cdc-coteauxdegaronne
» » The Subterranean Railway: How the London Underground was Built and How it Changed the City Forever
eBook The Subterranean Railway: How the London Underground was Built and How it Changed the City Forever ePub

eBook The Subterranean Railway: How the London Underground was Built and How it Changed the City Forever ePub

by Christian Wolmar

  • ISBN: 0857890697
  • Category: Transportation
  • Subcategory: Engineering
  • Author: Christian Wolmar
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Atlantic Books; Main edition (November 1, 2012)
  • Pages: 384
  • ePub book: 1358 kb
  • Fb2 book: 1270 kb
  • Other: doc lrf lit docx
  • Rating: 4.5
  • Votes: 315

Description

Wolmar has a great passion for the London Underground and shows it on every page, uncovering the characters who shaped the transport system which is London's lifeblood.

Wolmar has a great passion for the London Underground and shows it on every page, uncovering the characters who shaped the transport system which is London's lifeblood. The book covers in detail from the 1860s up until the end of the Second World War, if you want a post-war history, look elsewhere! This book is fabulous.

Tom Fort, Sunday Telegraph; 'The Subterranean Railway captures the enthusiasm of the early years. using a deft selection of facts and anecdotes. John O'Connell, Time Out". I really enjoyed it. Wolmar has a great passion for the London Underground and shows it on every page, uncovering the characters who shaped the transport system which is London's lifeblood.

The subterranean railway.

Read unlimited books and audiobooks on the web, iPad, iPhone and Android. The subterranean railway. Christian Wolmar is a writer and broadcaster. His previous books include Broken Rails: How Privatisation Wrecked Britain’s Railways and Down the Tube: The Battle For London’s Underground. He writes regularly for the Independent and the Evening Standard, and frequently appears on TV and radio on current affairs and news programmes. He is currently working on a new history of the railways in Britain.

The Subterranean Railway book. Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read. Start by marking The Subterranean Railway: How the London Underground Was Built and How It Changed the City Forever as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read.

Since the Victorian era, London's Underground has had played a vital role in the daily life of generations of Londoners. Christian Wolmar celebrates the vision and determination of the 19th-century pioneers who made the world's first, and still the largest, underground passenger railway: one of the most impressive engineering achievements in history

Christian Wolmar is a writer and broadcaster, principally on transport matters. A very thorough and in-depth of the long history of the London UndergrounD.

Christian Wolmar is a writer and broadcaster, principally on transport matters.

Christian Wolmar explains how th. The changes this brought about affected every aspect of life in the second half of the 19th century. Christian Wolmar explains how the London Underground was built at a time when no one had built a railway under a city before. On an economic level, industries grew into much larger enterprises. On a social and cultural level, people were now able to travel long distances for vacation. The railways ruled the world for about a century until they were displaced by the motor car and, later, the airplane.

The Subterranean Railway: How the London Underground Was Built and How It Changed the City Forever (2004), ISBN 1-84354-022-3. On the Wrong Line: How Ideology and Incompetence Wrecked Britain's Railways (rev. ed. 2005), ISBN 1-854198-7 (previously published as Broken Rails). Fire And Steam: A New History of the Railways in Britain (2007), ISBN 10-0753156849. Charles Pearson - For other people named Charles Pearson, see Charles Pearson (disambiguation).

This says 30,000, and references The Subterranean Railway: How the London Underground Was Built and . Can anyone give a better source or more accurate figure? Does anyone have Wolmar's book to hand, to verify the cite? - - The Anome (talk) 16:30, 6 January 2008 (UTC).

This says 30,000, and references The Subterranean Railway: How the London Underground Was Built and How It Changed the City For Ever by Christian Wolmar. ISBN 1843540223, or. ISBN 1843540231 ?); if that's, as I suspect, the actual source for the figure, this might be the best source, and might even cite a primary source. Wolmar's book states 30,000 for the first day (Chapter 3, page 41) although he does not give a source.

Since the Victorian era, London's Underground has had played a vital role in the daily life of generations of Londoners. Christian Wolmar celebrates the vision and determination of the 19th-century pioneers who made the world's first, and still the largest, underground passenger railway: one of the most impressive engineering achievements in history. From the early days of steam to electrification, via the Underground's contribution to 20th-century industrial design and its role during two world wars, the story comes right up to the present with its sleek, driverless trains, and the wrangles over the future of the system. This book reveals London's hidden wonder in all its glory, and shows how the railway beneath the streets helped create the city we know today.

