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eBook Dancing in the Rain: Stories of Exceptional Progress by Parents of Children with Special Needs ePub

eBook Dancing in the Rain: Stories of Exceptional Progress by Parents of Children with Special Needs ePub

by Annabel Stehli

  • ISBN: 0825305349
  • Category: Childrens Health
  • Subcategory: Fitness and Nutrition
  • Author: Annabel Stehli
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Georgiana Publishing (January 1, 2010)
  • Pages: 303
  • ePub book: 1512 kb
  • Fb2 book: 1923 kb
  • Other: rtf docx mobi lit
  • Rating: 4.8
  • Votes: 488

Description

Dancing in the Rain book.

Dancing in the Rain book.

Dancing in the Rain: Stories of Exceptional Progress by Parents of Children with Special Needs. The Sound Of A Miracle: The Inspiring True Story of A Mother's Fight to Free Her Child from Autism. I would recommend this book and Stehli's two anthologies of parents' stories: Dancing in the Rain and Sound of Falling Snow as must-reads for parents of autistic, dyslexic, bipolar, Tourette's, epileptic, schizophrenic, or otherwise mentally disturbed children. Laurna Tallman, author and publisher, Marmora, Ontario, Canada. has the ability to walk through her pages as a real person so that the reader reacts with her, thinks with her, and certainly feels with her. She has the gift of writing. - Norman Vincent Peale.

Dancing in the Rain is a guide to the world of learning disbilities, developmental delay and autism. It would have made all the difference, says Annabel Stehli.

Dancing in the Rain : Stories of Exceptional Progress by Parents of Children with Special Needs. Dancing in the Rain is a guide to the world of learning disbilities, developmental delay and autism.

Stories of Exceptional Progress by Parents of Children With Special Needs. Published November 1995 by Georgian Institute.

Doubleday 1997 1 Copy Dancing in the Rain: Stories of Exceptional Progress by parents of Children with Special Needs. The Georgiana Or. Wesrtport, Ct 1995 1 Copy Disability Etiquette: Tips on Interacting With People With Dissabilities Eastern Paralyzed Veterans Assoc. bullying meanness & stormy relationships, Fred Frankel, P. 1996 1 Copy Hope for the Families: New Direction for Parents of Persons with Retardation or Other Disabilities Robert Perske & Martha Perske Abingdon Press Nashville TN, 1981 1 Copy Invisible No More: A Photographic Chrnical of the Lives of People with Intellectual Disabilities.

Annabel Stehli is the author of the celebrated The Sound of a Miracle .

Annabel Stehli is the author of the celebrated The Sound of a Miracle, the story of her own daughter, Georgiana's experience with autism and her recovery. As a result of that book, Annabel received letters from hundreds of parents who were facing similar questions with their own children. As a result, Annabel compiled many of their stories in Dancing in the Rain which has given hope to thousands who have experienced autism in their own families.

Dancing in the Rain Stories of Exceptional Progress by Parents of Children with Special Needs, Annabel Stehli, Georgiana Publishing. Alone Italy Trips Places To Travel Alone In The Us Wanderlust. Children's Clinic Pediatrics Kids Learning Teaching Kids Classroom Healthy Kids School Videos Healthy Children. 7 Ways to Keep Kids Healthy During the School Year. Children's Clinic Jonesboro AR. What others are saying. An approach to acting that enables performers to explore different levels of tension.

Dancing in the Rain is a guide to the world of learning disbilities, developmental delay and autism. An inspiring and riveting selection of stories, they are written with candor and intelligence by the parents of children with special needs and edited by Annabel Stehli, author of The Sound of a Miracle (Avon). Focusing on attention deficit disorder, dyslexia, hyperlexia, pervasive developmental delay, communication delay, central auditory processing disorder, fetal alcohol syndrome and autism, here are strategies that worked in twenty-two cases. How I wish a book like this had been available when my daughter was first diagnosed. It would have made all the difference, says Annabel Stehli.

Comments

Fek Fek
Parents are the ones who know their child(ren) best. Any information that people can acquire to help children facing special needs is welcomed and appreciated. This book is such a teaching tool. Sadly, many lay persons' knowledge of autism has been confined to the cliche character of "Rain Man." Savantism applies to roughly less than 10% of the autistic population and sadly, "Rain Man" has become a negative stereotype for people with autism.

This is one of the most heartwarming, uplifting litany of successes I have had the good fortune and pleasure to read. Ms. Stehli, whose own daughter, Georgiana was labeled "autistic" is a shining beacon of success. Now married and a mother, Georgiana was nonverbal until the age of four despite having mastered all other milestones within normal age limits. She had hyper acute hearing and literally had to learn how to synthesize her senory modes. Fluent in six languages, Georgiana is an advocate of Auditory Integration Therapy (AIT) and is also an author on the subject.

AIT is a science that is targets auditory processing challenges and, from all accounts, aims to work with clients to gradually integrate what they hear into manageable units; e.g., individual words and/or sounds at one time. AIT also helps people concentrate without being distracted by other sensory modes. A Dr. Berard has made AIT a recognized science and this book, "Dancing in the Rain" brings his work to the lay reader. This book is truly a song to the soul, a cheer to the conscience and a voice of encouragement. This book is the voice of hope for many.

