cdc-coteauxdegaronne
» » Unnecessary Talking: The Montesano Stories
eBook Unnecessary Talking: The Montesano Stories ePub

eBook Unnecessary Talking: The Montesano Stories ePub

by Mike O'Connor

  • ISBN: 1929355416
  • Category: Humor
  • Subcategory: Entertainment
  • Author: Mike O'Connor
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Pleasure Boat Studio; F First Edition edition (January 13, 2009)
  • Pages: 175
  • ePub book: 1736 kb
  • Fb2 book: 1664 kb
  • Other: azw lrf docx lit
  • Rating: 4.5
  • Votes: 894

Description

With UNNECESSARY TALKING, poet Mike O'Connor leads us through the streets and neighborhoods of Montesano, Washington-circa early 1950s. Books related to Unnecessary Talking: The Montesano Stories.

With UNNECESSARY TALKING, poet Mike O'Connor leads us through the streets and neighborhoods of Montesano, Washington-circa early 1950s. These stories and sketches make up a memoir of a young boy's clean, clear understanding of a world where mystery is common sense and adult rules are slippery as a wet bar of soap. O'Connor's writings, though rooted deeply in the rain-soaked soils of the Pacific Northwest, reach out to touch, in a tender and wise way, the very heart of an America lost but still loved"-Finn Wilcox.

Mike O'Connor, born in Aberdeen, Washington, is a poet, writer, and translator of Chinese literature. For 12 years, he farmed and worked in the woods before pursuing Chinese studies and a journalism career in Asia for fifteen years. He is the author of nine books of poetry, translation, and memoir. His most recent publications include IMMORTALITY (2010) and UNNECESSARY TALKING: THE MONTESANO STORIES (2009), both from Pleasure Boat Studio

Most recent three books: When the Tiger Weeps; Unnecessary Talking: The Montesano Stories; and Immortality. All from Pleasure Boat Studio, New York.

Most recent three books: When the Tiger Weeps; Unnecessary Talking: The Montesano Stories; and Immortality.

Unnecessary Talking book. Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read. Start by marking Unnecessary Talking: The Montesano Stories as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read. Literary Nonfiction  .

Unnecessary Talking : The Montesano Stories. In this warm and humorous memoir, the boy you meet is irrepressible, devilish, curious, rambunctious, imaginative, sports-minded, friendly, naive, and absolutely joyful-definitely the kind of boy who would get in trouble from his teacher for "unnecessary talking. Mike O'Connor's stories remind a reader of what it was like to grow up in small-town 1950's America. His most recent publications include IMMORTALITY (2010) and UNNECESSARY TALKING: THE MONTESANO STORIES (2009), both from Pleasure Boat Studio

Find nearly any book by Mike O'Connor. Get the best deal by comparing prices from over 100,000 booksellers.

Find nearly any book by Mike O'Connor. When the Tiger Weeps. ISBN 9781929355181 (978-1-929355-18-1) Softcover, Pleasure Boat Studio, 2004. Find signed collectible books: 'When the Tiger Weeps'. His most recent publications include IMMORTALITY (2010) and UNNECESSARY TALKING: THE MONTESANO STORIES (2009), both from Pleasure Boat Studio

Mike O'Connor is a staff writer at The Athletic Philadelphia, covering the NBA and the 76ers.

Mike O'Connor is a staff writer at The Athletic Philadelphia, covering the NBA and the 76ers. In the past, he has covered the Sixers for TheSixerSense. com and the NBA at large for bballbreakdown. Mike also works as an NBA scout for EV Hoops, a company that provides services for several NBA teams. The Markelle Fultz Debate: Gravity and the Kobe Assist.

It is a complete story unto itself, compiled from books four and five of the series, Brainchild and Smoke & Mirrors. If you’ve read those full-length novels, then you’ve already read most of the contents of this novella.

Literary Nonfiction. In this warm and humorous memoir, the boy you meet is irrepressible, devilish, curious, rambunctious, imaginative, sports-minded, friendly, naive, and absolutely joyful--definitely the kind of boy who would get in trouble from his teacher for "unnecessary talking." Mike O'Connor's stories remind a reader of what it was like to grow up in small-town 1950's America. "With UNNECESSARY TALKING, poet Mike O'Connor leads us through the streets and neighborhoods of Montesano, Washington--circa early 1950s. These stories and sketches make up a memoir of a young boy's clean, clear understanding of a world where mystery is common sense and adult rules are slippery as a wet bar of soap. O'Connor's writings, though rooted deeply in the rain-soaked soils of the Pacific Northwest, reach out to touch, in a tender and wise way, the very heart of an America lost but still loved"--Finn Wilcox.