Comments

Trash Trash
If you like this sort of stuff, read this.
I love the Underground and this was a "must read" for me.
I appreciate not everyone like this sort of stuff - not a thriller but a well-constructed history with lovely anecdotes.
Brazil Brazil
I bought it for a friend who is taking his family to London for the first time and he really liked it!
Akinozuru Akinozuru
Yet another book By Christian Wolmar on the history of British railways, this time on the evolution of the 'Underground'.
It is another well researched and authoritative guide on British Rail transport. He leaves no stone unturned in his research of engineering and politics in the planning and development of what is today the first and one of the most complex underground rail systems in the world.
Mr_Mole Mr_Mole
Very detailed history of the Tube.
Ustamya Ustamya
Who said you cant build a railway under a Victorian London?
English industrial revolution at its finest
Unknown technology, learn as you go, and innovation. The greatest challenge in London's history.
The British equivalent to the Transpacific railway in the States. Not as long granted but with an equivalent effect on the society of London and England as a whole.
How they did it and what it took to get here stands for all time.
Its worth the train fare for this one.
Mamuro Mamuro
This is a hard to find book in bookstores - even in London. So it was great to find it online and get it painlessly!
Granijurus Granijurus
I purchased this for my grandson, at his request, and he was thrilled with the book. He has enjoyed it and was very happy to have received it. I was pleased with the purchase.
Popular railway writer/journalist Christian Wolmar is known for his readable and intelligent books on the British railways and their history. In "The Subterranean Railway", he has applied his skills to writing a history of the London Underground, its construction, development, companies and politics. In the best traditions of popular history the book covers all the aspects of the tube's history, from the first suggestions for underground rail to the modern extensions. It covers the technical aspects of constructing the tunnels, the fares policies through the century, the sequence of the lines' development and their oddities, the competition between the individual underground railway lines in the early stages, the politics of public transport, and the individual Victorian and Edwardian entrepreneurs who determined much of the Underground's current structure and functioning. Wolmar even pays attention to the design aspects of the tube stations and Harry Beck's famous map, to the development of 'Metroland' around the Metropolitan Line in the northwest of London, and to the central role played by London Transport's recruitment in the Caribbean for drawing West Indian workers to London in the first mass immigration of that kind to Britain.

The book is well-written, balanced, informative and accessible. It does help to have a basic knowledge of London and the geographical layout already, given the proliferation of names and places in the book, although the modern tube map is helpfully provided with the illustrations. Wolmar's book shows some interesting aspects of the railways' development, in particular the decisive role played by the fact that until relatively quite late the different Underground lines were run by individual companies aiming to make a profit and competing with each other, rather than a planned urban public transport service as in most other cities with major underground railways. This role, as Wolmar has also showed for the mainline railways in Britain in his celebrated book on the topic (Fire and Steam: How the Railways Transformed Britain), has mainly been negative. Although the activities of the underground railways allowed the construction of major projects for public transport at a time when it would have been politically impossible for the state to do so, it led to a great number of inefficiencies as competing stations and whole lines were built close to each other, as tickets valid for one company were not accepted on the other (gravely limiting the usefulness of the entire system), as companies failed to expand useful lines for years on end for want of capital, and so forth. It is no coincidence that until the 1990s, every single developed country had amalgamated its mainline and underground railway lines each into a single public company, as competition in this branch is simply not productive from a public point of view - if anything, public transport by rail in countries where space is significantly limited is a rare obvious example of a natural monopoly, just like healthcare.

Also interesting is Wolmar's emphasis on the importance the American investors such as Yerkes played in consolidating the underground lines into a more coherent system akin to what we know now, as well as the major significance of the structure of the bus system for the functioning of the Underground - the bus lines for the longest times were the main competitor and tended to 'poach' the customers rather than providing connecting services, as is the aim now. Add to this various interesting anecdotes about the oddities of the tube - such as the bizarre side line to Mill Hill East on the Northern line or the two directly proximate stations in New Cross - as well as small histories of individual stations interspersed in the main narrative and Wolmar's clear passion for the Underground, and you have a readable and impressive book. Wolmar wants us to realize how amazing it is the Underground exists at all and functions as well as it does, and he succeeds in this purpose. A small note: since the book was written in 2004, it does not cover the Underground bombings of 2005, nor does it mention the newest expansions such as the East London expansion of the overground and the plans for Crossrail.