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eBook Inside Joss' Dollhouse: From Alpha to Rossum ePub

eBook Inside Joss' Dollhouse: From Alpha to Rossum ePub

by Jane Espenson

  • ISBN: 1935251988
  • Category: Television
  • Subcategory: Entertainment
  • Author: Jane Espenson
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Smart Pop (October 12, 2010)
  • Pages: 224
  • ePub book: 1105 kb
  • Fb2 book: 1381 kb
  • Other: mobi lit lrf azw
  • Rating: 4.3
  • Votes: 139

Description

Though Joss Whedon’s television show Dollhouse ended in January 2010 after its second season.

Though Joss Whedon’s television show Dollhouse ended in January 2010 after its second season. Thematically, the show primarily dealt with matters of identity, or the "soul," and that the book would deal with the shifting identities of composite characters like Echo and Alpha is to be expected. But in examining the twisty-turny arcs of Adelle and Topher, and the hidden nature of Boyd, the essays make one realize that everyone's identities are fluid.

Inside Joss' Dollhouse book. Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read. Start by marking Inside Joss' Dollhouse: From Alpha to Rossum as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read.

Inside Joss' Dollhouse is a fitting tribute to this complex, engaging show. The anthology’s 18 sometimes funny, always insightful pieces cover Dollhouse from anticipated start to explosive finish.

Inside Joss' Dollhouse is a fitting tribute to this complex, engaging show

Inside Joss' Dollhouse is a fitting tribute to this complex, engaging show. The anthology's 18 sometimes funny, always insightful pieces cover Dollhouse from anticipated start to explosive finish.

Inside Joss' Dollhouse. Though Joss Whedon’s television show Dollhouse ended in January 2010 after its second season, its small but devoted cult following is still reeling from not only from its mind-blowing plot twists but also its challenging, dystopic look at the ethics of new technology. Inside Joss' Dollhouse is a fitting tribute to this complex, engaging show.

America's Doll House : The Miniature World of Faith Bradford. Saved in: Bibliographic Details. Inside Joss' Dollhouse : From Alpha to Rossum. Ethnicity and Englishness : Personal Identities in a Minority Community. by: Cullingford, Cedric.

Inside Joss' Dollhouse : From Alpha to Rossum Though Joss Whedon's television show Dollhouse ended in January 2010 .

Inside Joss' Dollhouse : From Alpha to Rossum. Though Joss Whedon's television show Dollhouse ended in January 2010 after its second season, its small but devoted cult following is still reeling from not only from its mind-blowing plot twists but also its challenging, dystopic look at the ethics of new technology.

Jane Espenson was a consulting producer and writer on Dollhouse. She is best known for her previous work on Buffy the Vampire Slayer and Battlestar Galactica. Her first experimenting with writing for TV was at age 13, when she took a stab at writing an episode of M A S H. She attended college at UC Berkeley, studying linguistics as an undergrad and graduate student. While in grad school, she submitted spec episodes to Star Trek: The Next Generation.

Though Joss Whedon’s television show Dollhouse ended in January 2010 after its second season, its small but devoted cult following is still reeling from not only from its mind-blowing plot twists but also its challenging, dystopic look at the ethics of new technology. Inside Joss' Dollhouse is a fitting tribute to this complex, engaging show. The anthology’s 18 sometimes funny, always insightful pieces cover Dollhouse from anticipated start to explosive finish. Drawn from an international contest judged by fan favorite Whedon screenwriter Jane Espenson, its essays get right to heart of what Dollhouse viewers loved most about the show. Espenson also acts as the book’s editor, offering context and extra insight on its topics and the show—a role she played in previous anthologies Finding Serenity and Serenity Found, also on Joss Whedon creations. From programmer Topher’s amorality to the accuracy of the show’s neurobiology, Inside Joss' Dollhouse brings Dollhouse back to life with a depth sure to satisfy its many still-mourning fans.

Comments

Deorro Deorro
Dollhouse premiered in February 2009 and went off the air in January 2010. As far as Joss Whedon shows go, it's not the shortest-lived--Firefly lasted only three months--but at times it felt like the most incomplete. Network tampering harmed the show creatively more than it did Firefly, and its cancellation just as it was finally delivering on its potential was devastating. But Joss Whedon never leaves his stories unfinished, and what little of Dollhouse we had proves surprisingly fertile ground for analysis in Inside Joss' Dollhouse.

The essays in this collection, edited by longtime Whedon writer/geek goddess Jane Espenson, discuss the show's characters, themes, and structure in often enlightening fashion. Thematically, the show primarily dealt with matters of identity, or the "soul," and that the book would deal with the shifting identities of composite characters like Echo and Alpha is to be expected. But in examining the twisty-turny arcs of Adelle and Topher, and the hidden nature of Boyd, the essays make one realize that everyone's identities are fluid.

