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eBook Biomedical Technology and Human Rights (UNESCO S.) ePub

eBook Biomedical Technology and Human Rights (UNESCO S.) ePub

by Eugene B. Brody

  • ISBN: 1855213737
  • Category: Engineering
  • Subcategory: Engineering
  • Author: Eugene B. Brody
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Dartmouth Pub Co; First Edition edition (August 1, 1993)
  • Pages: 320
  • ePub book: 1281 kb
  • Fb2 book: 1649 kb
  • Other: mbr lrf docx rtf
  • Rating: 4.9
  • Votes: 991

Description

Start by marking Biomedical Technology and Human Rights as Want to Read .

Start by marking Biomedical Technology and Human Rights as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read. This book presents a humane approach to the issue of health rights, recognizing that they are imbedded in an interpersonal web of privileges and obligations understandable in particular socio-economic and cultural contexts. As such it reflects the author's long experience as a clinician, a scholar and an international health consultant.

on the issue of the human genome and human rights, building upon the considerable work done on this topic by the IBC in. .

Used: Very Good Details. Sold by Better World Books: West. Condition: Used: Very Good.

Human cloning is the creation of a genetically identical copy (or clone) of a human. The term is generally used to refer to artificial human cloning, which is the reproduction of human cells and tissue. It does not refer to the natural conception and delivery of identical twins. The possibility of human cloning has raised controversies. These ethical concerns have prompted several nations to pass laws regarding human cloning and its legality.

Commission on Human Rights and, at the European level, the . b. The UNESCO Universal Declaration on Bioethics and Human Rights. complex challenges for human rights that emerge from biomedical developments.

Commission on Human Rights and, at the European level, the Council of Europe. But. also non-governmental organizations are following this same strategy and make insistent. reference to human rights in their statements and guidelines as a way to reinforce their. The traditional human rights instruments are clearly insufficient to cope with the. means that specific common rules are urgently needed in this area.

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Download books for free. Concise yet comprehensive, this handbook illuminates the equipment, devices, and techniques used in modern medicine to diagnose, treat, and monitor human illnesses.

2(2003) ; Eugene B. Brody, Biomedical Technology and Human Rights, Unesco Publishing, Paris, 1993, See for examples: The Universal Declaration on the Human Genome and Human Rights (1997) by the.

Kurt Bayertz (e., Sanctity of Life and Human Dignity, Kluwer Academic Publisher, Dordrecht, 1996, 91 92; Patrick Verspieren, La Dignità nei Dibattiti Politici e Bioetica in Concilium Rivista Internazionale di Teologia, 2(2003) ; Eugene B. UN; The Council of Europe Additional Protocol to the Convention for the Protection of Human Rights and Dignity of the Human Being with Regard to the Application of Biology and Medicine.

‘The struggle for human rights is like an overflowing river that floods down across the valley making the fields ever . This paper argues for the human rights strategy that characterizes the emerging international biomedical law.

‘The struggle for human rights is like an overflowing river that floods down across the valley making the fields ever more fertile’’ (1). With this simile, an Italian academic illustrates the expanding force of the human rights movement, which tends to cover all new areas in which the dignity and freedom of the human person is in need of protection. Probably the most recent field that needs to be ‘‘fertilized’’ by the principles of human rights is medicine, especially genetics.

This book presents a humane approach to the issue of health rights, recognizing that they are imbedded in an interpersonal web of privileges and obligations understandable in particular socio-economic and cultural contexts. As such it reflects the author's long experience as a clinician, a scholar and an international health consultant. It is aimed not only at policy makers and those concerned with human rights and biomedical ethics in general, but at scientists, practitioners and students of medicine, public health officers and the other health professionals, especially those whose interests cross national and cultural boundaries.