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eBook David and the Phoenix ePub

eBook David and the Phoenix ePub

by Edward Ormondroyd

  • ISBN: 1604596910
  • Category: Animals
  • Subcategory: For Children
  • Author: Edward Ormondroyd
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: SMK Books (December 16, 2009)
  • Pages: 76
  • ePub book: 1179 kb
  • Fb2 book: 1436 kb
  • Other: azw lit doc mobi
  • Rating: 4.9
  • Votes: 184

Description

by Edward Ormondroyd. Illustrated by joan raysor. 4. In Which David and the Phoenix Go To Visit the Gryffins, and a Great Danger Is Narrowly Averted 45.

by Edward Ormondroyd. Follett Publishing Company CHICAGO. DAVID AND THE PHOENIX, by Edward Ormondroyd. 5. In Which the Scientist Arrives in Pursuit of the Phoenix, and There Are Alarums and Excursions by Night 61. 6. In Which the Phoenix Has a Plan, and David and the Phoenix Call On a Sea Monster 79. 7. In Which the Phoenix's Plan Is Carried Out, and There Are More Alarums and Excursions in the Night 99.

Home Edward Ormondroyd David and the Phoenix. David had been to the zoo, and at home he had a book of birds withcolored pictures

Home Edward Ormondroyd David and the Phoenix. David and the phoenix, . 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10. 2: In Which David Meets the Phoenix, and There Is a Change in Plans. There stood an enormous bird. David had been to the zoo, and at home he had a book of birds withcolored pictures. He knew the more common large birds of the world:the ostrich, the condor, the albatross, eagles, cranes, storks.

Illustrated by Joan Raysor. This was David's first sight of the fabulous Phoenix and the beginningof a pleasant and profitable partnership. David knew that one should be prepared for anything when one climbs amountain, but he never dreamed what he would find that June morning onthe mountain ledge. There stood an enormous bird, with a head like an eagle, a neck like aswan, and a scarlet crest. The most astonishing thing was that thebird had an open book on the ground and was reading from it! This was David's first sight of the fabulous Phoenix and the beginningof a pleasant and profitable partnership.

Edward Ormondroyd is a Treasure. David and the Phoenix belongs among the classics of children’s literature. 5 people found this helpful. It is a charming story about David moving, and ending up with a mountain in his back yard, and there is a phoenix, not just a phoenix, but THE PHOENIX the one and only.

David and the Phoenix is a 1957 children's novel about a young boy's adventures with a phoenix. The first published book by American children's writer Edward Ormondroyd, it is a tale of friendship between two different species-a young. The first published book by American children's writer Edward Ormondroyd, it is a tale of friendship between two different species-a young boy and a mythical bird-and focuses on David's education in the ways of the mythical world. The book ends with the phoenix's rebirth.

Edward Ormondroyd has written a stimulating, ageless story

Edward Ormondroyd has written a stimulating, ageless story. It combines beautiful writing, topnotch adventure, and enchanting fantasy. - Chicago Tribune "1957". Many years ago, a book taught a young boy that imagination and wonder have wings. It is a charming story about David moving, and ending up with a mountain in his back yard, and there is a phoenix, not just a phoenix, but THE PHOENIX the one and only

napping sound from below, and David's foot was released. He unstuck the snag from his shirt, pushed his way out of the thicket, and sat down weakly on the grass. Whew! At least the bird was not going to harm him.

napping sound from below, and David's foot was released. It seemed to be quite a kindly creature, really. He had just frightened it and made it angry by bursting out of the bushes so suddenly. He heard a flailing in the thicket, followed by the bird's anxious voice: "Hello! Are you still there?"

The Phoenix introduces David to an endless list of his friends from . well perhaps you should read the book yourself and find your.

The Phoenix introduces David to an endless list of his friends from mythology and in the process opens David's eyes to the wide world both the unseen world and seen world. The phoenix takes David on "educational field trips" to meet sea monsters, fauns and other creatures well perhaps you should read the book yourself and find your own lessons within the pages. A well written story, "David and the Phoenix" has no particular time setting so that it could very well be placed in current time.

Edward Ormondroyd is an American author of children's books. He is best known for David and the Phoenix. Ormondroyd grew up in Pennsylvania and Michigan before serving on a destroyer escort in World W. Ormondroyd grew up in Pennsylvania and Michigan before serving on a destroyer escort in World . .ar II. After the war he attended the University of California at Berkeley, earning a Bachelor's degree in English and a masters in Library Science. In 1970 he moved from Berkeley to Ithaca, New York, where he currently lives. MoreLess Show More Show Less. Books by Ormondroyd Edward: David And the Phoenix.

LibriVox recording of David and the Phoenix, by Edward Ormondroyd. David knew that one should be prepared for anything when one climbs a mountain, but he never dreamed what he would find that June morning on the mountain ledge. There stood an enormous bird, with a head like an eagle, a neck like a swan, and a scarlet crest. The most astonishing thing was that the bird had an open book on the ground and was reading from it! This was David's first sight of the fabulous Phoenix and the beginning of a pleasant and profitable partnership.