Autism and related neurological disorders such as Aspergers and PDD are fully explained in Ms. Stehli's works. Unfortunately for many, "autism" and "schizophrenia" have been used as "waste basket" or catch-all labels for persons who fit no defined criteria. One costly misperception that persisted until recent years was that autism is a mental illness, which it most emphatically is not. This book helps to undermine labels and focus on integrating people with a myriad of behaviorial as well as neurological challenges back into the mainstream.

Another highly damning and judgmental perjorative is the word "perseverate" in any tense. It is a truly dreadful word. While many professionals, parents included might find it a helpful shorthand, it is still an extremely negative, highly charged and destructive word that has hurt many. The terms "repetitive verbalizations/behaviors" and "special interests" are preferable as they speak to tolerance.

Based on Dr. Berard's writings, autism and its related behaviors are often a curious response to an overload of sensory input. Georgiana describes AIT as literally saving her life and the stories chronicled in this book make a very strong case for AIT indeed. In reading Dr. Berard's writings, one can see that his findings certainly do appear valid; other persons once thought of as autistic such as Raun Kaufman ("Son-Rise") seem to share the challenge of sorting out sensory input.

I feel this book is quite helpful and I cannot recommend it highly enough.
Glei Glei
The whole package is terrific, the subject and the writing: all top notch.

Read it!
Steamy Ibis Steamy Ibis
Parents are the ones who know their child(ren) best. Any information that people can acquire to help children facing special needs is welcomed and appreciated. This book is such a teaching tool. It helps dispel the tiresome cliche of "Rain Man." Sadly, many of the personal accounts show that many people's working knowledge of autism was confined to that fictional character with savant abilities. Savantism applies to roughly less than 10% of the autistic population and has ironically become a stereotype for people with autism. This book helps move beyond "Rain Man," which does not apply to most people on the autism/Asperger's spectrum.

This is one of the most heartwarming, uplifting litany of successes I have had the good fortune and pleasure to read. Ms. Stehli, whose own daughter, Georgiana was labeled "autistic" is a shining beacon of success. Now married and a mother, Georgiana was nonverbal until the age of four despite having mastered all other milestones within normal age limits. She had hyper acute hearing and literally had to learn how to synthesize her senory modes. Fluent in six languages, Georgiana is an advocate of Auditory Integration Therapy (AIT) and is also an author on the subject. Her book, "Overcoming Autism" is currently available on her web site. It is one of the best books to date on the subject of autism.

AIT is a science that is targets auditory processing challenges and, from all accounts, aims to work with clients to gradually integrate what they hear into manageable units; e.g., individual words and/or sounds at one time. AIT also helps people concentrate without being distracted by other sensory modes. A Dr. Berard has made AIT a recognized science and this book, "Dancing in the Rain" brings his work to the lay reader. This book is truly a song to the soul, a cheer to the conscience and a voice of encouragement. This book is the voice of hope for many.

Autism and related neurological disorders such as Aspergers and PDD are fully explained in Ms. Stehli's works. Unfortunately for many, "autism" and "schizophrenia" have been used as "waste basket" or catch-all labels for persons who fit no defined criteria. One costly misperception that persisted until recent years was that autism is a mental illness, which it most emphatically is not.

Another highly damning and judgmental perjorative is the word "perseverate" in any tense. While many professionals, parents included might find it to be a helpful shorthand, it is truly a negative and destructive word that has hurt many. The terms "repetitive verbalizations and/or behaviors" and "special interests" are preferable as they speak to tolerance. This book helps to undermine labels and focus on integrating people with a myriad of behaviorial as well as neurological challenges back into the mainstream.

Based on Dr. Berard's writings, autism and its related behaviors are often a curious response to an overload of sensory input. Georgiana describes AIT as literally saving her life and the stories chronicled in this book make a very strong case for AIT indeed. In reading Dr. Berard's writings, one can see that his findings certainly do appear valid; other persons once thought of as autistic such as Raun Kaufman ("Son-Rise") seem to share the challenge of sorting out sensory input.

I feel this book is quite helpful and I cannot recommend it highly enough.
Faezahn Faezahn
I am the mother who wrote the essay "James," and although it is full of my untutored, unprofessional opinions, I have been contacted by mothers from all over the world who seek my advice. The reviewer from Britain can take the same tired, old stance that we shouldn't try everything that comes around because some of it might not work, but if we didn't try everything, then our child may have missed out on something that is later scientifically proven to work. In the world of autism, furthermore, a parent is told that the situation is essentially hopeless. (At least, that is what my generation was told.) "Listen to us," the traditional experts command, then they say, "Oh by the way, your child's condi- tion is hopeless, and we have nothing to offer but manage- ment." Given that they have nothing to offer, why listen to them? James is now 12 and the coauthor of his own book--THE SELF-HELP GUIDE FOR SPECIAL KIDS AND THEIR PARENTS. It is my believe that none of his achievements in speaking and writing would have been possible without AIT.