cdc-coteauxdegaronne
» » Crome Yellow by Aldous Huxley, Science Fiction, Classics, Literary
eBook Crome Yellow by Aldous Huxley, Science Fiction, Classics, Literary ePub

eBook Crome Yellow by Aldous Huxley, Science Fiction, Classics, Literary ePub

by Aldous Huxley

  • ISBN: 1603120718
  • Category: Humor
  • Subcategory: Entertainment
  • Author: Aldous Huxley
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Aegypan (February 1, 2007)
  • Pages: 144
  • ePub book: 1248 kb
  • Fb2 book: 1966 kb
  • Other: doc lit txt mbr
  • Rating: 4.8
  • Votes: 818

Description

Home Aldous Huxley Crome Yellow. He was then a young man of twenty-two, with curly yellow hairand a smooth pink face that was the mirror of his youthful and ingenuousmind.

Home Aldous Huxley Crome Yellow. He had been educated at Harrow and Christ Church, he enjoyedhunting and all other field sports, and, though his circumstances werecomfortable to the verge of affluence, his pleasures were temperate andinnocent.

CHAPTER I. Along this particular stretch of line no express had ever passed. Allthe trains-the few that there were-stopped at all the stations. Denis knew the names of those stations by heart. Bole, Tritton,Spavin Delawarr, Knipswich for Timpany, West Bowlby, and, finally,Camlet-on-the-Water. Camlet was where he always got out, leaving thetrain to creep indolently onward, goodness only knew whither, into thegreen heart of England. He selected a book and a comfortable chair, and tried, as far asthe disturbed state of his mind would permit him, to compose himselffor an evening's reading

Mystery & Detective. Home Aldous Huxley Crome Yellow. He selected a book and a comfortable chair, and tried, as far asthe disturbed state of his mind would permit him, to compose himselffor an evening's reading. The lamplight was utterly serene; there was nomovement save the stir of Priscilla among her papers.

Aldous Leonard Huxley (26 July 1894 – 22 November 1963) was an English writer and philosopher. He wrote nearly fifty books-both novels and non-fiction works-as well as wide-ranging essays, narratives, and poems. Born into the prominent Huxley family, he graduated from Balliol College, Oxford with an undergraduate degree in English literature

In the book, Huxley satirises the fads and fashions of the time. The Crome of this novel's title is an English Country House in which most of the action occurs.

In the book, Huxley satirises the fads and fashions of the time. Aldous Huxley's first novel, Crome Yellow, was published in 1921, and, as a comedy of manners and ideas, its relatively realistic setting and format may come as a surprise to fans of his later works such as Point Counter Point and Brave New World

Crome Yellow is the first novel by British author Aldous Huxley, published in 1921. In the book, Huxley satirises the fads and fashions of the time.

Crome Yellow is the first novel by British author Aldous Huxley, published in 1921. It is the story of a house party at Crome, a parodic version of Garsington Manor, home of Lady Ottoline Morrell, a house where authors such as Huxley and T. S. Eliot used to gather and write. The book contains a brief pre-figuring of Huxley's later novel, Brave New World

Aldous Huxley’s first novel, Crome Yellow, was published in 1921, and, as a. .

Aldous Huxley’s first novel, Crome Yellow, was published in 1921, and, as a comedy of manners and ideas, its relatively realistic setting and format may come as a surprise to fans of his later works such as Point Counter Point and Brave New World. English novelist and philosopher Aldous Huxley is famous today for his dystopian science fiction novel ‘Brave New World’, which went on to inspire countless other authors and forms of media. Huxley also wrote learned non-fiction books, including ‘The Doors of Perception’, detailing his experiences with the hallucinogenic drugs and ‘The Perennial Philosophy’, revealing his growing interest in Hindu mysticism.

Literature and Science. Aldous Huxley - Crome Yellow.

Crome Yellow by Aldous Huxley, Science Fiction, Classics, Literary 9781603129763. Brave New World (The Great Writers Library) by Aldous Huxley Book The Cheap Fast.

In the book, Huxley satirizes the fads and fashions of the time. The Crome of the novel's title is an English Country House in which most of the action occurs.

Aldous Huxley's first novel, Crome Yellow, was published in 1921, and, as a comedy of manners and ideas, its relatively realistic setting and format may come as a surprise to fans of his later works such as Point Counter Point and Brave New World. Some who know only Brave New World may not know that as a 16-year-old planning to enter medicine, Aldous Huxley was stricken by a serious eye disease which left him temporarily blind and which derailed what certainly would have been a prominent career as a physician or scientist.

Crome Yellow has often been called "witty," as well as "talky," and it certainly owes as much to Vanity Fair as it may, surprisingly to some, owe to Tristram Shandy, although one might think that characters such as Mr. Barbecue-Smith and his remarkable writing theories could have some literary antecedents in Lawrence Sterne.

