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eBook The Oedipus Complex: A Philosophical Study ePub

eBook The Oedipus Complex: A Philosophical Study ePub

by Seymour Keitlen

  • ISBN: 1589395107
  • Category: Psychology and Counseling
  • Subcategory: Fitness and Nutrition
  • Author: Seymour Keitlen
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Virtualbookworm.com Publishing (November 17, 2003)
  • Pages: 80
  • ePub book: 1622 kb
  • Fb2 book: 1546 kb
  • Other: doc lrf lit rtf
  • Rating: 4.7
  • Votes: 556

Description

The Oedipus Complex : A Philosophical Study. This small text is a study of the Oedipus Complex in the work of Sigmund Freud, creator of psychoanalysis

The Oedipus Complex : A Philosophical Study. This small text is a study of the Oedipus Complex in the work of Sigmund Freud, creator of psychoanalysis. The Oedipus Complex is a theory about the mental life of the child.

The Oedipus Complex book. Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read. Start by marking The Oedipus Complex: A Philosophical Study as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read.

The oedipus complex: a philosophical study. This book argues that hesitation as an artistic and spectatorial strategy connects various screen media texts produced in post-war Romania. Texas: Virtualbookworm. The chapters draw a historical connection between films made during the state socialist decades, televised broadcasts of the 1989 Romanian revolution, and films of the new Romanian cinema. The book explores how the critical attitude of new Romanian cinema.

The Oedipus Complex: A Philosophical Study by Seymour Keitlen. How does this next cartoon work? What is the correct literary term that is demonstrated here that makes the joke funny?)

The Oedipus complex (also spelled Œdipus complex) is a concept of psychoanalytic theory.

The Oedipus complex (also spelled Œdipus complex) is a concept of psychoanalytic theory. Sigmund Freud introduced the concept in his Interpretation of Dreams (1899) and coined the expression in his A Special Type of Choice of Object made by Men (1910). The positive Oedipus complex refers to a child's unconscious sexual desire for the opposite-sex parent and hatred for the same-sex parent

The Oedipus Complex develops during the Phallic stage in Freud’s psychosexual stages, which takes place . Freud also specified an Oedipus Complex for little girls, called the Electra Complex, a reference to another Greek mythological figure.

The Oedipus Complex develops during the Phallic stage in Freud’s psychosexual stages, which takes place between the ages of 3 and 5. At that time, a boy starts to unconsciously desire his mother. However, he soon learns he can’t act on his desires. At the same time, he notices his father receives the affection from his mother that he covets, causing jealousy and rivalry. The Electra Complex begins when the girl realizes she lacks a penis. She blames her mother, developing resentment towards her as well as penis envy.

Philosophical Studies provides a periodical dedicated to work in analytic philosophy. The journal is devoted to the publication of papers in exclusively analytic philosophy, and welcomes papers applying formal techniques to philosophical problems. The principal aim is to publish articles that are models of clarity and precision in dealing with significant philosophical issues. The readers of the journal will be kept abreast of the central issues and problems of contemporary analytic philosophy. Philosophical Studies was founded in 1950 by Herbert Feigl and Wilfrid Sellars.

Thousands of years after Sophocles wrote the story of Oedipus Rex; psychologists named a complex . For many years psychologists have called a son having a sexual attraction toward his mother the Oedipus Complex.

Thousands of years after Sophocles wrote the story of Oedipus Rex; psychologists named a complex after the behavioral characteristics of Oedipus. It is common belief that Oedipus Rex did not actually suffer from the Oedipus Complex. The basic support for this theory can be found through Oedipus’ inherent fear of the prophecy placed upon him, by the Oracle, actually coming true. Oedipus is told, by a member of the royal court, of the prophecy of the Oracle.

Oedipus complex is completely resolved when the child, irrespective of sex, identifies symbolically with the . In a revealing passage, Chiesa recalls that "in Seminar XVII Lacan candidly admits that the Oedipus complex is, after all, simply Freud's 'dream', his own myth.

