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eBook Living with the Devil: A Meditation on Good and Evil ePub

eBook Living with the Devil: A Meditation on Good and Evil ePub

by Stephen Batchelor

  • ISBN: 1573222763
  • Category: Alternative Medicine
  • Subcategory: Fitness and Nutrition
  • Author: Stephen Batchelor
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Riverhead Books (June 3, 2004)
  • Pages: 208
  • ePub book: 1941 kb
  • Fb2 book: 1821 kb
  • Other: lit rtf doc azw
  • Rating: 4.7
  • Votes: 852

Description

Stephen Batchelor's seminal work on humanity's struggle between good and evil In the national bestseller Living with . Then you can start reading Kindle books on your smartphone, tablet, or computer - no Kindle device required.

Stephen Batchelor's seminal work on humanity's struggle between good and evil In the national bestseller Living with the Devil. To get the free app, enter your mobile phone number.

Living with the Devil book. 40,000 first printing.

Stephen Batchelor's seminal work on humanity's struggle between good and evil In the national bestseller Living with the Devil, Batchelor traces the trajectory from the words of the Buddha and Christ, through the writings of Shantideva, Milton, and Pascal, to the poetry of Baudelaire.

Stephen Batchelor's seminal work on humanity's struggle between good and evil In the national bestseller Living with the Devil, Batchelor traces the trajectory from the words of the Buddha and Christ, through the writings of Shantideva, Milton, and Pascal, to the poetry of Baudelaire, the fiction of Kafka, and the findings of modern physics and evolutionary biology to examine who we really are, and to rest in the uncertainty that we may never know.

Living with the Devil is Stephen Batchelor's work on humankind's greatest struggle - to become good

Living with the Devil is Stephen Batchelor's work on humankind's greatest struggle - to become good. Batchelor traces the trajectory - from the words of the Buddha and Christ, through the writings at Shantideva, Milton, and Pascal, to the poetry of Baudelaire and the fiction of Kafka - of impediments that keep us from doing what's in our own and others' best interests

He is a noted proponent of agnostic or secular Buddhism

He is a noted proponent of agnostic or secular Buddhism. Batchelor was born in Dundee, Scotland in 1953. When he was three, his family relocated briefly to Toronto, Ontario, Canada, where his parents separated.

By Stephen Batchelor. New York: Riverhead Books (Penguin Imprint). Pp. 224. ISBN 1573222763. For Batchelor this is not what the fight against the Devil requires. Nirvana is found not by forsaking the world, but by probing its dark and fleshy depths

By Stephen Batchelor. Nirvana is found not by forsaking the world, but by probing its dark and fleshy depths. 104) For Batchelor, as for two of his philosophical interlocutors, Pascal and Montaigne, Mara cannot be overcome simply by removing oneself from situations one finds disturbing.

Stephen Batchelor (author). Please provide me with your latest book news, views and details of Waterstones’ special offers. Paperback 240 Pages, Published: 16/06/2005.

Also by stephen batchelor. Alone with Others: An Existential Approach to Buddhism. Verses from the Center: A Buddhist Vision of the Sublime

Also by stephen batchelor. The Faith to Doubt: Glimpses of Buddhist Uncertainty. Verses from the Center: A Buddhist Vision of the Sublime. There are not only one hundred, or five hundred, but far more men and women lay followers, my disciples, clothed in white, enjoying sensual pleasures, who carry out my instruction, respond to my advice, have gone beyond doubt, become free from perplexity, gained intrepidity and become independent of others in my teaching.

Stephen Batchelor once again offers us the rare gifts of his probing intellect, elegant prose, and provocative spiritual .

Stephen Batchelor once again offers us the rare gifts of his probing intellect, elegant prose, and provocative spiritual insights. With grace and refinement, he opens the doors of understanding we might not even have known were closed. This book is an illuminating read. Joseph Goldstein, author of. One Dharma: The Emerging Western Buddhism. Published by the Penguin Group.

A personal meditation by the best-selling Buddhist philosopher considers the existence of evil in the world, drawing on western and Buddhist literature to profile the devil as a deceptive or distracting obstacle to true goodness and humility. 40,000 first printing.