Before it earned its praise, Dollhouse had to deal with a heavy level of scrutiny and criticism, and remains the most underrated Whedon endeavor. With time and distance, though, I think that Dollhouse will be regarded as the fascinating, compelling science fiction story it is. This book is a necessary first step in its re-evaluation.
Mmsa Mmsa
I found this book to be an interesting, and even at times insightful, read. The essays chosen are well-written and very in-depth as far as each look into Dollhouse. Reading the opinions of others on a show that I enjoy, and have my own thoughts on as well, was fascinating; even going so far as to at times make me see things that perhaps I did not before or marvel at the fact that I wasn't alone in some of my own views. The essays that Jane Espenson decided on for this novel were chosen well, and that makes me wonder more about those essays that didn't make the cut.
Fordrellador Fordrellador
Dollhouse ended way too soon. There are so many meta and micro stories within the show that have not been told that it would be ideal if Dollhouse was eventually continued on in film form, much as Star Trek found new life through feature films. I absolutely loved this series, and loved thee essays on the philosophical themes presented.
Jozrone Jozrone
Loved it.
Kikora Kikora
Jane Espenson, editor for this essay collection, is a princess within the Whedonverse and has contributed mightily to all of Joss's key ventures, from Buffy the Vampire Slayer - The Complete Series (Seasons 1-7) to Firefly - The Complete Series, and has worked on companion books similar to "Inside Joss Dollhouse" for the Smart Pop series. I think her work on Finding Serenity: Anti-heroes, Lost Shepherds And Space Hookers In Joss Whedon's Firefly (Smart Pop Series) is especially commendable.

"Inside," less so. It's not a bad book, and some of the essays are appropriately provocative, but the overall sense I was left with is that the work was hurried, unpolished, even unfinished. That there were good ideas here that lacked the maturity of ripe development. But on further thought, that state of affairs seems to describe the series (Dollhouse: Season One and Dollhouse: The Complete Second Season) the essays are about as well. Dollhouse didn't catch fire until well into the first season, faltered a little at the beginning of the second season, and then became something truly compelling. It accomplished this by becoming more like some of Whedon's previous works in which a tightly allied group of misfits form a sort of family to take on the Big Bad, the Powers That Be, or the Reavers. It's a formula that works very well for Whedon, mostly because it never feels like a formula. The greatest freshness he achieves, the greatest character-driven plot momentum, comes out of those relationships among the heroic band, and it never gets tired.

But in the case of "Dollhouse," it did get hurried. Knowing that he only had one more season (at most) to finish his arc and complete some sense of story on "Dollhouse," all elements were rushed, double-crosses came at blinding speed, revelations happened at a breathtaking space, and the apocalypse itself was distilled to a barely credible essence. Firefly, with only a handful of TV episodes (and the film Serenity to bring a little closure to the arc) never felt hurried as Dollhouse did, because its cancellation came before a quick ending could be produced.

Because so much in terms of theme development, Whedon's trademark philosophical depth, character development, and storyline complexity were sacrificed on an altar of closure, the essays in this book will naturally lack the depth of the books on more fully-realized series. And this lack of depth is also reflected in the sort of people who have written the essays. This is not the group of pundits, scholars, philosophers and psychologists who have weighed in on other Whedon works, but a more rag-tag group of intelligent but less experienced writers. With a less solid foundation from which to work, some essays pick up a speculative wobble and come near toppling into nonsense.

Yet I'm glad to have read the book. Whedon is one of few pop culture producers who actually rewards deeper contemplation. He seeks first to engage and entertain, and usually succeeds spectacularly. But beyond entertainment, he has a vision of humanity that many of us find compelling. In the face of tragedy and absurdity, we can be heroes if we are loyal, choose good allies, and maintain a sense of purpose. This comes through even in the truncated Dollhouse series, and receives some appropriate celebration in "Inside Joss' Dollhouse."
Neol Neol
Dollhouse, for all of its divisiveness among fans, was a complex and philosophically challenging show. It had the feel of the best sci-fi (Asimov comes to mind) in the way that it used its speculative fiction premise less as a geeky adventure and more as a vehicle for exploring humanity.

The depth of the characterization and writing on Dollhouse renders this book of essays uniquely rewarding. Almost none of this feels like a high school English paper, grasping at straws to prove some paper-thin thesis. The show is deep enough that each essayist is able to sink their teeth into the material without overreaching or making weak conclusions. The character studies (one essay focuses on Topher's moral development, and another analyzes the way Boyd is viewed by those around him) are especially good, shedding new light on these complex characters.

This book kept me interested, and made me want to re-watch the series from the start so I could see it with fresh eyes.