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eBook Bringing Up Oscar: The Story of the Men and Women Who Founded the Academy ePub

eBook Bringing Up Oscar: The Story of the Men and Women Who Founded the Academy ePub

by Debra Ann Pawlak

  • ISBN: 1605981370
  • Category: Movies
  • Subcategory: Entertainment
  • Author: Debra Ann Pawlak
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Pegasus Books; First Edition edition (January 15, 2011)
  • Pages: 336
  • ePub book: 1787 kb
  • Fb2 book: 1698 kb
  • Other: azw docx lrf lit
  • Rating: 4.9
  • Votes: 964

Description

Includes bibliographical references (p. 349-360).

Includes bibliographical references (p. Presents the story of the thirty-six motion picture pioneers, including Cecil B. DeMille and Mary Pickford, who joined together to found the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences and organized the annual Academy Awards.

Pawlak traces the lives of the 36 key figures in the cinema community who launched the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences in 1927, the same year talkies arrived with The Jazz Singer. By skillfully weaving such highlights of Hollywood history throughout this Tinseltown tapestry, Pawlak succeeds in recreating that colorful era when flickers turned into features and silents converted to sound.

Who Founded the Academy. The Academy is the League of Nations of the Motion Picture Industry. It is our open forum where all branches can meet and discuss constructive solutions to problems with which each is confronted

Who Founded the Academy. It is our open forum where all branches can meet and discuss constructive solutions to problems with which each is confronted. In the past, we have never been able to get together on a common ground and in making this possible the Academy has conferred a great service.

Bringing Up Oscar book. Very detailed history of Hollywood from the perspective of the men and women who made it happen. Great bios as well as when and where's. Repeated stories detracted a bit from the flow, but still enjoy the in depth history. Jun 24, 2015 Russell Sanders rated it it was ok.

Pawlak tells us where they all came from and where they all wound up and even how they died.

Full recovery of all data can take up to 2 weeks! So we came to the decision at this time to double the download limits for all users until the problem is completely resolved. Thanks for your understanding! Progress: 9. 5% restored. Главная Bringing Up Oscar: The Story of the Men and Women Who Founded the Academy. Bringing Up Oscar: The Story of the Men and Women Who Founded the Academy.

In her book "Bringing Up Oscar, the Men and Women who Founded the Academy" Pawlak writes about Hollywood in the early days was a dusty small town with the only attractions being crops and livestock where pepper trees lined the streets

In her book "Bringing Up Oscar, the Men and Women who Founded the Academy" Pawlak writes about Hollywood in the early days was a dusty small town with the only attractions being crops and livestock where pepper trees lined the streets. At the time the main street of Hollywood was Prospect Avenue and it had some Victorian-type homes that wealthy people had built so they could spend the winters in the mild climate of California. It would later be named Hollywood Blvd.

The untold story of the innovative pioneers who helped make movies the preeminent art form of the twentieth .

The untold story of the innovative pioneers who helped make movies the preeminent art form of the twentieth century  . Who were these movers and shakers who would change movies forever? And what about Oscar, their famous son? He is fast approaching his hundredth birthday and is still the undisputed king of Hollywood.

Bringing Up Oscar: The Story of the Men and Women Who Founded the Academy. Welcome to Literature Tube Archieve The free online library containing 450000+ books. Read books for free from anywhere and from any device. Listen to books in audio format instead of reading.

The untold story of the innovative pioneers who helped make movies the preeminent art form of the twentieth century by founding the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences.

The founders of the now infamous Academy were a motley crew as individuals, but when they first converged in Hollywood, then just a small town with dirt roads, sparks flew and fueled a common dream: to bring artistic validity to their beloved new medium. Today, movies are so ingrained in our culture it is hard to imagine a time when former cowpunchers, prospectors, vaudevillians, even junk dealers made up the rules as they went along. Prohibition and the Great Depression were keeping everyone on edge, and the business was rife with murders and drug scandals. Something had to happen. And so on January 11th, 1927, thirty-six members of Hollywood's elite and not-so-elite came together at the behest of MGM chief Louis B. Mayer. From Cecil B. DeMille to Mary Pickford, Harry M. Warner, who owned a bike shop before launching the revolutionary “talkie” The Jazz Singer, even Joseph M. Schenck, freed from jail just in time to discover Marilyn Monroe―each guest was more colorful than the last. Although they didn’t know it yet, these thirty-six achievers and dreamers gave birth to a golden child. Who were these movers and shakers who would change movies forever? And what about Oscar, their famous son? He is fast approaching his 100th birthday, and is still the undisputed king of Hollywood. Yet with such dynamic parents, what else could we expect? 12 black-and-white photographs