Comments

Skyway Skyway
This novel, published in 1921, was Huxley's first. While it touches upon some serious issues, (note a passing conversation that prefigures a bit of "Brave New World"), it is mostly a send up of various literary, and actual, "types" and of the entire country house genre. Our hero is the rather superficial, confused and unobservant Denis, but his naiveté actually spares him from Huxley's most withering observations. That said, Huxley was rather young himself, and his version of "withering" drifts often enough into the comic, witty, and indulgent, which makes the whole book lighter and more entertaining than it might otherwise have been. There is satire, and snark, and some wonderful word-smithing, but nothing of the sour, bitter or vengeful that one occasionally encounters in the work of older and more battle hardened satirists.

This is the sort of book I've been sitting on for years, waiting for a chance to get around to it. Since it is available as a Kindle freebie, being in the public domain, I seized that opportunity to give a read. If you like banter, decent conversation, some consciously showy writing, and country house scenes with the occasional bit of bracing satire, this might suit just fine. (Interesting aside. The other freebie I read right before this was Fitzgerald's "This Side of Paradise". It was published the same time as this, was also a debut novel, and uses Princeton as the American equivalent of a country house getaway. Read them side by side for a very rewarding experience. As they say in Lit. 101 - compare and contrast.)

I read the free download of this book on a Kindle Touch. The book is well formatted and presents well on the Kindle. The native font is fine, but all the Kindle options - font selection, font size, line spacing, and margins - work properly. The Kindle "Go To" function was a satisfactory option for navigation. There are no notes or annotations, and no editor foreword or supplementary material. This is a bare bones, but faithful, transcription of the text. This copy avoids the dreaded error where a letter, (usually "f" or "t" for some reason), has been omitted everywhere in the text. The text here is clean. There are no odd page breaks, no paragraphing problems, no garbled sentences, and no other format issues.

Bottom line - this is an excellent choice for browsing or experimenting and a nice freebie find. Actually, it is an entertaining and rewarding read in whatever form or edition you can find it.
Kulafyn Kulafyn
Publication date: 1921

Huxley's first novel, written in imitation of such books as Headlong Hall and South Wind.

A country visit is the occasion for the wine and conversation to flow freely- thus, the fledgling poet Denis, the older intellectual, Scogan, somewhat past his prime, Wimbush, the antiquarian, who has some pretty entertaining accounts of his ancestors (really just short stories- like many a first novel, it has the flavor of a "Collected Works.")

I'd even call it a 'young adult' novel, insofar as the protagonist, Denis, is preoccupied with his lack of success with women. Of course, it would be for young adults studying for their SATs- I counted five 'SAT words' in one sentence at one point:

"... For the sake of peace and quiet Denis had retired earlier on this same afternoon to his bedroom. He wanted to work, but the hour was a drowsy one, and lunch, so recently eaten, weighed heavily on body and mind. The *meridian* demon was upon him; he was possessed by that bored and hopeless *post-prandial* melancholy which the *coenobites* of old knew and feared under the name of "accidie."

(Note that he solves the problem with something unavailable to the 'coenobites of old,' namely gin.)

My favorite 'set piece' in this assemblage of set pieces, one I remember well from twenty years ago, is Denis explaining to Scogan how poetical and marvelous the word 'carminative' seemed until, using it in a poem, he has to look up the meaning.

"... And now"—Denis spread out his hands, palms upwards, despairingly—"now I know what carminative really means."

"Well, what DOES it mean?" asked Mr. Scogan, a little impatiently.

"Carminative," said Denis, lingering lovingly over the syllables, "carminative. I imagined vaguely that it had something to do with carmen-carminis, still more vaguely with caro-carnis, and its derivations, like carnival and carnation. Carminative—there was the idea of singing and the idea of flesh, rose-coloured and warm, with a suggestion of the jollities of mi-Careme and the masked holidays of Venice. Carminative—the warmth, the glow, the interior ripeness were all in the word. Instead of which..."
Whitecaster Whitecaster
I liked this book quite a bit and I am surprised at the negative comments by some of the reviewers. It does contain quite a bit of ironic humor and a plentiful cast of interesting characters with a great deal of comic interaction. There are two chapters which are part of the "history" of the Crome estate; and these two chapters are totally delightful. This is a much easier book to read on Kindle than it would be in print because of quick access to the dictionary which is, alas, necessary because of Huxley's gratuitous use of arcane and archaic words. But if one can overlook that irritant, then this is a very enjoyable book and not one to be taken too seriously. I especially loved the idea that one character, an Anglican minister, put forth that the Pope and the Jesuits were to blame for the (first) World War That kept me laughing for an hour! And then there is the old guy dressed in drag as a gypsy fortune teller for the fair . . .
Hra Hra
The English country house weekend is given the treatment here. This is a satire of this event, the basis for many hundreds of novels. All the characters are some what exaggerated as to be expected of a satire, but the mix allows the author to express his ideas and views on everything.

We have unrequited love, the 'cad', the women who are- beautiful, strange, beguiling and weird. The master of the house is delightfully eccentric and the house "Crome" has a story itself.

This is Huxley's first book but the ideas for 'Brave New World' are already being thought through and discussed here.

This is a short read but Huxley gives you much to think about .