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eBook A Fraction of the Whole: A Novel ePub

eBook A Fraction of the Whole: A Novel ePub

by Steve Toltz

  • ISBN: 0385521731
  • Category: Humor
  • Subcategory: Entertainment
  • Author: Steve Toltz
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Spiegel & Grau; Reprint edition (September 23, 2008)
  • Pages: 576
  • ePub book: 1587 kb
  • Fb2 book: 1352 kb
  • Other: lrf mobi mbr doc
  • Rating: 4.9
  • Votes: 770

Description

A Fraction of the Whole is that rarest of long books–utterly worth i. he story starts in a prison riot and ends .

Steve Toltz has written a masterpiece, a smashing debut that will long be remembered as a colossal example of just how good fiction can be. He keeps you wired to the page from the jump and he defies gravity all the way to the end. -Ain’t It Cool News. First novels these days too seldom dare to raise their voices above an elegant whisper or an ironic murmur.

The fact is, the whole of Australia despises my father perhaps more than any other man, just as they adore his brother, my uncle, perhaps more than any other ma. I should also say this just to get it out of the way

The fact is, the whole of Australia despises my father perhaps more than any other man, just as they adore his brother, my uncle, perhaps more than any other man. I might as well set the story straight about both of them, though I don’t intend to undermine your love for my uncle or reverse your hatred for my father, especially if it’s an expansive hatred. I don’t want to spoil things if you use your hate to quicken your awareness of who you love. I should also say this just to get it out of the way

A Fraction of the Whole is a 2008 novel by Steve Toltz. It follows three generations of the eccentric Dean family in Australia and the people who surround them.

A Fraction of the Whole is a 2008 novel by Steve Toltz. Jasper Dean is Martin Dean's illegitimate son and Terry Dean's nephew. He narrates most of the novel, save some sections which are narrated by Martin. Jasper's difficult relationship with his father is the central subject of the book, and he leads a confused childhood due to Martin's constant bizarre lessons and diatribes.

Steve Toltz's debut novel, A Fraction of the Whole, takes the form of Martin Dean's confession of his failures and .

Steve Toltz's debut novel, A Fraction of the Whole, takes the form of Martin Dean's confession of his failures and hopes to his son, Jasper. Dante's Paradiso is more rollicking than this. It's a fat book but very light on its feet, skipping from anecdote, to rant, to reflection, like a stone skimming across a pond. His bad-tempered, regretful voice gives the book a unity and immediacy that makes it feel less like a novel and more like a stand-up routine (the book it reminded me of most was Alexei Sayle's brilliant Overtaken).

A Fraction of the Whole book. I kept feeling the real reason for the book was to give Toltz a philosophical platform. Although I remember little about this novel’s content, I remember it came along to torture me at the right time in my life-I fought and squabbled with its cruelty, I railed against its brutal wisdom and maddening honesty. This is how you write a first novel. I never remembered which character was voicing which opinion, and I can’t tell from reading some quotes I saved. But I enjoyed them anyway.

A Fraction of the Whole is an uproarious indictment of the modern world and its mores and the epic debut of the blisteringly funny and talented Steve Toltz. The Fraction of the Whole failed for me. The reasons remain unclear. Perhaps it is a younger soul's predilection, like skinny jeans. Novels which yearn to be hilarious seldom are, at least to me. This.

Steve Toltz hails from Australia, where the badgering first person runs deep, so A Fraction of the Whole, his 530-page debut, grows in the shadow of great expectations. But can it do more than just talk our ears off?

Steve Toltz hails from Australia, where the badgering first person runs deep, so A Fraction of the Whole, his 530-page debut, grows in the shadow of great expectations. But can it do more than just talk our ears off? The opening pages promise dire familial drama. Jasper Dean is trapped in a prison with a large chip on his shoulder. One thing’s for sure, he says. My father punished me for existing, and now it’s my turn to punish him for existing. Before long, Toltz is passing the narrative conch from Jasper to his father, Martin, and back again.

Steve Toltz's novel, A Fraction of the Whole, may clock in at almost 600 pages, but this .

Steve Toltz's novel, A Fraction of the Whole, may clock in at almost 600 pages, but this bizarre adventure from prison to Paris is worth i. The year is two months old. But this is the book of a two-month-old year. It may well carry the whole thing.

Book Summary A Fraction of the Whole is his first novel. Still not very illuminating, though, so it was time to investigate.

A Fraction of the Whole is an uproarious indictment of the modern world and its mores - a rollicking rollercoaster ride from obscurity to infamy, and the moving, memorable story of a father and son whose spiritual symmetry transcends all their many shortcomings. Steve Toltz the man is as laconic as his character Martin Dean is loquacious. The author bio on the book jacket simply reads: "Steve Toltz resides in Sydney, Australia. A Fraction of the Whole is his first novel.

