cdc-coteauxdegaronne
» » The Pirate Wars
eBook The Pirate Wars ePub

eBook The Pirate Wars ePub

by Peter Earle

  • ISBN: 0312335792
  • Category: Transportation
  • Subcategory: Engineering
  • Author: Peter Earle
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Thomas Dunne Books; 1ST edition (April 1, 2005)
  • Pages: 320
  • ePub book: 1159 kb
  • Fb2 book: 1372 kb
  • Other: docx rtf txt doc
  • Rating: 4.3
  • Votes: 706

Description

The Pirate Wars takes the romantic fable of oceangoing Robin Hoods sailing under the banner of King Death and contrasts it with the murderous reality of robbery.

The Pirate Wars takes the romantic fable of oceangoing Robin Hoods sailing under the banner of King Death and contrasts it with the murderous reality of robbery.

Investigating the fascination pirates hold over the popular imagination, Peter Earle takes the fable of ocean-going .

Investigating the fascination pirates hold over the popular imagination, Peter Earle takes the fable of ocean-going Robin Hoods sailing under the "banner of King Death" and contrasts it with the murderous reality of robbery, torture and death and the freedom of a short, violent life on the high seas. The book charts 250 years of piracy, from Cornwall to the Caribbean, from the 16th century to the hanging of the last pirate captain in Boston in 1835.

The Pirate Wars book. Noted maritime historian Peter Earle charts centuries of piracy, from Cornwall to the Caribbean, from the sixteenth century to the hanging of the last pirate captain in Boston in 1835

The Pirate Wars book. The Pirate Wars takes the romantic fable of oceangoing Robin Hoods. Noted maritime historian Peter Earle charts centuries of piracy, from Cornwall to the Caribbean, from the sixteenth century to the hanging of the last pirate captain in Boston in 1835. Along the way, we meet characters like Edward Teach, the notorious "Blackbeard," the treasure-hungry Captain Kidd, the dreaded corsairs of Barbary, and the defiant buccaneers of the West Indies.

The Pirate Wars - Peter Earle. These pirate wars are the principle subject of this book and the aim is to examine both sides in this long conflict. Some chapters focus on the pirates and uncover their changing nature as they gradually acquired the attributes, customs and lifestyle which we associate with the word pirate today. Others examine the changes in government attitudes and policy towards pirates and look in detail at the many anti-piracy campaigns conducted with varying success by navies, campaigns whose unsung heroes are not remembered today while the pirates themselves have entered into fable.

While Earle is clear at the outset that his own sympathies are fairly firmly with the navies (and the English Navy most of all) he manages to spin enough yarns of derring-do to excite the pirate lover as well. An added bonus was Earle's fairly extensive treatment of the oft-ignored pirates of the Barbary Coast. I'd read a great deal about the Carribbean rogues, but some of the Barbary variety made them seem like docile bunnies.

Investigating the fascination pirates hold over the popular imagination, Peter Earle takes the fable of ocean-going Robin Hoods sailing under the "banner of King Death" and contrasts . Books related to The Pirate Wars.

Praise for The Pirate Wars. Wonderfully detailed. Peter Earle formerly taught at the London School of Economics and is now Emeritus Reader in Economic History at the University of London. San Antonio Express-News. He is the author of over a dozen books on English social and maritime history, including two on different aspects of piracy, Corsairs of Malta and Barbary and The Sack of Panama.

In his masterful book, Peter Earle offers a much-needed reappraisal of this distorted view. He contends that pirates were rarely men of honour; rather, they were desperadoes and criminals whose grotesque adventures wrought untold misery. Many were outlaws from society; some were monsters who indulged in gratuitous torture. Earle also argues that the stereotypical portrait of the macho, white-skinned buccaneer will no longer suffice

item 5 Pirate Wars by Earle, Peter -Pirate Wars by Earle, Peter. Additional Product Features. Place of Publication.

item 5 Pirate Wars by Earle, Peter -Pirate Wars by Earle, Peter. item 6 The Pirate Wars: Pirates vs. the Legitimate Navies. by Earle, Peter Paperback -The Pirate Wars: Pirates vs. by Earle, Peter Paperback. item 7 Pirate Wars by Earle, Peter -Pirate Wars by Earle, Peter.

Investigating the fascination pirates hold over the popular imagination, Peter Earle takes the fable of ocean-going Robin Hoods sailing under the "banner of King Death" and contrasts it with the murderous reality of robbery, torture and death and the freedom of a short, violent life on the high seas. The book charts 250 years of piracy, from Cornwall to the Caribbean, from the 16th century to the hanging of the last pirate captain in Boston in 1835. Along the way, we meet characters like Captain Thomas Cocklyn, chosen as commander of his ship "on account of his brutality and ignorance," and Edward Teach, the notorious "Blackbeard," who felt of his crew "that if he did not now and then kill one of them they would forget who he was." Using material from British Admiralty records, this is an account of the Golden Age of pirates and of the men of the legitimate navies of the world charged with the task of finally bringing these cutthroats to justice.

