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eBook The Ethical Function of Architecture (The MIT Press) ePub

eBook The Ethical Function of Architecture (The MIT Press) ePub

by Karsten Harries

  • ISBN: 026258171X
  • Category: Engineering
  • Subcategory: Engineering
  • Author: Karsten Harries
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: The MIT Press; Reprint edition (July 3, 1998)
  • Pages: 424
  • ePub book: 1314 kb
  • Fb2 book: 1510 kb
  • Other: docx txt lrf azw
  • Rating: 4.6
  • Votes: 818

Description

Established in 1962, the MIT Press is one of the largest and most distinguished university presses in the world and a leading . The Ethical Function of Architecture.

Established in 1962, the MIT Press is one of the largest and most distinguished university presses in the world and a leading publisher of books and journals at the intersection of science, technology, art, social science, and design.

The "ethical function" referred to in the title concerns architecture's ability to express the ethos of the society that . This is simply one of the best books I have ever read. On one level it is a critique of contemporary thinking about architecture.

The "ethical function" referred to in the title concerns architecture's ability to express the ethos of the society that produces it. Harries effectively demolishes the esthetic and functional approaches to architecture and makes a convincing argument that what distinguishes architecture from mere building is its ethical function. 4 people found this helpful. In the first part of the book Harries argues that the aesthetic approach to art doesn't do justice to the meaning and power of architecture.

Winner of the 8th Annual AIA International Architecture Book Award for ture help us find our place and way in today's complex world? Can it return individuals to awhole, to a world, to a community? Developing Giedion¹s claim that contemporary architecture's maintask is to interpret a way of life valid for our time, philosopher Karsten Harries answers thatarchitecture should serve a common ethos.

If the main task of architecture is indeed interpretation, in just what sense can it be. .Book Description The MIT Press 1998-09-02, Cambridge, Mass Stock Image. 10. Published by MIT Press 1998-09-02 (1998).

Architecture, Harries observes, has a responsibility to community; but its ethical function is inevitably also political. Book Description The MIT Press 1998-09-02, Cambridge, Mass.

The Ethical Function of Architecture (Cambridge, Mass. The Broken Frame: Three Lectures (Washington, . MIT, 1997), winner of the American Institute of Architects 8th Annual International Architecture Book Award for Criticism. The Bavarian Rococo Church: Between Faith and Aestheticism (New Haven: Yale, 1983). The Meaning of Modern Art (Evanston: Northwestern, 1968).

Publisher: MIT Press ISBN 13: 9780262581714. Author: Harries, Karsten ISBN 10: 026258171X. The Ethical Function of Architecture by Karsten Harries (Paperback, 1998). Brand new: lowest price.

Start by marking The Ethical Function of Architecture as Want to Read .

Start by marking The Ethical Function of Architecture as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read. In our splintered, individualist age he reminds us it is impossible to think without generalities.

In Dreams of Utopia, the penultimate chapter of The Ethical Function of Architecture, Karsten Harries quotes a familiar passage drafted by Walter Gropius in 1919 as a statement of modernity’s architectural faith. In Dreams of Utopia, the penultimate chapter of The Ethical Function of Architecture, Karsten Harries quotes a familiar passage drafted by Walter Gropius in 1919 as a statement of modernity’s architectural faith.

Can architecture help us find our place and way in today's complex world? Can it return individuals to a whole, to a world, to a community?

Can architecture help us find our place and way in today's complex world? Can it return individuals to a whole, to a world, to a community? Developing Giedion's claim that contemporary architecture's main task is to interpret a way of life valid for our time, philosopher Karsten Harries answers that architecture should serve a common ethos. But if architecture is to meet that task, it first has to free itself from the dominant formalist approach, and get beyond the notion that its purpose is to produce endless variations of the decorated shed.

Can architecture help us find our place and way in today's complex world? Can it return individuals to a whole, to a world, to a community? Developing Giedion's claim that contemporary architecture's main task is to interpret a way of life valid for our time, philosopher Karsten Harries answers that architecture should serve a common ethos. But if architecture is to meet that task, it first has to free itself from the dominant formalist approach, and get beyond the notion that its purpose is to produce endless variations of the decorated shed.

