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eBook The Hottest Dishes of the Tartar Cuisine ePub

eBook The Hottest Dishes of the Tartar Cuisine ePub

by Tim Mohr,Alina Bronsky

  • ISBN: 160945006X
  • Category: Humor
  • Subcategory: Entertainment
  • Author: Tim Mohr,Alina Bronsky
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Europa Editions; 1st edition (April 26, 2011)
  • Pages: 262
  • ePub book: 1811 kb
  • Fb2 book: 1510 kb
  • Other: azw docx rtf lit
  • Rating: 4.5
  • Votes: 415

Description

ISBN 978-1-60945-956-7 (World). Of the tartar cuisine. That way the sea buckthorns kept through the winter

ISBN 978-1-60945-956-7 (World). Translated from the German. crude expressions in Tartar. Understanding these vulgarities. helps one read and manage a variety of situations. That way the sea buckthorns kept through the winter. Now I mixed spoonfuls of the puree into hot water and gave it to Sulfia to drink so she’d get some vitamins. She sniffled and groaned, but my labors paid off. After a few days Sulfia stopped bleeding and was able to get out of bed and make it to the bathroom on her own.

Alina Bronsky has created one of the most unforgettable fictional mothers of all times in this book. Rosalinda is a Tartar in every sense of the word

Alina Bronsky has created one of the most unforgettable fictional mothers of all times in this book. Rosalinda is a Tartar in every sense of the word. We meet her and her family in Russia, where she and her husband have made every effort to cleanse themselves of ethic characteristics and become pure vanilla Soviets. But there's no taking the Tartar out of Rosie. She has a will of iron, nerves of steel, and courage enough for any battle. She knows what's best for everyone and takes charge of the lives of others with astonishing confidence and terrifying competence.

Publishers Weekly Best Book of the Year Finalist for the German Book .

In her second novel, Russian-born Alina Bronsky gives readers a moving portrait of the devious limits of the will to survive. Told with sly humor and an anthropologist’s eye for detail, The Hottest Dishes of the Tartar Cuisine is the story of three unforgettable women whose destinies are tangled up in a family dynamic that is at turns hilarious and tragic.

She moved to Germany when she was thirteen. Alina Bronsky, The Hottest Dishes of the Tartar Cuisine. Thank you for reading books on GrayCity.

by Alina Bronsky & translated by Tim Mohr. The grandmother takes over supervision of her education, hitting Aminat and withholding affection when she’s less than perfect-which it so happens is much of the time. Typical of their interaction is Rosa’s promise to Aminat that if she agrees to certain behaviors for three months, Rosa will get her a cat. Aminat is compliant, and they go to a city market to get the cat, but when a vendor wants to charge a high price, the grandmother refuses to pa.

Alina Bronsky, Tim Mohr (Translator). This book has been translated into English, as The Hottest Dishes of the Tartar Cuisine. Alina Bronsky’s darkly ironic and grimly comical book overflows with black humour

Alina Bronsky, Tim Mohr (Translator). These days, most horrific parenting tales are told from the view of the victim. Alina Bronsky’s darkly ironic and grimly comical book overflows with black humour. It turned out to be a perfect tool for painting the absurdities of everyday life in a communist country. Oddly enough, though I'm not especially fond of black comedy, ‘The Hottest Dishes of the Tartar Cuisine’ made me chuckle hysterically a few times.

Translation of: Die schärfsten Gerichte der tatarischen Küche. Rosa's schemes to abort her daughter Sulfia's fetus after learning of the pregnancy, take her granddaughter Aminat after the baby's birth, and move the family out of the Soviet Union eventually lead to tragedy.

Alina Bronsky care, as fondness for the entir.

Alina Bronsky care, as fondness for the entire family, as interest in my marmalade. His interest in my marmalade was genuine, that much was true. In Germany, said Dieter, marmalade was made quickly, with gelling sugar-sugar mixed with pectin-and ended up an acidic, jellyfish-like blob. Broken Glass Park, nominated for one of Europe's most prestigious literary awards, the Ingeborg Bachmann Prize, is her first novel. Alina Bronsky is a pseudonym. 5 2. What Our Readers Are Saying.

Publishers Weekly Best Book of the Year Finalist for the German Book Award Favorite Read of the Year in the Huffington Post and the Wall Street JournalIn her second novel, Russian-born Alina Bronsky gives readers a moving portrait of the devious limits of the will to survive. The narrator of this rollicking family saga is the outrageously mischevious Rosa Achmetowna, whom The Millions calls "one of the most fascinating women in the world."When she discovers that her seventeen-year-old daughter, “stupid Sulfia,” is pregnant by an unknown man she does everything to thwart the pregnancy, employing a variety of folkloric home remedies. But despite her best efforts the baby, Aminat, is born nine months later at Soviet Birthing Center Number 134. Much to Rosa’s surprise and delight, dark eyed Aminat is a Tartar through and through and instantly becomes the apple of her grandmother’s eye. While her good for nothing husband Kalganow spends his days feeding pigeons and contemplating death at the city park, Rosa wages an epic struggle to wrestle Aminat away from Sulfia, whom she considers a woefully inept mother. When Aminat, now a wild and willful teenager, catches the eye of a sleazy German cookbook writer researching Tartar cuisine, Rosa is quick to broker a deal that will guarantee all three women a passage out of the Soviet Union. But as soon as they are settled in the West, the uproariously dysfunctional ties that bind mother, daughter and grandmother begin to fray. Told with sly humor and an anthropologist’s eye for detail, The Hottest Dishes of the Tartar Cuisine is the story of three unforgettable women whose destinies are tangled up in a family dynamic that is at turns hilarious and tragic.

