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eBook Supernormal Stimuli: How Primal Urges Overran Their Evolutionary Purpose ePub

eBook Supernormal Stimuli: How Primal Urges Overran Their Evolutionary Purpose ePub

by Deirdre Barrett

  • ISBN: 039306848X
  • Category: Psychology and Counseling
  • Subcategory: Fitness and Nutrition
  • Author: Deirdre Barrett
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: W. W. Norton & Company; First Edition edition (February 22, 2010)
  • Pages: 224
  • ePub book: 1156 kb
  • Fb2 book: 1844 kb
  • Other: mobi doc lrf doc
  • Rating: 4.3
  • Votes: 487

Description

Supernormal Stimuli: How Primal Urges Overran Their Evolutionary Purpose is a book by Deirdre Barrett published by W. W. Norton & Company in 2010. Barrett is a psychologist on the faculty of Harvard Medical School.

Supernormal Stimuli: How Primal Urges Overran Their Evolutionary Purpose is a book by Deirdre Barrett published by W. The book argues that human instincts for food, sex, and territorial protection evolved for life on the savannah 10,000 years ago, not for today's densely populated technological world.

Deirdre Barrett is an evolutionary psychologist at Harvard Medical School’s Behavioral Medicine Program. She is the author of several books, including Waistland, Trauma and Dream, and Supernormal Stimuli. She lives in Cambridge, Massachusetts. Hardcover: 224 pages.

Evolutionary psychologist Deirdre Barrett applies this concept to the . My last book, Waistland, explored how supernormal food stimuli have. produced our obesity crisis

My last book, Waistland, explored how supernormal food stimuli have. produced our obesity crisis. The present book will use the concept to explore.

Supernormal Stimuli book. Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read

Supernormal Stimuli book. A Harvard psychologist explains how our once-helpful instincts. Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read. Start by marking Supernormal Stimuli: How Primal Urges Overran Their Evolutionary Purpose as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read.

She also reminds us that by exercising self-control we can rein them in, potentially saving ourselves and civilization. Norton & Company, 22 февр. A Harvard psychologist explains how our once-helpful instincts get hijacked in our garish modern world.

Evolutionary psychologist Deirdre Barrett, Assistant Clinical Professor at Harvard .

Supernormal stimuli" are unnatural imitations of normal cues which can "exert a stronger pull than the real thing. Barrett argues that supernormal stimuli can evoke intergroup conflict, seeing expensive, high-tech military hardware as an example of a supernormal stimulus, superseding primitive displays such as war dances and chestbeating.

Stimuli : How Primal Urges Overran Their Evolutionary Purpose. Waistland: The R/evolutionary Science Behind Our Weight and Fitness Crisis.

Supernormal Stimuli : How Primal Urges Overran Their Evolutionary Purpose.

A Harvard psychologist explains how our once-helpful instincts get hijacked in our garish modern world.

Our instincts―for food, sex, or territorial protection― evolved for life on the savannahs 10,000 years ago, not in today’s world of densely populated cities, technological innovations, and pollution. We now have access to a glut of larger-than-life objects, from candy to pornography to atomic weapons―that gratify these gut instincts with often-dangerous results. Animal biologists coined the term “supernormal stimuli” to describe imitations that appeal to primitive instincts and exert a stronger pull than real things, such as soccer balls that geese prefer over eggs. Evolutionary psychologist Deirdre Barrett applies this concept to the alarming disconnect between human instinct and our created environment, demonstrating how supernormal stimuli are a major cause of today’s most pressing problems, including obesity and war. However, Barrett does more than show how unfettered instincts fuel dangerous excesses. She also reminds us that by exercising self-control we can rein them in, potentially saving ourselves and civilization. 55 illustrations

Comments

Lanionge Lanionge
If you like to read about science in the mainstream media you have probably seen many articles about how the instincts which made human beings evolutionarily adaptive in the African savanna are having negative consequences in the modern West. As far as I can tell, this is the book that spawned the genre.

