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eBook Arduino Projects to Save the World ePub

eBook Arduino Projects to Save the World ePub

by Emery Premeaux

  • ISBN: 143023623X
  • Category: Engineering
  • Subcategory: Engineering
  • Author: Emery Premeaux
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Apress; 1st ed. edition (December 13, 2011)
  • Pages: 256
  • ePub book: 1430 kb
  • Fb2 book: 1309 kb
  • Other: lrf docx txt mbr
  • Rating: 4.5
  • Votes: 702

Description

FREE shipping on qualifying offers The book concludes with the project of building a energy monitor derived from basic principals of current and voltage sensing and deriving real and reactive power, power factor.

FREE shipping on qualifying offers. Arduino Projects to Save the World shows that it takes little more than a few tools, a few wires and sensors. The book concludes with the project of building a energy monitor derived from basic principals of current and voltage sensing and deriving real and reactive power, power factor and displaying them on an LCD. You can then use your meter to identify the power hogs in your home and plot data saved onto an SD card using a spreadsheet.

This repository accompanies Arduino Projects to Save the World by Emery Premeaux and Brian Evans (Apress, 2011). Download the files as a zip using the green button, or clone the repository to your machine using Git. Releases. Release v. corresponds to the code in the published book, without corrections or updates.

Saving the world, one Arduino at a time. Please note: the print version of this title is black & white; the eBook is full color. Monitor local seismic activity with your own seismic monitor. Keep your Arduino devices alive in the field with a solar powered device that uses a smart, power-saving design. Monitor your data and devices with a wireless radio device; place your sensors where you like without worrying about wires.

Building Arduino Projects for the Internet of Things. PDF Drive investigated dozens of problems and listed the biggest global issues facing the world today. Arduino projects to save the world. 64 MB·2,095 Downloads. is constructing Arduino projects that focus on sciences. Let's Change The World Together. Pdfdrive:hope Give books away.

Start by marking Arduino Projects to Save the World as Want to Read .

Start by marking Arduino Projects to Save the World as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read.

Author: Emery Premeaux Brian Evans. 30 Arduino Projects for the Evil Genius. Ecotourists Save the World.

Автор: Premeaux Emery Название: Arduino Projects to Save the World Издательство: Springer . Finally, Arduino Internals integrates different skills and design techniques by presenting several projects thatchallenge you to put ills to the test.

Finally, Arduino Internals integrates different skills and design techniques by presenting several projects thatchallenge you to put ills to the test.

Finding books BookSee BookSee - Download books for free. Emery Premeaux, Brian Evans.

Author: Emery Premeaux & Brian Evans Publisher: Apress Pages: 238 ISBN: 978-1430236238 Aimed at: Hardware . All you have to do to save the world is create sensor packages that are cheap enough and robust enough to be used everywhere.

This book's message - all you have to do to save the world is create sensor packages that are cheap enough and robust enough to be used everywhere. Of course, knowing what is going on isn't quite enough to save the world. After measurement has to come action but it is a good first step.

Arduino Projects to Save the World shows that it takes little more than a few tools, a few wires and sensors, an Arduino board, and a bit of gumption to build devices that lower energy bills, help you grow our own food, monitor pollution in the air and in the ground, even warn you about earth tremors.

Arduino Projects to Save the World introduces the types of sensors needed to collect environmental data―from temperature sensors to motion sensors. You'll see projects that deal with energy sources―from building your own power strip to running your Arduino board on solar panels so you can actually proceed to build systems that help, for example, to lower your energy bills. Once you have some data, it's time to put it to good use by publishing it online as you collect it; this book shows you how.

The core of this book deals with the Arduino projects themselves:

Account for heat loss using a heat loss temperature sensor array that sends probes into every corner of your house for maximum measurement.  Monitor local seismic activity with your own seismic monitor. Keep your Arduino devices alive in the field with a solar powered device that uses a smart, power-saving design. Monitor your data and devices with a wireless radio device; place your sensors where you like without worrying about wires. Keep an eye on your power consumption with a sophisticated power monitor that records its data wherever you like.

Arduino Projects to Save the World teaches the aspiring green systems expert to build environmentally-sound, home-based Arduino devices. Saving the world, one Arduino at a time.

Please note: the print version of this title is black & white; the eBook is full color.

Comments

Kage Kage
Very good book had the exact sketch I was looking for to set up several temperature sensors. Shows steps to build sketch and then at end of chapter gives the complete sketch.
Bukelv Bukelv
I may not save the world, but his book helps us accomplish our more modest goals.
His writing style keeps it fun and useful.
Raniconne Raniconne
The first author describes his experience in a Japanese Hackerspace after this past year's fatal earthquakes and nuclear disaster, and how a dedicated team of Arduino DIYers built a portable remote reporting and GPS locating Geiger Counter that produced reliable radiation maps while central authorities relied on much more primitive data. He then extends this theme of capturing, displaying, reporting (remotely) and displaying environmental data in several spheres: temperature sensing, seismographic (earthquake) measurements, and power usage monitors.