Comments

Bukus Bukus
Alina Bronsky's book is a dark, sneering monologue by one of the world's great survivors... Tatar babushka from hell, Rosalinda. After growing up in an Orphanage post-The Great Patriotic War, not really ready or wanting to be a mother or grandmother, she's one of the great "unreliable narrators" except that once you understand her, her attitudes are completely understandable. Live your life, don't expose yourself to germs, filth and disgusting people (like her husband), avoid stupid and naive persons who waste your time (like her daughter Sulfia) and recognize brilliance and beauty when you see it (like her grandaughter Aminat... a Rosalinda clone in training). It mostly takes place in the falling apart USSR of the 1980s in some nameless city (I'm thinking Kazan or Ufa) with no running water, empty shelves in the stores and a population getting shabbier and shabbier. Into this walks a male German cookbook author trying to find authentic folk recipes and Rosalinda feels exploiting him is her family's last chance to get out of their hellhole. I can see this as a book many American's will find unpleasant... the main character isn't lovable and it's loaded with tough Soviet cynicism which many in this country will strain to understand. Growing up with a family from Central/Eastern Europe, Rosalinda and her brood seemed extremely familiar to me. I found it hilarious (but your mileage may vary) and wanting to read Ms. Bronsky's first book. It's a great keyhole view into SAVAK (Soviet culture) living. My only minor qualm was the spelling of the Russian/Tatar names in the translation... they were all spelled to read like Polish names... but otherwise, the translator seems to have done a wonderful job capturing the flair, sarcasm and humor of the original.
Malahelm Malahelm
Alina Bronsky has created one of the most unforgettable fictional mothers of all times in this book. Rosalinda is a Tartar in every sense of the word. We meet her and her family in Russia, where she and her husband have made every effort to cleanse themselves of ethic characteristics and become pure vanilla Soviets.

But there's no taking the Tartar out of Rosie. She has a will of iron, nerves of steel, and courage enough for any battle. She knows what's best for everyone and takes charge of the lives of others with astonishing confidence and terrifying competence. Her daughter fears her. Her granddaughter adores her and hates her. Men find Rose sexy, because she's beautiful and eternally young, or thinks she is, which is just as good. Even God finds Rosie hard to withstand, and answers her prayers promptly (mostly).

I loved Rosie. So what if she's manipulative, critical and belligerent. She has genius, and passion.

The plot follows Rosie's machinations as she looks after her family in a disintegrating Russia, and finally contrives to relocate them to the capitalist paradise of Germany. To be honest, Rosie does some despicable things along the way, but always for a good cause. Can't we identify with that a little?

The Hottest Dishes is roll-your-eyes hilarious and chock full of shocks and crises. But it's not a romp. There's plenty of heartbreak for Rosie and the reader to work their way through.

Utterly original and profoundly unconventional, this novel can't be summed up any more easily than Rose can. I suspect Rosie even managed to overpower her author, becoming a heroine despite Bronsky's best efforts to control her!

I enjoyed Bronsky's first novel, Broken Glass Park, but The Hottest Dishes is even more wonderful. Like all Europa Editions, the book is beautifully produced.
Hucama Hucama
To be Rosalinda's daughter would be the kiss of death. She and only she is important. Just ask her. If she weren't there to pick up and repair all the pieces, life would indeed be sad, and broken. Just ask her. Never have I read a character so exhausting, perfect? and funny. (Of course, again she is not my mother). Every page was an oh, no! or, what? or Oh, my God! or, Do you believe? or is she for real?
This author is a genius and every page she wrote is a gem. Rosalinda gets whatever she wants and believes everyone is lucky to be around her and perhaps they think so too, so they stay away from her for a long time. Amazon, thank you.
Opithris Opithris
Interesting book. I can't say I liked the central character, but I felt she was so complex that I could feel empathy for her at times. I found it was great exposure to Russian culture.
MrRipper MrRipper
I enjoyed it. It was not terribly gratifying or pleasant. In some cases it was heartbreaking. It occurred to me when it was finished that I felt sympathy for the protagonist, despite the terrible things she had done. Perhaps that was the point.
Friert Friert
Don't miss this one-- I keep recommending it. SO unique, funny, thoughtful, informative.
Fearlessdweller Fearlessdweller
Books you can't put down are such a joy. This is one of them. I wanted to finish it in one go but I've paced myself so there is something to make me laugh, anytime, for a while. Occasional typos or spelling errors (e.g., Caucuses instead of Caucasus) distract the reader a little. I wish the publishers had ensured the book went out without them. The story deserved it.