Comments

Charyoll Charyoll
Since I’m a movie freak and have read many, many accounts of Hollywood and its beginnings, when I saw Debra Ann Pawlak’s Bringing Up Oscar: The Story of the Men and Women Who Founded the Academy, I thought, “Wow! I’ve never read an in-depth look at the Motion Picture Academy, formally known as The Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences. I expected to find out just what this institution does in addition to giving out those shiny little men. But since I can read the title, I knew the book would focus more on the people who had the idea for the academy. And oh—it does. The first half of the book details each of the producers, writers, actors, actresses, techies, and one theater owner who thought up this institution. I can save you time: almost each and every one of them were dirt poor, hard-scrabble immigrants who decided working in the fledgling industry would be a good thing, started in the east, and eventually migrated west because it was warmer, sunnier, and free of the restrictions placed upon the new industry by its inventor Thomas Edison. And not only is this story repeated in slight variations, but you will find out the birth dates and birth places of each, including any siblings they may have had. Then suddenly, towards the middle, they meet and have this idea. The academy comes to fruition. Then the book becomes less tedious, as each one of them is dealt with again, this time describing their deaths (mostly heart attacks.) What career facts are told in this section are, for the most part, repeats of myriad facts told in the first section. Get the idea? This is a very repetitious book. Great for high schoolers doing research on the film industry; not so great for those of us who just want to enjoy reading about early Hollywood. The repetition, from the endless dates given to the re-telling of life facts, gets to be mighty tedious. And that explanation of what the academy does? Almost non-existent. In the final chapter, a few sentences intrigued me and I thought, “Finally, the truth is revealed.” I turned the page, eagerly anticipating more explanation, and—the book was finished! Just a few anecdotes about the awards, the acceptance speeches, the outreach programs of the academy—anything really—could have spiced this up a bit. Instead, it is an endless drone of “Joe Schmo was born in Latvia in 1888, came to America with his parents, grew up with his four brothers and two sisters (born 1899, 1900, etc.) He started out selling potatoes but then gravitated toward the new flicker industry. He changed his name to Alexander Star and began the legendary film company Star Studios.” You get the idea? How many times do we need to be told that Samuel Goldfish changed his name to Samuel Goldwyn? Pawlak, apparently, think five or more times are needed for us to remember. It could have been a great book; instead, it’s one for the research shelves.
Timberahue Timberahue
I'm a Hollywood buff of sorts. I love reading about the Golden Age of Hollywood and the stars that populated Hollywood's greatest years (by this I mean the 30s and 40s). But this book takes us back to the origins of all that and does it brilliantly. The wealth of anecdote surprises. I feel when reading it as if I'm being transported to an age of innovation unmatched in mordern times. Granted, I've not read the book sequentially but enjoyed dipping here and there. Maybe it's meant to be read that way as its strength, to my mind, is incident and personality. To everyone who stays up waaay past their bedtime to take in the whole of Oscar Night I say: Kudos to the author. Let's hear more!
Naril Naril
Fascinating reading!!! This compelling story of early Hollywood, and the men and women involved in acting, filming, and producing the first movies, brings history to life! I learned about so much behind the scenes history in the movie industry. And I met and got acquainted with the influential people I had only heard about.

Ms. Pawlak has a comfortable, conversational, down to earth style of writing. The reader feels like the author is sitting with her in a cozy room, sharing the story over a steaming cup of coffee. :)

Her passion for this topic shines through! If you enjoy movies, this is a must read!
Malahelm Malahelm
Love this book with all the history of Oscar!
Winotterin Winotterin
Full of information,but a very dull writing style. I wasn't looking for a geneology of the Academy! However,I did learn a lot about very early movieland!
The Sphinx of Driz The Sphinx of Driz
What the author has done is long overdue. Only by understanding who the founding fathers of the Academy were - only by understanding who the men and women were as people, their motivations, their family history, their roots - can we understand the preeminent art form of the 20th century... an art form that has changed everything in our lives, whether we like it or not. The academy, the Oscars, are perhaps the hook to this book, but what is more important is getting to know the real people, the real ambition and passion of the people who made the industry. Damn fine book!
And there's a great review here too, from UCLA film school: [...]
Dorintrius Dorintrius
Oscar is the TOP Hollywood movie award.As a film buff,I found this book fascinating.It is hard to believe that moviedom is just about 100 years old.I enjoyed reading about the history of the Oscars.