different levels o. More). Preface 1. Introduction: The High Cost of Higher Education 2. Financial Returns: Does College Pay Off? 3. Career Opportunities: The Choices that Matter 4. College Rank: The Pitfalls of Prestige . (More).

College education is one of the most important investments a family will make. But between the viewbooks, websites, insider gossip, and magazine rankings, students and their worried parents face a dizzying array of options. What do the rankings really mean? Is it wise to choose the most prestigious school a student can get into? What are the payoffs of higher education, and, by the way, how do we pay for them?

In a unique approach to these conundrums, an economist and award-winning teacher walks readers through the opportunities, risks, and rewards of heading off to college. Warning against the pitfalls of numerical rankings, Malcolm Getz poses questions to guide a student toward not necessarily the best college but the right one. Famous professors suggest quality--but do they teach undergraduates? Are smaller classes always better? When is a state university the best deal around?

In a concise overview of decades of research, Getz reviews findings on the long-term returns of college education in different careers, from law to engineering, from nursing to financial management. Sorting through personal, professional, and institutional variables, he helps families determine when paying $40,000 a year might make sense, and when it merely buys an expensive rear window decal. He breaks down the formidable admissions game into strategies to improve the odds of acceptance, and he offers tips on tax breaks, subsidized loans, federal grants, 529 accounts, merit scholarships, and much more.

Shrewd and sensible, Investing in College is an invaluable resource and a beacon of sanity for college-bound students and the families who support them.

Comments

BORZOTA BORZOTA
As a career consultant, I work mostly with professionals who are midlife and mid-career. Those with children often take for granted the need to "invest" in their children's education, often sacrificing their own lives, careers and retirement.

As a former college professor and holder of multiple degrees, I enjoyed the experience of high quality universities. But I agree with the author's premise: students and their families often over-invest in college, believing that they can buy their children's future happiness. Recently I talked to a woman in my gym, visiting from another state, whose daughter was agonizing over a choice among 3 lower-tier colleges. I wanted to tell her, "Choose the cheapest and frankly, you're just as well off at a state university."

I couldn't say this. Fortunately, Getz can and does. He's very realistic about what you get for your investment in college dollars. He's got some of the best advice for choosing a college, such as, "Don't get overly enthused about small classes." He notes (correctly) that the percentage of part-time faculty can influence the quality of education at a university - something few non-faculty folks will realize.

I'm impressed that Getz recognizes the role of athletics on post-college success. Athletes tend to be achievement oriented, confident and likeable. They may get lower grades but they have qualities that are valued by most of the world and that are rewarded with real dollars.

Of course, no book can include everything. Getz notes the value of high achieving peers, who can be found at competitive universities. At my own highly competitive undergraduate institution, these peer relationships sometimes backfired. Some high achievers coast through college (having experienced awesome high schools). Others have high intensity problems as well as achievements. Most important, some students become intimidated by competition and never achieve their potential.

Second, I've never talked to anyone who considered the alumni association when choosing a college. But let's face it: you spend 4 or 5 years as a student and a lifetime as an alum. Because I attended a New York college, my reunions took place in the Big Apple -- always a treat. But for some reason, my alumni association never offered practical help for mentoring and networking. Today's alums might be different. I'd definitely take a look at alums and make a point of talking to some.

Finally, I am impressed with the students Getz met. They seem to have a strong sense of who they are and what they need. Many students I met as a student and teacher were far less confident and self-aware.

Definitely I would recommend this book to any parent who's looking at a very expensive college investment. It's nice to have a book that respects the value of education but maintains perspective. Once you graduate and get out in the "real world," you find the real achievers come from a diverse range of universities...and some from no university at all.
GAMER GAMER
This book offers a very unique angle to the college selection process, like no other college guide book I've read. It helps families identify and integrate all the different pieces of information that go into the final decision (like rankings, financial costs, the quality of specific programs of interest) and helps weigh these different factors intelligently in terms of importance and eventual financial payoff. I've recommended it to all of my friends and coworkers with college bound teens. It's an easy read, too.