cdc-coteauxdegaronne
» » Overpotential: Fuel Cells, Futurism, and the Making of a Power Panacea (Studies in Modern Science, Technology, a)
eBook Overpotential: Fuel Cells, Futurism, and the Making of a Power Panacea (Studies in Modern Science, Technology, a) ePub

eBook Overpotential: Fuel Cells, Futurism, and the Making of a Power Panacea (Studies in Modern Science, Technology, a) ePub

by Matthew Eisler

  • ISBN: 0813551773
  • Category: Engineering
  • Subcategory: Engineering
  • Author: Matthew Eisler
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Rutgers University Press; First Edition,None edition (May 1, 2012)
  • Pages: 274
  • ePub book: 1630 kb
  • Fb2 book: 1978 kb
  • Other: lrf mobi lit azw
  • Rating: 4.6
  • Votes: 120

Description

In Overpotential, Matthew Eisler demonstrates that historians can and should contribute to the energy debate.

In Overpotential, Matthew Eisler demonstrates that historians can and should contribute to the energy debate. A major strength of the book is that it aims to - and largely does - bridge the gap between the fuel cell as history of technology and as present-day engineering and policy challenge. Technology and Culture).

MATTHEW N. EISLER is a historian of science and technology, and is a lecturer at the University of Virgina

MATTHEW N. EISLER is a historian of science and technology, and is a lecturer at the University of Virgina. Series: Studies in Modern Science, Technology, a. Hardcover: 274 pages. Start reading Overpotential on your Kindle in under a minute. Don't have a Kindle? Get your Kindle here, or download a FREE Kindle Reading App.

Series: Studies in Modern Science, Technology, and the Environment . Only in the early 1990s did a model-the PC-25, a phosphoric acid fuel cell (PAFC)-appear on the market.

Books Book details, Overpotential: Fuel Cells, Futurism, and the. For a time in the late 1990s and early 2000s, it was nearly impossible to read popular literature on science and technology without.

Home Browse Books Book details, Overpotential: Fuel Cells, Futurism, and the. Overpotential: Fuel Cells, Futurism, and the Making of a Power Panacea. By Matthew N. Eisler. No cover image For a time in the late 1990s and early 2000s, it was nearly impossible to read popular literature on science and technology without encountering praise for the fuel cell. Lauded by engineers, scientists, and policymakers, the device, which converts chemical energy into electrical energy, was then a virtual byword for sustainable power.

Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read.

Just combine oxygen and hydrogen in an electrochemical. Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read. Start by marking Overpotential: Fuel Cells, Futurism, and the Making of a Power Panacea (Studies in Modern Science, Technology, and the Environment) as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read.

Environmental Science. Publications citing this paper.

SERIES: A Studies in Modern Science, Technology. Rutgers University Press. Just combine oxygen and hydrogen in an electrochemical reaction that produces water and electricity, and you’ll have a clean, efficient power source. But scientists have spent decades-and billions of dollars in government and industry funding-developing the fuel cell.

Overpotential: Fuel Cells, Futurism, and the Making of a Power Panacea (Studies in Modern Science, Technology, and the Environment) by Matthew N.

Overpotential charts the twists and turns in the ongoing quest to create the perfect fuel cell. By exploring the gap between the theory and practice of fuel cell power, Matthew N. Eisler opens a window into broader issues in the history of science, technology, and society after the Second World War, including the sociology of laboratory life, the relationship between academe, industry, and government in developing advanced technologies, the role of technology in environmental and pollution politics, and the. rise of utopian discourse in science and engineering.

Richard Hirsh, "Matthew N. Introduction: The Humanities and the Sciences. " Isis 104, no. 2 (June 2013): 415-416. Of all published articles, the following were the most read within the past 12 months. The History of Medicine and the Scientific Revolution. Translating History of Science Books into Chinese: Why? Which Ones? How? Zhang. Science and Orthodox Christianity: An Overview. Nicolaidis et al. Ten Problems in History and Philosophy of Science.

It sounds so simple. Just combine oxygen and hydrogen in an electrochemical reaction that produces water and electricity, and you’ll have a clean, efficient power source. But scientists have spent decades—and billions of dollars in government and industry funding—developing the fuel cell. There have been successes and serendipitous discoveries along the way, but engineering a fuel cell that is both durable and affordable has proved extraordinarily difficult.

Overpotential charts the twists and turns in the ongoing quest to create the perfect fuel cell. By exploring the gap between the theory and practice of fuel cell power, Matthew N. Eisler opens a window into broader issues in the history of science, technology, and society after the Second World War, including the sociology of laboratory life, the relationship between academe, industry, and government in developing advanced technologies, the role of technology in environmental and pollution politics, and the rise of utopian discourse in science and engineering.