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eBook Animating Culture: Hollywood Cartoons from the Sound Era (Communications, Media, and Culture Series) ePub

eBook Animating Culture: Hollywood Cartoons from the Sound Era (Communications, Media, and Culture Series) ePub

by Eric Smoodin

  • ISBN: 0813519489
  • Category: Movies
  • Subcategory: Entertainment
  • Author: Eric Smoodin
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Rutgers University Press (June 1, 1993)
  • Pages: 240
  • ePub book: 1315 kb
  • Fb2 book: 1610 kb
  • Other: azw docx rtf azw
  • Rating: 4.9
  • Votes: 337

Description

Eric Smoodin's Animating Culture is the first and only book to thoroughly analyze the animated short film. Usually running about seven or eight minutes, cartoons were made by major Hollywood studios - such as MGM, Warner Bros

Eric Smoodin's Animating Culture is the first and only book to thoroughly analyze the animated short film. Usually running about seven or eight minutes, cartoons were made by major Hollywood studios - such as MGM, Warner Bros. and Disney - and shown at movie theaters along with a newsreel and a feature-length film. Smoodin explores animated shorts and the system that mass-produced them. How were cartoons exhibited in theaters? How did they tell their stories?

Animating Culture book. Smoodin reveals the complex relationship between cartoons and the Hollywood studio system, and between cartoons and their audiences.

Animating Culture book.

Animating Culture : Hollywood Cartoons from the Sound Era. by Eric Smoodin. Long considered "children's entertainment" by audiences and popular media, Hollywood animation has received little serious attention. Eric Smoodin's Animating Culture is the first and only book to thoroughly analyze the animated short film. Usually running about seven or eight minutes, cartoons were made by major Hollywood studios-such as MGM, Warner Bros. and Disney-and shown at movie theaters along with a newsreel and a feature-length film.

Animating Culture: Hollywood Cartoons from the Sound Era. Make your animation say what you want it to say. Animation's potential as a powerful tool for communication is just beginning to be understood. This book reveals key principles, useful for both professionals and beginners, which will help you harness the full power of this exciting and ever expanding medium. Animation-Art and Industry.

73 results for hollywood cartoons. Shipping to Russian Federation.

The Culture series is a science fiction series written by Scottish author Iain M. Banks. The stories centre on the Culture, a utopian, post-scarcity space society of humanoids, aliens, and very advanced artificial intelligences living in socialist habitats spread across the Milky Way galaxy.

Smoodin, Eric (1993) Animating Culture: Hollywood Cartoons from the Sound Era. New Brunswick, NJ: Rutgers University Press. Snow, Nancy (2002) Propaganda, Inc: Selling America's Culture to the World, 2nd edn. New York: Seven Stories Press. Snow, Nancy (2003) Information War: American Propaganda, Free Speech and Opinion Control Since 9/11.

Taylor, Philip M. Munitions of the Mind: A History of Propaganda from the Ancient World to the Present Day. New Brunswick, NJ: Rutgers University Press, 1993. Taylor, Philip M. New York: Manchester University Press, 2003. Tedlow, Richard S. Keeping the Corporate Image: Public Relations and Business, 1900–1950.

MA, Media, Culture, and Communication. Doctoral student Michelle Pfeifer has received a dissertation fieldwork grant from the Wenner-Gren Foundation. You will analyze media and culture in the context of globalization and emerging technologies. PhD, Media, Culture, and Communication. Charlton McIlwain Looks at Diversity and Inclusion in Computing Industry.

Long considered "children's entertainment" by audiences and popular media, Hollywood animation has received little serious attention. Eric Smoodin's Animating Culture  is the first and only book to thoroughly analyze the animated short film. 

Usually running about seven or eight minutes, cartoons were made by major Hollywood studios––such as MGM, Warner Bros., and Disney––and shown at movie theaters along with a newsreel and a feature-length film. Smoodin explores animated shorta and the system that mass-produced them. How were cartoons exhibited in theaters? How did they tell their stories? Who did they tell them to? What did they say about race, class, and gender? How were cartoons related to the feature films they accompanied on the evening's bill of fare?  What were the social functions of cartoon stars like Donald Duck and Minnie Mouse?

Smoodin argues that cartoons appealed to a wide audience––not just children––and did indeed contribute to public debate about political matters. He examines issues often ignored in discussions of animated film––issues such as social control in the U.S. army's "Private Snafu" cartoons, and sexuality and race in the "sites" of Betty Boop's body and the cartoon harem. Smoodin's analysis of the multiple discourses embedded in a variety of cartoons reveals the complex and sometimes contradictory ways that animation dealt with class relations, labor, imperialism, and censorship. His discussion of Disney and the Disney Studio's close ties with the U.S. government forces us to rethink the place of the cartoon in political and cultural life. Smoodin reveals the complex relationship between cartoons and the Hollywood studio system, and between cartoons and their audiences.