When young David moves into his new home, he decided that it would be more fun to go exploring the mountains around him, rather than unpack. When he reaches the summit of the mountain, he is met by a Phoenix, after getting over their initial fright, they become good friends, and the phoenix decides to show him the magical wonders of his world. During their adventures there are many narrow escapes!

Comments

DireRaven DireRaven
I was a child in Wisconsin, in the 50’s, when this beautiful story was published but didn’t find it until now. I love David and the Phoenix. The Kindle version lovingly recreated the book perfectly. The print version is beautiful with illustrations. When researching the Author I found him still available to send out a heartfelt thank you to. When reading an interview I discovered an audio version of David and the Phoenix was recorded in 2002, I believe. Voice actors do the different characters but Edward Ormondroyd reads the narrative. I highly recommend getting this also. I have purchased several copies of this book to give to young friends and family.

Edward Ormondroyd is a Treasure. David and the Phoenix belongs among the classics of children’s literature.
caster caster
I was disappointed in this hardback edition. It has none of the lovely illustrations of the original.

The three star rating is for this 2008 reprint edition only. The story is five stars, no questions about it.

Don’t buy this edition unless it is the only way to get the book.

Several years ago, I got an earlier hardback edition on Amazon from one of their wonderful used book sellers. It is in great shape complete with book jacket. As an earlier edition, it has the illustrations. Buy a used older hardcover edition.

A friend of mine got the Amazon Kindle edition and she tells me it has the illustrations. Buy the Kindle edition, unless like me you like to hold the book in your hands.

I haved loved this story since my fourth grade teacher read us the Scholastic Books edition. It was several years old then, but the class was riveted by its magic.

But even if you can only get this 2008 illustration devoid edition, you will treasure this captivating story.
Cordalas Cordalas
This book is a children's classic that I have read dozens of times throughout my life. It holds up as well in old age as it did in 5th grade. I almost took a star off for the new cover but I couldn't do that to one of my favorite books. This is a smartly written story that doesn't dumb down it's language for children. It always makes me laugh out loud at the funny parts, hyperventilate at the scary moments and cry at the ending. David is a young boy who climbs a mountain and meets a Phoenix. The mystical creature decides that David's education has been neglected and he proceeds to take him on grand adventures around the world. On this latest reading, I did find myself nostalgic for a childhood where kids could go out and play all day without over-protective parents trying to control their every move. That being said, I would totally not fly around the world on the back of a Phoenix.
Dyni Dyni
I first read David and the Phoenix in 1957 when I was in fifth grade. I was enchanted and have thought about this book all through my life. I have probably read it 20 times as an adult for nothing more than the opportunity to spend some more time with both the Phoenix and David . I could not rate this book on entertainment scale any higher ! It is wonderful and I am going to look to buy two hard copies to give to children of friends, hoping they will be as enchanted and enthralled I have been.
Hawk Flying Hawk Flying
I first read David and the Phoenix some time around 5th grade (the Scholastic Books Edition), and I am now 67 and read it to my Teddy Bears and the grand nieces and nephews cuddled with them). It is a charming story about David moving, and ending up with a mountain in his back yard, and there is a phoenix, not just a phoenix, but THE PHOENIX the one and only. And, and, and... Well, an evil scientist, and myth weave in and out of the story. Not simply mythology as we usually understand it, but the gentle teaching that the true meaning of mythology implies.
It shows up from time to time in other stories. I most recently ran across it in David Weber's "At all Costs" (an Honor Harrington Series Novel). Edward Ornondroyd's "David and the Phoenix" will continue to enchant and engage children until our civilization crumbles, and beyond...

--Lowell Morrison
KiddenDan KiddenDan
Have bought three of these. One for me because I remember it as being one of my favorites when I was a kid and two more to foist upon my grandchildren. I don't have any feed back from the grandchildren which makes me think they didn't weep like I did when they got to the end of the book. Still I had to do it. Had to share the story just in case some kid thinks they're still a good read. The book seems to go out of print and these books need to be out there circulating - whether they are saved, traded in or re-gifted to the Goodwill. It would be a shame to have them just be forgotten.
Wizard Wizard
Three times in my childhood my dad brought home a book I had never heard of and read the first chapter to us at the dinner table. Each time was magical to me. The first of the Harry Potter books was one (about the time the Chamber of Secrets first came out), another was Midshipman Hornblower. Adavid and the Phoenix was the third.

Unlike the other two, this one remains in obscurity and difficult to find in print. It deserves an honored place on your bookshelf, and is something I look forward to reading to my two small boys once they are nine or ten. You won't regret reading it.
I first read this book in 1967 when I was 13. I lived way out in the country, but the Bookmobile made a stop at our house and I discovered this book. As another reviewer said, I ran across it again in David Weber's books. Now I have it on my Fire 8, and can enjoy it once again.

Other reviewers have covered the story better than I can, so read their reviews, please.