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eBook Nuclear Development Risks and Benefits of Nuclear Energy ePub

eBook Nuclear Development Risks and Benefits of Nuclear Energy ePub

by OECD Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development

  • ISBN: 9264035516
  • Category: Engineering
  • Subcategory: Engineering
  • Author: OECD Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: oecd publishing (June 21, 2007)
  • Pages: 84
  • ePub book: 1792 kb
  • Fb2 book: 1690 kb
  • Other: lrf txt azw lrf
  • Rating: 4.8
  • Votes: 908

Description

The Nuclear Energy Agency. The Nuclear Energy Agency (NEA) is an intergovernmental agency that facilitates co-operation among countries with advanced nuclear technology infrastructures to seek excellence in nuclear safety, technology, science, environment and law. The NEA, which is under the framework of the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development, is headquartered in Paris, France.

Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD). Nuclear energy can play an important role in the energy mix for the 21st century. Intergovernmental organisations such as the OECD are providing a framework for effective international co-operation. Today I would like to state clearly the commitment of the OECD Nuclear Energy Agency to continue supporting collective action for safe, emissions-free, low-cost nuclear power.

Nuclear Energy Agency.

Who we are. The Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) is an international organisation that works to build better policies for better lives. Our goal is to shape policies that foster prosperity, equality, opportunity and well-being for all. We draw on almost 60 years of experience and insights to better prepare the world of tomorrow. Together with governments, policy makers and citizens, we work on establishing international norms and finding evidence-based solutions to a range of social, economic and environmental challenges.

The Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD; French: Organisation de coopération et de développement économiques, OCDE) is an intergovernmental economic organisation with 36 member countries, founded in 1961 to stimulate economic progress and world trade.

NUCLEAR ENERGY AGENCY The OECD Nuclear Energy Agency (NEA) was established on 1st February 1958 under . energy policy and to broader OECD policy analyses in areas such as energy and sustainable development.

NUCLEAR ENERGY AGENCY The OECD Nuclear Energy Agency (NEA) was established on 1st February 1958 under the name of the OEEC European Nuclear Energy Agency. It received its present designation on 20th April 1972, when Japan became its first non-european full Member. Specific areas of competence of the NEA include safety and regulation of nuclear activities, radioactive waste management, radiological protection, nuclear science, economic and technical analyses of the nuclear fuel cycle, nuclear law and liability, and public information.

The development of nuclear science and technology has led to increasing nuclear waste .

The development of nuclear science and technology has led to increasing nuclear waste containing uranium being released and disposed in the environment. the benefits and results; a better understanding of the range of uses and situations for which each is most appropriate.

Start by marking Nuclear Energy Programmes In Oecd/Nea Countries as Want to Read .

Alternative Title: OECD. A further major goal is the coordination of economic aid to developing countries. Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development, international organization founded in 1961 to stimulate economic progress and world trade. Lacking the power to enforce its decisions, the OECD is essentially a consultative assembly that pursues its program through moral suasion, conferences, seminars, and numerous publications. Although the rule of unanimity inhibits its impact on member countries, the OECD is considered to have a significant influence as an advisory body.

Moreover, the introduction of advanced reactors and fuel cycles could multiply the lifetime of those resources by 30 or more and allow for a sharp rise in demand. Indeed, breeder reactors could eventually make nuclear energy a quasi-renewable source. There are economic arguments too. The competitiveness of existing nuclear power plants has been proven.

In the context of sustainable development policies, decision making in the energy sector should be based on carefully designed trade-offs which take into account, insofar as feasible, all of the alternative options' advantages and drawbacks from the economic, environmental and social viewpoints. This report examines various aspects of nuclear and other energy chains for generating electricity, and provides illustrative examples of quantitative and qualitative indicators for those chains with regard to economic competitiveness, environmental burdens (such as air emissions and solid waste streams) and social aspects (including employment and health impacts). It offers authoritative data and references to published literature on energy chain analysis which can be used in support of decision making.