In a series of cogent and balanced arguments, Harries questions the premises on which architects and theorists have long relied―premises which have contributed to architecture's current identity crisis and marginalization. He first criticizes the aesthetic approach, focusing on the problems of decoration and ornament. He then turns to the language of architecture. If the main task of architecture is indeed interpretation, in just what sense can it be said to speak, and what should it be speaking about? Expanding upon suggestions made by Martin Heidegger, Harries also considers the relationship of building to the idea and meaning of dwelling.

Architecture, Harries observes, has a responsibility to community; but its ethical function is inevitably also political. He concludes by examining these seemingly paradoxical functions.

Comments

Hawk Flying Hawk Flying
Harries, a professor of philosophy at Yale, has a long-standing interest in architecture. (Disclosure- I took his course on the Philosophy of Architecture while a grad student in the early 80's.) Himself a student of Heidegger, Harries's work in architecture has largely been a reassessment and continuation of Heidegger's thought on technology and dwelling. The book under review is a summary of Harries's thinking on architecture. The "ethical function" referred to in the title concerns architecture's ability to express the ethos of the society that produces it. Harries effectively demolishes the esthetic and functional approaches to architecture and makes a convincing argument that what distinguishes architecture from mere building is its ethical function.
Gravelblade Gravelblade
Should have been called "The Function of Ethos in Architecture, and the Need to Return To It" -- nothing to do with ethics. Excellent and profound.
Ishnjurus Ishnjurus
the book was okay and at a very reasonable price and overall the artist has a lot of amazing work .
Gralsa Gralsa
This is one of the books I keep and read and reread. It has depths and many levels and has sparked off trains of thought of my own, as do the best books. It has a chapter, for instance, on Mold and Ruin. It speaks of the "war waged against straight lines." It speaks about "built ruins." Really I could go on and on but the short version is that as a non-architect, non-philosopher, I love this book.
Nahn Nahn
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This is simply one of the best books I have ever read.
On one level it is a critique of contemporary thinking about architecture. In the first part of the book Harries argues that the aesthetic approach to art doesn't do justice to the meaning and power of architecture. In the second part he argues that the semiotic approach to architecture is based on a model of language that cannot fully grasp and illuminate the symbolic dimension of architecture. In the third and fourth parts Harries tries to show that questions of architecture are ultimately questions of dwelling (broadly conceived), that questions of dwelling are irreducibly ethical and political, and that architecture thus has an irreducible ethical and political function.
On a deeper level the book is a critique of modern philosophies of art. Harries follows thinkers such as Heidegger, Gadamer, and Agamben in criticizing the aesthetic approach to art (which regards artworks simply as beautiful or interesting objects) and theoretical approaches to art (which regard artworks as the expression or illustration of ideas that can best be grasped and articulated with philosophical concepts). Harries argues that artworks have the power to illuminate the world and to call us back to what really matters, and that art is a (nontheoretical) way of responding to basic questions of human existence (How should we live? What does it mean to be human?)
Unlike Heidegger, Gadamer, and Agamben, however, Harries develops his arguments with a great number of specific, concrete examples drawn from the whole history of Western architecture and art. So while the book is philosophically ambitious, it is also exceptionally clear, sober, and down to earth.
Finally, I should note that the writing itself is beautiful--it is simple, precise, and conveys a sense of deep concentration and wonder.
The Ethical Function of Architecture won the American Institute of Architects 8th Annual International Architecture Book Award for Criticism. But it is about more than architecture. I recommend it very, very highly to anyone interested in Heidegger, phenomenology, aesthetics, ethics, poetry, literary theory, modernity and modernism, and the history and philosophy of art.
Windworker Windworker
this is a 'must' reading for anybody interested in architectural theory and philosophy ... but it goes way beyond, connecting ethics and aesthetics within a contemporary discourse that transcend post-modern, post-structuralist and phenomenologist biases. This is my third copy and i required it as a reading to all my students in architecture theory.