The theme of building powerful and useful measurement and logging instruments has many uses and is
applicable beyond the environment (for example I am applying many of these principles to health and physiology information). This book is invaluable in that it provides information on how to connect any analog sensor to the Arduino, calibrate measurements, display data on a LCD, or Oscilloscope-like display, power the instrument by solar or battery power for in-the field use, transmit data wirelessly, upload data reports to an Internet of Things-like service, creating power-saving modes for the portable Arduino-based instrument and log data in files on a SD-card.

Building sensing and measurement instruments is one of the most valuable projects on can do with the Arduino (or any Microcontroller), more so if they are portable, can report wirelessly, share data over the Internet or with PC-based programs. This workbook, shows clearly and explicitly how to create your own portable and self-reporting test and measurement instruments for environmental (or any other scientific or industrial purpose). This is clearly the next step for any Arduino enthusiast who has moved beyond the stage of blinking LEDS and activating a buzzer.

This is an exquisite and valuable book for any Hacker or Microcomputer enthusiast.

--Ira Laefsky, MSE/MBA
Information Technology Consultant and Human Computer Interaction Researcher
retired from the Senior Consulting Staff of Arthur D. Little, Inc. & Digital Equipment Corporation
Perilanim Perilanim
I was immediately impressed with this book when I saw the priority given to sensing the environment in chapter 1. After all, if you are going to save the world, first you have to know what is wrong with it, and then you need to know if your efforts to save it are working!

I gave this book four stars because it does such a great job of aiding your understand the whys of how to power and interface Arduinos, but it could have been longer for the price. It may not be suitable for a beginner unless they've had a reasonably good grounding in mathematics and physics and are comfortable reading electronic schematics, using a soldering iron and assembling hardware into customised boxes. One of the advantages in the book's catering to a more experienced audience, is that a fair degree of freedom is provided in what Arduino derivative you use and how you power and assemble the projects covered in the book. The latter chapters typically end with a page or so of links to relevant resources.

The source code can be downloaded from the publisher's site, but unfortunately, as is commonly the case with Arduino books, the IDE version used to compile the included code is not stated. You may need to download an older IDE version prior to the current stable V1.0 and V1.5 releases to get the code to compile, particularly where there's a dependency on third party libraries.

This book will certainly reward time invested in reading and understanding the contents and prove a useful reference as you build your own projects.

The book commences with an explanation of the operation of the Arduino Analogue to Digital converter and how to understand analogue sensors, so you can correctly interface and read from them. The end of the chapter includes instructions on how to build a great prototyping shield by assembling a solderless breadboard onto a shield template.

In Chapter 2, some useful techniques for developing Arduino projects are covered, namely developing a routine to measure temperature and modifying the routine into a module that can be easily put to use handling multiple temperature sensors with different characteristics.

There is a very informative and interesting section in chapter 3 on the various options for powering remote Arduino circuits, with plenty of good advice on how to eke the most life out of battery powered projects, including information on the characteristics of different battery types and various means of capturing energy from the environment. Also included is useful information on the relative strengths and weaknesses of different Arduino variants when used remotely. The chapter concludes with an example of how to include a clock module and modify a library for the RTC8564 Real Time Clock IC in order to interrupt an Arduino from a sleep mode so sensor readings can be collected and communicated via the serial port.

A pretty comprehensive chapter 4 explores different options for wireless communication between Arduino nodes, providing examples using Chibi and Xbee solutions. On the coding front, organising your code into functions and how to use and modify libraries are covered. We are also introduced to Processing which is used to process and log the received data from your remote Arduino via a PC serial port, so it can be loaded into a spreadsheet for analysis.

Chapter 5 looks at how to contribute to the Internet of Things, i.e. how to submit your data to Online Services. It includes a simple worked example of using Processing on the PC to provide a bridge between your remote Arduino and an online service, in this case Pachube (now Xively [...]

Lessons from the Japan 2011 Earthquake prompted a very interesting sixth chapter on building, testing and remotely deploying a buried 3 axis seismic sensor, monitored by an Arduino Pro Mini that uses a MAX232 driven RS232 serial link. It contains some good tips on how to code for a high throughput sensing and data logging application.

The book concludes with the project of building a energy monitor derived from basic principals of current and voltage sensing and deriving real and reactive power, power factor and displaying them on an LCD. You can then use your meter to identify the power hogs in your home and plot data saved onto an SD card using a spreadsheet. I was impressed by the effective way this project was designed, but less so on the use of a few 'magic numbers' in the code, one of which wasn't necessary and just slowed down the Arduino (i.e. multiplying by 0.996 when the monitor calibration won't be anywhere near as accurate as +/- 0.4%).

Index coverage is a somewhat disappointing well spaced out 8 pages, but I suspect many readers will end up using plenty of post-it notes in this excellent book.