Comments

Уou ll never walk alone Уou ll never walk alone
Have you been practicing dhamma only to find yourself stuck in a rut, aware that your seemingly heroic efforts are leading you in circles? For me, the concept of Emptiness was eluding me. My first mistake was in capitalizing the word whenever I thought about it, and my second was in believing it to be a concept in its own right. Both these mistakes became evident to me as I read through this book. Stephen Batchelor describes it with the following analogy: each time you are able to walk freely on a path without obstruction, you owe your freedom to the absence of undergrowth and shrubbery; something has been cleared out of the way; the path does not exist in isolation. Notice that emptying is an act and not a metaphysical aspect of nature. His book is full of these clarifications that an intermediate student of dhamma would take ages to discover for himself. The unexpected gems in this book is what makes it so worthwhile. Sometimes one sentence is enough for you to make headway and break through your old barriers.

As for the book, the thesis is simple: Without intention to harm, there can be no intention to do good. We do not become better than our base natures but learn to live with our selfish thoughts and illusions of self-importance . The most important lesson I took from this book is that my lofty goal of trying to be Buddha-like was actually undermining my efforts. The best way to describe it would be with an absurd analogy. Imagine your bladder is full and you've spent the last hour looking for a vacant bathroom. My mistake was to think I had to reach a state that transcended this whirl of internal commotion. The more suitable path was so close to me that I missed it. Once you realize that the state you are grasping at is precisely the ORDINARY state you found yourself in before you imbibed the excess liquid, you become instantly equanimous. The contingency of your whole life is revealed and worrying becomes extraneous.
Burisi Burisi
I ordered this book because I have been a student of both Eastern and Western views on Good and Evil, both in practical and philosophical terms. I gave the book four stars because I don't think Batchelor goes deeply enough into "the Devil" in the title. The Problem of Evil is an idea that plagues every society, and there is not much written about it from a Buddhist perspective.

Don't get me wrong; he has a helpful (especially because non-theistic) hypothesis. He has made a contribution to the thinking on this vast topic.

The best thing about this book is the prose. As always, Batchelor writes poetically, almost lyrically. It is a pleasure to read. Some might find it a book to be savored, and lingered over, and some might find, as I did, that it can be read and enjoyed in brief snatches.

Batchelor does a wonderful job of putting Buddhist thought into understandable language, and of making the ancient texts relevant to modern experience. For practitioners of Buddhism, like myself, this book can enhance one's understanding of any number of elements of Buddhism (e.g., meditation on the breath, having a body, human relationships, the idea of engaged Buddhism). I would imagine that for non-Buddhists, besides being exposed to a clear exposition on basic Buddhist philosophy, this book demonstrates how Western and Buddhist thinkers concur on the problem of evil in important ways.
Marirne Marirne
Helpful!
Eigeni Eigeni
This book is an interesting and intelligent approach to the dualistic struggle of Good and Evil that is rooted deeply in the human character. Most of the expositions are Buddhist, but parallels in literature and in other religions are also considered with cultural poise and maturity. (Although the author used to be a monk in the Tibetan and Zen traditions, the Pali Nikaya is the predominant source of his quotations.) Many subtle points in Buddhist philosophy and meditation practice are made surprisingly accessible in lucid and poetic prose. If you have read "Verses from the Center: A Buddhist Vision of the Sublime," you will find that the author's wonderful explanations of "contingency," "emptiness" and "path" are reintroduced in this book. Yet, Buddhism goes beyond the moral connotations of Evil and Good: the meditator looks directly at Concept and Reality, at Fabrication and Truth. Freedom from suffering is ultimately freedom from all fixations, or "absence of resistance" as the author aptly puts it.
This book could serve as a better introduction to Buddhism than most books that are so dry and doctrinal they put you to sleep. If you are a Buddhist scholar or meditation practitioner, read it too, as it may give you a few fresh perspectives (or take away some of your beloved opinions). Enjoy the book, and its reminder: There is no Buddha without Mara; there is no Nirvana without Samsara.