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eBook A Great, Silly Grin: The British Satire Boom Of The 1960s ePub

eBook A Great, Silly Grin: The British Satire Boom Of The 1960s ePub

by Humphrey Carpenter

  • ISBN: 0306812053
  • Category: Humor
  • Subcategory: Entertainment
  • Author: Humphrey Carpenter
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Da Capo Press; 2nd edition (May 29, 2003)
  • Pages: 408
  • ePub book: 1138 kb
  • Fb2 book: 1796 kb
  • Other: lrf docx mobi doc
  • Rating: 4.3
  • Votes: 102

Description

But as Carpenter elaborates, "Satire's audiences have always tended to come from the very section of society that is being satirized

One can say that satire postulates an ideal condition of man or decency, and then despairs of it; and enjoys the despair masochistically. The secret source of humor itself is not joy but sorrow. But as Carpenter elaborates, "Satire's audiences have always tended to come from the very section of society that is being satirized. Given the success of TW3, which brought in an average of three million viewers, satire came to rely heavily on politics as a crutch.

A Great, Silly Grin: The. has been added to your Cart. From Publishers Weekly. To re-create the anti-establishment era of the 1960s, Carpenter interviewed almost 40 of the top "surviving satirists and their associates," and the result is both authoritative and amusing. Carpenter, best known for his biographies of Dennis Potter, Auden, Pound and Tolkien, sets the scene with the political and cultural backdrop of post-WWII "austere drabness" giving way to subversive antics on radio's Goon Show in 1951. The Edinburgh Festival of music and art began in 1947, and additional entertainments there were known as Festival Fringe.

A Great, Silly Grin book. This text examines the British satire explosion of the early 1960s - from Private Eye and Beyond the Fringe to That Was the Week That Was - and its lasting influence on comedy.

A Great, Silly Grin opens at the 1960 Edinburgh Festival, where a staggeringly inspired satirical .

A Great, Silly Grin opens at the 1960 Edinburgh Festival, where a staggeringly inspired satirical revue called Beyond the Fringe startled a public steeped in the polite, bland banality of the 1950s. The apotheosis of the satire boom, and the progenitor of so many American comedy acts, was the groundbreaking BBC television program "That Was the Week That Was," which combined elements of sketch comedy and evening-news broadcast to produce something essential, hilarious, and, on occasion, scandalous.

Fine in Fine DJ. B&W Photographs ISBN: 1586480812 (Great Britain, Popular Culture, Satire). Other Products from hartmannbooks (View All). Snodgrass, Mary Ellen. Amy Tan: A Literary Companion. From there it is a short trip to the coffee bars of London, where the appearance of a scruffy yellow pamphlet calling itself Private Eye overturned the way Britons looked at their world

A Great, Silly Grin opens at the 1960 Edinburgh Festival, where a staggeringly inspired satirical revue called Beyond the Fringe .

A Great, Silly Grin opens at the 1960 Edinburgh Festival, where a staggeringly inspired satirical revue called Beyond the Fringe startled a public steeped in th. .

the British satire boom of the 1960s. Humphrey Carpenter presents a history of the tumultuous and exciting era that introduced us to "Private Eye" and "That Was the Week That Was". by Humphrey Carpenter. Published 2003 by Da Capo Press in Cambridge, Mass. He covers the people involved in its creation, such as Peter Cook and Dudley Moore, as well as their routines and sketches. Originally published as 'That was the satire that was', London : Gollancz, 2000.

Find many great new & used options and get the best deals for A Great, Silly Grin: The British Satire . item 2 Great Silly Grin by Carpenter, Humphrey -Great Silly Grin by Carpenter, Humphrey. Satire Paperback Books.

item 2 Great Silly Grin by Carpenter, Humphrey -Great Silly Grin by Carpenter, Humphrey. Frederick the Great Paperback Books. This item doesn't belong on this page. From there it is a short trip to the coffee bars of London, where the appearance of a scruffy yellow pamphlet calling itself Private Eye overturned the way Britons looked at their world

A Great, Silly Grin opens at the 1960 Edinburgh Festival, where a staggeringly inspired satirical revue called Beyond the Fringe startled a public steeped in the polite, bland banality of the 1950s. From there it is a short trip to the coffee bars of London, where the appearance of a scruffy yellow pamphlet calling itself Private Eye overturned the way Britons looked at their world. The apotheosis of the satire boom, and the progenitor of so many American comedy acts, was the groundbreaking BBC television program "That Was the Week That Was," which combined elements of sketch comedy and evening-news broadcast to produce something essential, hilarious, and, on occasion, scandalous. Humphrey Carpenter's history of this tumultuous and exciting era introduces us not only to the people involved in its creation--Peter Cook, Dudley Moore, Michael Frayn, Jonathan Miller, Alan Bennett, and David Frost--but also their routines and sketches.