Meet the Deans“The fact is, the whole of Australia despises my father more than any other man, just as they adore my uncle more than any other man. I might as well set the story straight about both of them . . .”Heroes or Criminals?Crackpots or Visionaries?Families or Enemies?“. . . Anyway, you know how it is. Every family has a story like this one.”Most of his life, Jasper Dean couldn’t decide whether to pity, hate, love, or murder his certifiably paranoid father, Martin, a man who overanalyzed anything and everything and imparted his self-garnered wisdom to his only son. But now that Martin is dead, Jasper can fully reflect on the crackpot who raised him in intellectual captivity, and what he realizes is that, for all its lunacy, theirs was a grand adventure.As he recollects the events that led to his father’s demise, Jasper recounts a boyhood of outrageous schemes and shocking discoveries—about his infamous outlaw uncle Terry, his mysteriously absent European mother, and Martin’s constant losing battle to make a lasting mark on the world he so disdains. It’s a story that takes them from the Australian bush to the cafes of bohemian Paris, from the Thai jungle to strip clubs, asylums, labyrinths, and criminal lairs, and from the highs of first love to the lows of failed ambition. The result is a rollicking rollercoaster ride from obscurity to infamy, and the moving, memorable story of a father and son whose spiritual symmetry transcends all their many shortcomings.A Fraction of the Whole is an uproarious indictment of the modern world and its mores and the epic debut of the blisteringly funny and talented Steve Toltz.

Comments

Impala Frozen Impala Frozen
Wanted this book to be over and done with about half way through, but I was compelled to finish it. Too much time and effort invested to just quit. All those pages of rants and ramblings and self-analysis. Enough introspection to cause me to pull out my hair. This book is exhausting. It grabs you and forces you to listen to these terribly annoying characters for whom you have no sympathy. Every so often I just wanted to scream "Get on with it, will you?" So you ask, why fight on to the end? Because buried within all that maddening BS, are insights and truth. And it's beautifully written.
Narim Narim
How can a book that is so brilliant, so inventive, and so often laugh-out-loud funny, be so tiresome? It's not because Mr. Toltz doesn't know when to stop, it's simply that he can't. Even worse, all his characters -- kids, adults, criminals, madmen, women -- all sound exactly the same. Endlessly cracking wise with the same smartass voice. It doesn't feel like you're in a world, more like you're just inside the author's head, listening to him try on a series of masks, pretending to be different characters, but the tone of the voice, the rhythm of the speeches, the sarcasm and misanthropic whimsy just go on and on and on, never changing, never letting up. I made it just past page 300, and had to stop. Lots of raw virtuoso talent on display, but even fireworks can bore you into a stupor if they go on long enough.
anneli anneli
Let me preface by saying that I dislike giving 5 stars. I try to reserve 5 for the books that deserve it, for fear that anyone glancing at my review will think it's one of the fakes. Well, this one definitely deserves it, my review is not false, and I absolutely adored this book.
I couldn't put it down! It dominated my life! I fell into Jasper's tale like a hailstone, laughing maniacally with a hand over my mouth. It's deliciously irreverent, irreverently profound, and profoundly entertaining. Mr. Toltz writes with an insightful wit that is a joy to lay your eyes on. Every other page I'd be thinking, "how can I find some way to work this into conversation?" But then, "who do I know who'd actually get it?" And finally, "I need to get better friends."
I just this moment finished reading it. I'm sorry about that. I would have willingly turned my back on real life for many more days in order to submerse myself in the story of the Deans. It's just that good.
I'd like to give a short description of the story, but other than a bland blurb like "a son writes the story of his life with his quirky father in relatively modern-day Australia", I'm totally unable to reduce this novel into anything even approximating a back-cover quote. It made me laugh, I mean 'drop your hand into your lap and tilt your head back' laughing. It made me look at my life and wonder what to do next. It reinforced my plan to check out if things get too bad. It made me look at my family and wonder if I was somehow swapped at the hospital directly after birth.
So yes, it's thought-provoking. And did I say it's funny? I just. Plain. Loved it.
Enjoy.
Yojin Yojin
We have crazy, unlikable characters who do nothing useful, positive and worry about death--or the fear of it. They get caught up in impossible situations, have bizarre relationships with other weird characters (oh really?) ... and yet... and yet I kept reading till my eyes ached and eagerly awaited reading at the next chance. I know this novel was published in 2008, but I'd swear that it is so filled with truthiness and alternative facts, exaggerations and egos that it reads as current events. My star rating could be one or five--I chose five because--I don't know why but that's where I'm leaning.
huckman huckman
This book has a good blurb and after reading the beginning, I expected a wry, witty story. Although Toltz has a way with words, he uses way too many. As the book went on and on, I found the characters less and less appealing. There are long stretches of just the rambling thoughts of the unlikable characters. Many female characters meet violent ends. It felt like the main characters of Martin, Jasper and Terry had no consciences, empathy or compassion and gravitated toward the darker side of life. I read the entire book, over 500 pages hoping at least one of them would turn around and redeem themselves in some way but I liked them less and less as the story went on. I understand some readers found this book quirky with bits of lucid truth, but for me, it wasn't worth wading through 500 plus pages.