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eBook Listening Myths: Applying Second Language Research to Classroom Teaching ePub

eBook Listening Myths: Applying Second Language Research to Classroom Teaching ePub

by Steven Brown

  • ISBN: 0472034596
  • Category: Schools and Teaching
  • Subcategory: Education
  • Author: Steven Brown
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: University of Michigan Press ELT (February 25, 2011)
  • Pages: 208
  • ePub book: 1521 kb
  • Fb2 book: 1325 kb
  • Other: txt rtf lrf lrf
  • Rating: 4.7
  • Votes: 806

Description

Steven Brown's Listening Myths has won the College English Association of Ohio's 2014 Nancy Dasher Award. Used this for a UNL grad class focused on teaching Listening and Reading in the German classroom.

Steven Brown's Listening Myths has won the College English Association of Ohio's 2014 Nancy Dasher Award. The qualifications for the award are: · The book must be scholarly. The book must provide an original contribution to the field. The author must live and work in Ohio. A very user friendly and readable text, refreshing from dry journal articles. One person found this helpful.

Listening Myths book. Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read.

John Benjamins, pp. 29–49. The article includes a discussion of the implications of the study for classroom teaching and current theories of communicative competence. Brown, S. and J. Larson-Hall. University of Michigan Press. Interaction, acculturation, and the acquisition of communicative competence: A case study of an adult.

do?id 2132445 Michigan ELT, 2011.

Non-Linguists, Please Stop Trying to Do or Talk About Linguistics Without the Help of Actual Linguists. Do some academics look down on other academics as well as non-academics? Free Learning How to Learn MOOC on Coursera.

This webpage is a summary of the above-mentioned book by Keith Folse, currently Associate Professor of TESOL at the University of. .The core of the book is a discussion of eight myths about learning and teaching vocabulary

This webpage is a summary of the above-mentioned book by Keith Folse, currently Associate Professor of TESOL at the University of Central Florida. Using word lists to learn L2 vocabulary is unproductive. Presenting new vocabulary in semantic sets facilitates learning. The use of translations to learn new vocabulary should be discouraged.

Steven Brown, Jenifer Larson-Hall. It's also an excellent resource for practicing teachers.

We should test only one skill at a time.

The myths examined in this book are: Assessment is just writing tests and using statistics. A comprehensive final exam is the best way to evaluate students. We should test only one skill at a time. A test's validity can be determined by looking at it. Issues of fairness are not a concern with standardized testing. Teachers should never be involved in preparing students for tests.

Portsmouth, NH: Heinle & Heinle. 89. Rodby, J. (1992). 19. Caragarajah, . Smitherman, . & Villanueva, V. (2003). 20. Canagarajah, A. S. (2002). A geopolitics of academic writing.

Part of the Michigan Education Myths Series).

This volume was conceived as a "best practices" resource for teachers of ESL listening courses in the way that Vocabulary Myths by Keith S. Folse (and Writing Myths by Joy Reid) is one for reading and vocabulary teachers. It was written to help ensure that teachers of listening are not perpetuating the myths of teaching listening.

Both the research and pedagogy in this book are based on the newest research in the field of second language acquisition. Steven Brown is the author of the Active Listening textbook series and is a teacher trainer.

The myths debunked in this book are:

§  Listening is the same as reading.

§  Listening is passive.

§  Listening equals comprehension.

§  Because L1 language ability is effortlessly acquired, L2 listening ability is too.

§  Listening means listening to conversations.

§  Listening is an individual, inside-the-head process.

§  Students should only listen to authentic materials.

§  Listening can’t be taught.

Comments

Mozel Mozel
Used this for a UNL grad class focused on teaching Listening and Reading in the German classroom. A very user friendly and readable text, refreshing from dry journal articles. Very nicely done book and helpful for the modern language teacher.
Wizard Wizard
Steve Brown has been a major contributor to the field of second language listening, through his presentations and classes, through his cutting-edge classroom materials, such as English Firsthand, and through his down-to-earth teacher training work, such as Listening Myths. Listening Myths is a very accessible, very personable, very entertaining work. It will be especially valuable for new teachers who need quick guidance on teaching approaches, but also appreciated by teacher trainers and researchers who want more background and insight into the key issues the book investigates.

Listening Myths is organized around eight popular "myths" - commonsensical and widely held beliefs that are at best faulty oversimplifications and at worst downright dangerous views when put into practice. The 8 myths (Listening is the same as reading. Listening is passive. Listening equals comprehension. Because L1 listening ability is required effortlessly, L2 listening ability is too. Listening means listening to conversations. Listening is an individual, inside-the-head process. Students should listen only to authentic materials. Listening can't be taught) are examined and deconstructed carefully. Brown shows that while each myth may contain a grain of truth, buying into the myths will lead to lazy thinking, and also to poor teaching and ineffective learning.

The book is brilliantly organized, weaving between the themes of research and application. Each chapter provides a section on "What the research says", including a summary table of relevant studies that have helped to debunk the particular myth. Each chapter concludes with a practical "What we can do" section that provides detailed clear guidelines that teachers can employ immediately to counter the myth in actual teaching situations.

Overall, I found Listening Myths to be refreshing, thorough, and up-to-date. Steve Brown has made a wonderful contribution to both research and teaching in this gem of a book!