Comments

Kirinaya Kirinaya
Although it has aspirations to social history this is largely celebrity bio. Those who have an interest in Dudley Mooore, John Cleese, David Frost, Alan Benett, Jonathan Miller and so forth, and who remembember Beyond the Fringe and That Was The Week That Was will find it interesting. The number of characters becomes bewildering and boredom sets in as accounts of the obscure and forgotten multiply. It livens up when it recounts some of the skits we thought funny at the time.
It is perhaps deflating to realize that these satirical iconoclasts owed their initial careers to the British governmemt. They got their starts on the payrolls of the government-sponsored Edinburgh Festival and as employes of the British Broadcasting Corporation. Would they have fared as well in an open marketplace? Were they causes or beneficiaries of the breakdown in censorship in the 1960's? Carpenter touches on some of these questions but is, I think, too much in awe of the genius of those he writes about. While undoubtedly entertaining their talents for writing funny things and doing funny imitations were of a kind that is widespread.
Made-with-Love Made-with-Love
The story is not straightforward, which is a major plus. The players pop in and out of the story as they and things develop. It's actually a coherent subject, which I did not expect. There actually was an "era" of satire in Britain, and though satire itself is a cloudy, amorphous concept, Carpenter has woven together all the ingredients of a comprehensive, if not exhaustive history of the concept. That makes this an unusual book, and kept my interest over its 338 pages.

As expected, I learned a great deal about the lives and personalities of the players in Beyond the Fringe, Private Eye and TW3, the three most famous vehicles for satire in the 60s. But of more value was how hey interconnected, for good as well as bad. And of course, how Carpenter sewed them all together in a quilt they did not know they were part of. A most worthwhile endeavour and achievement by Humphrey Carpenter, whose bio of Spike Milligan I've reviewed as well.
Faugami Faugami
Carpenter examines English cultural values during the years immediately following World War Two and focuses specifically on the 1960's when students from Oxford and Cambridge universities (with others) challenged those values with immensely entertaining satire. Theirs were significant contributions to a tradition of creative ridicule which extends back more than 2,500 years. Of course, Chaucer, Shakespeare, and Dickens are among those English authors properly renowned for their comic genius but are not usually thought of primarily as social satirists. Throughout the Age of Victoria and well into the 20th century, the British Empire flourished within a somewhat rigid social order, one which (generally) seemed to lack a sense of humor. By 1960, England had become "a bankrupt, defenseless little country run by a ridiculously elderly prime minister" (Harold Macmillan) when Jonathan Miller, Peter Cooke, Dudley Moore, and Alan Bennett introduced "Beyond the Fringe" at the Edinburgh Festival. Out of that developed Private Eye magazine, The Establishment (a men's cabaret featuring satire), and the BBC's That Was the Week That Was. Carpenter devotes substantial attention to Miller, Cooke, Moore, and Bennett as they and others detonated a "boom" of social satire whose reverberations continued through Second City, Monty Python, and Saturday Night Live. Carpenter duly notes the influence of the Goon Show (Millgan, Sellers, et al) as well as American humorists such as Mort Sahl, Mel Brooks, Lenny Bruce, and Tom Lehrer on their English counterparts. Of special interest to me is Carpenter's suggestion that, as England continued its decline among world powers in the 1960s, social satire served as a medication to deaden the pain. At one point, he reminds his reader of Cook's warning that England was then in danger of "sinking giggling into the sea." That has not as yet happened and never will but the image remains vivid nonetheless.
Vivados Vivados
Just read A Great Silly Grin: The British Satire Boom of the 1960s, by Humprey Carpenter. This period has long been a subject of interest to me despite the fact that I'm too young (and geographically challenged) to have seen most of the programs in the first place.
Besides being a linked series of show business biographies of key figures of the time (The Beyond the Fringe foursome, etc), the book raises some good discussion.
Just how much does satire really matter, if it does at that? As Peter Cook used to say, the peak of satire was 1930's Berlin--and look how much that did to prevent the rise of Hitler.
But the best part of the text may be the final chapter, which paints an unflattering picture of the state of the art in 2000-era Great Britain--and it's sobering how much of it applies to the US as well.