Comments

Eng.Men Eng.Men
I enjoyed the information in this book, but I found it to be a dry read most of the time.

Earle does a good job covering the rise and reasons behind the three major eras of piracy in the Mediterannian and Altlantic seas. But the new part of this history for me was the account of European and, later, American responses to piracy. Generally, the pirates get all the treatment in histories, and Earle provides a look at their unsung opponents and the troubles and victories they had.

While there are some issues with some of the history (like continuing the myths about poor Capt. Kidd), the main issue I had was that very little excitement came at me off the page. It read like a standard history book, so while I was very interested in the material itself, the writing could have used a bit more "oomph".

Still, the material, and its perspective on the pirate hunters, certainly makes this a must read for any fan of this part of history.
you secret you secret
Excellent book on the Pirates "Golden Era" overall with a lot of details as well.
LØV€ YØỮ LØV€ YØỮ
I found the book informative.. every author has the same facts at hand and some make them more interesting than others. The book goes into my collection as a good reference source.
terostr terostr
This bbok gives the true history of the actual events. A must for researchers and pirate buffs.
Huston Huston
I found this historical non-fiction book, much as one might happen upon a piece of buried treasure, lost on a communal bookshelf in the breakroom of a job I once had. Who doesn’t like pirate stories, I asked myself, opening the book to pass the time while eating a sandwich. I was pleasantly surprised at what I’d discovered.

Comparing and contrasting the epic myths of pirate lore against the real circumstances of the world they lived and sailed in, Earle does a great job of carrying the reader along. You’ll learn the political, economical, and geographical elements that defined the rise and fall of the pirate era. But unlike a dry historical account, Earle paints deep portraits of numerous known and little known pirates, and weaves the fable in with the fact.

It’s a wonderful time travel book, with descriptions of locales and life at the time vivid enough for your imagination to carry you there. And in the end, having learned some of the hard truths of a pirate’s life does little to dull one’s infatuation with them.

I’d recommend this book to anyone seeking an adventure, who’s not afraid to learn some interesting history along the way.

Robert E. Birnschein - Beachabond Books
http://www.amazon.com/Mr.-Robert-E.-Birnschein/e/B00K3ZOZG2/ref=sr_ntt_srch_lnk_1?qid=1425696265&sr=8-1
Rayli Rayli
I have read and reviewed a number of books on pirates and piracy and find this one to be among the jewels of the bunch. It is readable, informative and even, at times, entertaining.

The author's premise for the book is that much of western civilization had been waging a war with pirates for hundreds of years, culminating in the eventual decline and virtual elimination of these renegades from western seas in the early to mid 19th century. Peter Earle takes us through the history of pirates in those seas, from the origins to the eventual demise. Along the way he spreads a web of tales and stories, supported by research that should entertain many a reader that would otherwise find history a dry meal. The author's recounting of the history is reasonably linear beginning in the 16th century and progressing steadily forward in time frame.

By necessity, it seems, much of the author's work centers on English and related history, although he does step off the standard fair of Golden Age pirates often enough that even a knowledgeable reader will find something new in the way of pirate fact. There is little or no illustration; my one complaint, surely a few maps were warranted in the least. The bibliography, however, is a thing of delight, to be mused over in the constant search for new sources.

My bottom line is that while I have a few books that are nearer my heart, there are not many that I have found as encompassing or informative as this one. I recommend Pirates in the Caribbean :1493-1720 by Cruz Apestegui as an excellent source for the Spanish side of the Golden Age of Piracy, and Angus Konstam's History of Pirates for a glossy overview of piracy. P-)
Moonworm Moonworm
Although piracy has been in existence for millennia and in many parts of the world, the author mainly concentrates on piracy in the Atlantic, the Caribbean and the Mediterranean over a period of about 230 years, culminating in the 1830s. Rather than presenting various mini-biographies of famous pirates, or dwelling on the finer details of pirate life, the author has chosen to present a more sweeping picture of piracy, i.e., the big picture. Different types of pirates are discussed, as are the reasons for the ups and downs in pirate activity over the years and the many efforts to eradicate them. The book is clearly written and, although quite authoritative and heavily referenced, it is also quite exciting. The only unfortunate downside to this book is its complete lack of maps and figures. A few of each would have been very useful to complement the text, e.g., illustrations of the different types of ships and the geographical areas in which various pirates operated. Despite this minor drawback, this is an excellent book that should appeal to both history buffs and pirate lovers alike.