Comments

Globus Globus
Mike O'Connor captures the spirit of Montesano, Washington pefectly in this charming read. I spent some time growing up there, too, and many of his memories are my memories - from swimming in Lake Sylvia to dining out at the Bee Hive (ohh.. those milkshakes!)...to digging clams at Westport...to the centerpiece of town, the courthouse and it's amazing clock and chime. (if it chimes 5:30 - it's time to get home to supper!). With each chapter, I was swept away to a simpler time, when playing outside and building stuff was what kids did after school; when a Green River was a beloved beverage (I miss Gene's Stop n' Go so much!); when everyone's dad hunted deer in the Fall and fished in the summer; and everyone, I do mean everyone, went to Bulldog football games. The towns of Satsop and Elma up the highway were always considered slightly suspect, Aberdeen was " all the way to town" and Seattle was a big, scary, exciting place the grownups would sometimes go for mysterious reasons, like doctor's appointments or Christmas shopping. His description of getting his tonsils out at St. Joe's Hospital in Aberdeen is exactly the same as mine, nurse nuns, promises of ice cream and all ( except I was served oatmeal instead of ice cream afterwards, and I'm still not over it.) The family names he mentions are still prominent in town, the very same people my family did business with, sat in church with, are buried next to in the Wynooche Cemetery. Thanks, Mike, for reminding me where I came from, and sparking some great memories.
Kupidon Kupidon
I recommend "Unnecessary Talking" for any reader looking for quality memoirs. The author, Mike O'Connor, poet and translator, visits the world of prose with great success. In the 28 short pieces contained in "Talking" he has allowed readers to go back with him to his early childhood in Montesano, Washington.
It was a world---the 1950's--so vastly different than today, it is remarkable to realize so much in American culture has changed in a half century. To me, it seems as different as a childhood spent in the late 18th century contrasted to one from the late 19th.
O'Connor's easy, free style has delivered this cultural contrast by establishing the innocent tone and perceptions of those years, mostly from around ten years of age. Too many writers of memoirs shoulder by these pre-hormone years to reach the conflict-rich clashes girls and boys endure during the onset of puberty, continuing through actual maturity.
Also, he does this without bemoaning the passing of one era by the intrusion of others--many others, in this reader's view. In the piece "The Metaphysical Courthouse" he employs style and language a less adventurous literary artist might not risk. Yet he does so, and establishes the piece---in my view---as "Talking's" most effective work, which is very effective indeed.
This is a book that has meaning beyond a single geographical area--or indeed, any time period. It is a clear demonstration of childhood's persistence of memory.
Syleazahad Syleazahad
Poet Mike O'Connor's boyhood home of Montesano, Washington comes alive through the imaginative, joyful, and mischievous eyes of his school-age persona, "Mike." "Unnecessary Talking" strikes a rich vein of funny and tender tales. Readers enter a boyish world of back-yard forts, bean-shooting wars, sandlot ball games, and complex interactions with the adults who run things.

These stories capture the innocence and optimism of the postwar years of the 1950s, when a small rural town could offer adventures, revelations, and alluring glimpses into the mysteries of the world to come. In one story Mike and his friends are excited by the news that television is coming to town. They gather at a friend's house at the appointed hour, tune in "The Lone Ranger" on the big cabinet radio, and sit riveted to the set. "We assumed, since we had never seen a television set, that the picture would appear where the glass for the tuner was." In another story, Mike and his friends are drawn away from pick-up football games on the courthouse field to talk to inmates through the barred windows of the jail. After a few colorful exchanges the boys ask why one prisoner is locked up, "For swearing?"

The simplicity of childlike reasoning is one of the delights of these stories. Mike, like all children, collects just enough information to begin to reason things out, then lets his imagination fly. In "Unnecessary Talking," a small town in southwest Washington is bathed in the glow of childhood -- and suspended in a world of wonder and discovery.
MisterMax MisterMax
Thanks to Michelle Bruns of Port Townsend for recommending this book. The following is her review:
"Unnecessary Talking" is a delightful must-read for baby boomers, although anyone curious about a time when childhood was full of freedom and exploration will enjoy Mike O'Connor's tales. Growing up in the 1950s in a small town, he recalls what it was like to have seemingly endless hours to revel in life.
From ballgames, forts, and marbles to puzzling over the mysteries of adult behavior; from a tonsillectomy and cowboys to a first kiss in fifth grade, this collection will warm your heart and keep you grinning. An expecially hilarious tall tale (of the sort O'Connor's father told) will have the reader in stitches as Dr O'Connor and Mike trek to Africa to face the giant snake Menabi. This book will make you feel happy. Get extra copies, because you'll want to share them with friends.
Uaoteowi Uaoteowi
My Dad read one chapter of this book to me every morning for two and a half weeks. A lot of the stories were really funny, but my favorite was the story about the worst thing the author every did! I really liked the part where he did something really naughty and his big sister got to tell on him. I hope you buy this book and read the stories to your kids because your kids will like them. This review is by Abel Parkman Tolpin, age 8.