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eBook Star Wars: Episode 1 The Making of The Phantom Menace ePub

eBook Star Wars: Episode 1 The Making of The Phantom Menace ePub

by Laurent Bouzereau

  • ISBN: 0345916352
  • Category: Movies
  • Subcategory: Entertainment
  • Author: Laurent Bouzereau
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Del Rey (May 26, 1999)
  • ePub book: 1472 kb
  • Fb2 book: 1786 kb
  • Other: rtf azw lit doc
  • Rating: 4.7
  • Votes: 252

Description

Bouzereau, Laurent; Duncan, Jody. Star wars, episode I, the phantom menace (Motion picture), Star Wars films, Science fiction films.

Bouzereau, Laurent; Duncan, Jody. New York : Ballantine.

Star Wars: The Making of Episode I is your exclusive entrée backstage where the wonders of the newest chapter in the Star Wars saga are brought to life, including

Star Wars: The Making of Episode I is your exclusive entrée backstage where the wonders of the newest chapter in the Star Wars saga are brought to life, including. A series of exclusive interviews with George Lucas as he discusses the genesis of the Star Wars story, from themes to scenes to dialogue. Laurent Bouzereau and Jody Duncan wrote an easy-to-read book that covers the making of Star Wars Episode I: The Phantom Menace, complete with behind-the-scenes photographs.

Star Wars: The Making of Episode I is your exclusive entrée backstage where the wonders of the newest chapter in the . It is definitely interesting to read this book in 2013 knowing how Phantom Menace would be received

Star Wars: The Making of Episode I is your exclusive entrée backstage where the wonders of the newest chapter in the Star Wars saga are brought to life, including. It is definitely interesting to read this book in 2013 knowing how Phantom Menace would be received. The tone of this book reflects the excitement fans felt before the movies which is no longer around. Being a huge Star Wars fan, I found the tone somewhat nostalgic and the book helped me appreciate Phantom Menace a little more.

In 1977, George Lucas brought Star Wars to the big screen-and made science-fiction cinema history

In 1977, George Lucas brought Star Wars to the big screen-and made science-fiction cinema history. Star Wars: The Making of Episode I is your exclusive entree to the behind-the-scenes world where the wonders of the newest chapter in the Star Wars saga are brought to life by masters of movie-making magic. Join authors Laurent Bouzereau and Jody Duncan.

Author: Laurent Bouzereau, Jody Duncan. We are aware of 10 similar reference publications related to "Star Wars". Von Star Wars bis Indiana Jones Das beste aus den Lucasfilm-Archiven. ISBN-13: 978-0345431196. Mark Cotta Vaz, Shinji Hata. Star Wars George Lucas und die Schöpfungen. John Knoll mit J. W. Rinzler.

The Making of Episode I: The Phantom Menace, written by Laurent Bouzereau and Jody Duncan, was also released in 1999 and features candid tales of the production direct from writer and director George Lucas, the cast, and the crew of one of the most anticipated films in history. In addition, Lucasfilm produced a number of behind-the-scenes features for web and home video that explored the making of the movie. Here are 20 behind-the-scenes facts and anecdotes straight from the people who were there! 1. George Lucas wrote the Episode I script by hand with just pencil and notebook paper.

by Laurent Bouzereau. The Ultimate Behind-the-Scenes Tour de Force In 1977, George Lucas brought Star Wars to the big screen-and made cinema history.

Star Wars: The Making of Episode I The Phantom Menace is a reference book co-authored by Laurent Bouzereau and Jody Duncan. It was published by Del Rey for the United States and by Random House for the United Kingdom in May 1999

Star Wars: The Making of Episode I The Phantom Menace is a reference book co-authored by Laurent Bouzereau and Jody Duncan. It was published by Del Rey for the United States and by Random House for the United Kingdom in May 1999.

Comments

Warianys Warianys
I was so excited to read this before the movie because I wanted to know what was going to happen and couldn't wait for the movie to come out. I was also impressed that unlike the Star Wars trilogy that had been released bound together, this actually read like a real book and not like a screenplay trying to pretend to be a book.
Fegelv Fegelv
I was only luke warm on the movie, which may explain why I was only lukewarm on the book. As with most beginning books/movies, the pace is sort of slow and not a lot happens. The most pivotal event in this book was the death of Qui-Gon at the hands of Darth Maul and the council's reluctant acceptance to let Obi-Wan train Anakin as a Jedi. I got the feeling that they only did it because Qui-Gon was killed.

It also provided a good base for the character of Anakin. Something I found really ironic and kind of weird was how Anakin spent the night with a Tusken raider. Ironic because he slaughters the entire camp in the next episode. Jar-Jar was every bit as annoying in the book as in the movie. The other parts were kind of hum-drum.

I did not like the characterization of Obi-Wan in this book. A bit of a snob, isn't he? There were points in the book where he was a little stuck up and other points where was just a plain jerk! Especially towards Anakin. In general the Obi-Wan in these new episodes contrasts greatly from the original Obi-Wan. The original Obi-Wan is a lot nicer, and more good natured.

Also, Lucas and Brooks sort of contrasted their original first episode (now episode IV) with this book by introducing Qui-Gon. In the original episodes, Yoda was officially Obi-Wan's master. Did you notice how similar Anakin was to Qui-Gon? Both Anakin and Obi-Wan felt completely lost after after Qui-Gon's death. And let's face it: Obi-Wan was in no way ready to train Anakin-he was far too young and did not have enough experience. (As usual, Yoda was right...annoying isn't it?) Even though it was destined that Obi-Wan and Anakin be brought together for the sake of a good movie let's face it: Anakin would not have turned to the dark side if Qui-Gon has been his mentor instead of Obi-Wan.
Dianazius Dianazius
There are extra scenes that are not in the movie, characters thoughts are revealed and there is extra dialogue. I liked the movie but the book gives insights into characters, actions and scenes that are not possible in the movie.
There is a good pace to the book and I found it enjoyable.
This edition also has a short story Darth Maul: End Game. This expands Darth Mauls' backstory and fills in gaps in the film with what he was doing 'offscrene'. In this story we see more of Dath Sidious and what he expects from Darth Maul.
This is also an enjoyable story
Fog Fog
I'm a huge Star Wars fan and never really had read one of the books that were adapted from the movie until this one. I remember reading the first time I did back when the movie had just came out and I can remember how I spent every second I could reading this book. If you're a star wars fan like me you'll definitely enjoy the book. I love this book as it makes the movie even better as the book goes into more detail of the story line and plot that you just felt like there was something missing there in the movie. The book is very well written by Terry Brooks the detail and the thoughtfulness that was put into this book is just amazing! I love to read this over and over still!
Ausstan Ausstan
This is one of the few times that I can say, with all honesty, "See the movie - it's much better than the book." Terry Brooks has his fans - I am not one of them. He brings his usual sophomoric prose style and sloppy character development to this outing. While diehard StarWars fans should probably read this for the extra background information , I would advise taking some of Brooks' assumptions with a grain of salt. He ascribes motivations and emotions to characters, particularly Obi Wan, that are not supported by action in either the Phantom Menace or the first trilogy. Maybe he knows something we don't but I doubt it. Brooks has a habit of creating emotional conflicts for his characters than never end up effecting the plot. I suspect he's at it again here.