In a revealing passage, Chiesa recalls that "in Seminar XVII Lacan candidly admits that the Oedipus complex is, after all, simply Freud's 'dream', his own myth.

This small text is a study of the Oedipus Complex in the work of Sigmund Freud, creator of psychoanalysis. The Oedipus Complex is a theory about the mental life of the child. Briefly summarized, it postulates that in early childhood between the ages of two to six, the child develops two emotional ties with its parents, a tie that is purely affectionate with the parent of the opposite sex and a hostile tie to the parent of the same sex, who is perceived as a rival. At the end of his career, Freud made the dramatic statement: "if psychoanalysis could not claim any other achievement beside the discovery of the repressed Oedipus Complex, this alone would give it the right to a place among the new and precious conquests of humanity."

Comments

Xinetan Xinetan
great condition, brand new. good book, needed to read it for psychology class to understand what my professor was talking about. good book if interested in reading
Vrion Vrion
A good book but I was a little disappointed because the subtitle suggests more than the book actually delivers. I understand the term "philosophical" as a critical analysis of the language and logic of an idea. The author seems to do a good job of explaining Freud's ideas, but then merely defends them rather than critically analyzing them.

For example, the author says Freud's method was "scientific," because theories were supported by empirical observations, hence psychoanalysis is similar to astronomy. But astronomy is actually characterized by systematic observations and precise measuring instruments, while psychoanalysis consists of somewhat random and subjective observations. If anything psychoanalysis has more in common with astrology than astronomy.

I think Freud was indeed very intelligent and had many important insights, but the claim to "genius" is hardly supported in this book. For example, Freud said the child has "sensual" desires even before the "genital stage," which survive as the adult's desire for oral foreplay. But the word "sensual" is used interchangeably with "erotic," and is not defined or distinguished from other forms of pleasure. Where is the evidence that all or most children go through a "genital stage?"

Another example: Freud said the child's "love" for the opposite sex parent had "erotic (passionate) components." But if the very young child doesn't yet know about genital intercourse, how can he imagine - let alone desire - sexual possession of the parent?

A surprisingly superficial claim is that the popular English explicative "motherf--ker" is evidence of the psychic importance of oedipal wishes. But in some other languages the term is actually rare. "Sisterf--ker" and "Cuckold" are much more common in the two foreign languages I'm familiar with. Is the popular accusation of "Cuckold," evidence that people want to be deceived into providing for somebody else's progeny?

The very choice of the phrase "Oedipus Complex" is poorly defended. The original story of King Oedipus is actually about the ancient Greek belief in the inevitability of destiny, not incest or patricide. And it was Oedipus' father Laius who attempted to kill his infant son long before the boy did anything wrong.

The author takes the existence of "repression," for granted, without a word about the critical dispute of "repression" among psychiatrists themselves. (See Paul R. McHugh's "Try to Remember: Psychiatry's Clash over Meaning, Memory and Mind.")

Freud said overcoming selfish love for the parent is a child's greatest challenge. But I think a far more important challenge is for the parent to overcome his or her jealous love for the child. To allow the child to love others and be loved by others, rather than demand that the child become the father or mother's exclusive lover and love object.

This is a challenge many parents fail to meet, to the child's detriment; and some people even dispute the very value of unselfish love, as some single mothers claim a child "doesn't need" a father. Quite the contrary, it seems clear to me that a child benefits from having as many loving caregivers as possible. Three or four loving caregivers for every child should be the minimum!

Statistics suggest that sexual incest may be rare, but there is an epidemic of emotional incest today - parents trying to exclusively control, dominate, possess and isolate their children. The kids aren't the ones guilty of that. Physical and mental independence are the hallmarks of maturity. A responsible adult doesn't encourage a child's mental dependency on the parent as long as possible.

One part I enjoyed: According to Freud, teachers are claimed to be parent-substitutes, who don't deserve the feelings students "transfer" onto them. And yet: "We are capable of learning from our schoolteachers precisely because we love them. The need to be loved by our teachers provides the best motivation to learn." (p. 23)

- Frank Adamo, author of "Girl Becomes Woman."