Besides being written by a scientist rather than a journalist—Dr. Barrett is a psychologist at Harvard Medical School—you might wonder if there is any reason to read the original.

The answer is a resounding yes. First, unlike the many paleo popularizers, Barrett’s account is light on speculation and strong on scientific fact. More significantly, Barrett has a somewhat radical vision of a reformed society which is lacking in most popular science stories.

Noting that the sources of pleasure can be easily rewired in the human brain, Barrett envisions a society where people are nudged from unhealthy pleasure sources like sugar and television to vegetables and real social contact. In other words, less reruns of “Friends” and more real friends. Less Coke and cheeseburgers and more lean meat and cauliflower.

Of course, these insights have moved into the mainstream of public discourse and are not as startling as they were when Barrett first made them. But reading the original source shows that these ideas do not stem from pop psychology but rather have a real scientific grounding. In short, they are not meant for interesting banter at parties frequented by millennial but could lead to real and lasting improvements in human society.
Nagis Nagis
When I picked up the book I did not have high hopes. I was very pleasantly surprised to read the first chapter about the Niko Tinbergen and Konrad Lorenz. I had read about them individually but not as in this telling of their long and happy relationship which bore intellectual fruits for both. A heart warming story. That was just the first chapter. The second chapter deals with our ideas on beauty, sex and attractiveness as derived from the concepts of sociobiology. The author's style is light yet the content comes across wonderfully. She is a capable write and I venture that she is a capable scientist as well because to describe something so well you have to fist understand it well.
I am thoroughly enjoying reading this book and will sure to check out her other books.

King Solomon's Ring (Routledge Classics)
Curious Naturalist
Perius Perius
Fascinating book, I read this in college for my evolutionary psychology course several years ago. To this day, I still site some of their ideas in conversations involving "why we instinctively do things that don't make sense". I consider it a must read for someone with a curious and open mind!
X-MEN X-MEN
But I wish it could have been longer and more detailed about our evolved psychology. That being said, it is written in coherent and clear style. You don't need much background information to understand the book's argument.

Anyone who is interesting in evolutionary psychology would really like this book.
Siatanni Siatanni
This book didn’t meet my expectations. The bibliography is very poor and the subject is not well developed. In summary, this is a ‘light cientific book’.
Lynnak Lynnak
After reading this book I gave it to my fifteen year-old son to read, to try to stimulate an interest in evolutionary psychology.

The author doesn't have enough material on supernormal stimuli to fill a book. Thus she was forced to
1. Keep the book thin.
2. Discuss other topics from evolutionary psychology, plus a couple unrelated topics that she finds interesting.

These two factors make the book great for my kid, or anyone else without much prior exposure to evolutionary physchology. More focused and rigorous books can be long and tedious to read. This book is fun and entertaining.

If you've already read a half-dozen books on evolutionary psychology, the two factors above make this book disappointing. This book will certainly teach you something new and give you a few new insights into topics that were already familiar. But you won't learn much about supernormal stimuli.
hardy hardy
I'm an avid popular science pleasure reader, so I ordered this book right after hearing the author on the radio. I'm so glad I did!
It is a fascinating book, very well-written. The concepts are explained in a way that makes them easy to grasp. The animal to human metaphors are truly illuminating. The main point of the book is supernormal stimuli, which are exaggerated versions of natural stimuli to which there are existing instinctual responses. Barrett discusses how our evolved instincts are overwhelmed by technological advances, population density, and other facets of modern society. She explores how pornography, unhealthy diets, and even the quest for nuclear energy as opposed to wind or solar energy can be explained by supernormal stimuli. One reader said he liked the early chapters which are closer to standard evolutionary psychology better than the later more speculative ones. I disagree: I think the ideas in the later chapters are novel and exciting and offer ideas about how to deal with problems of our modern world that I haven't heard anywhere else. Excellent book; I recommend it highly!
Great book. I highly recommend.