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eBook This House on Fire: The Story of the Blues (The African-American Experience) ePub

eBook This House on Fire: The Story of the Blues (The African-American Experience) ePub

by Craig Awmiller

  • ISBN: 0531112535
  • Category: Arts Music and Photography
  • Subcategory: For Children
  • Author: Craig Awmiller
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Franklin Watts (May 1, 1996)
  • ePub book: 1808 kb
  • Fb2 book: 1943 kb
  • Other: doc mbr mobi azw
  • Rating: 4.3
  • Votes: 885

Description

Author Craig Awmiller takes readers on a journey that begins on one continent and evolves onto another. After the end of the . Civil War and of slavery, African American entertainers began performing for black audiences.

Author Craig Awmiller takes readers on a journey that begins on one continent and evolves onto another. The blues began in Africa. In West Africa, there were traveling musicians and storytellers who played an instrument similar to the banjo. These entertainers were knows as "griots. One of his most famous pieces was called "The Entertainer.

African social and political movements. This is a strong introduction to the people who compose the blues world and to the importance of blues music in the United States.

This inspiring series covers various aspects of black history and the black experience, from ancient civilizations to today's African social and political movements. Here's the story of the blues, from its genesis in the impoverished rural South, through its expansion to the urban North, to its resurgence and enduring influence on jazz, rock, and rap in the 1990s.

This House on Fire book. A nice intro to the blues, its about as in depth as the skinniness of the book would make you think, but an enjoyable read none the less. This House on Fire: The Story of the Blues.

Gives a history of blues music from its origins in the 1930s to the present day, with discussions of its African roots and its influence on other music.

In contrast, wealthy African Americans live in neighborhoods that are nearly as black as the poorest African American . Such a story fails to gain traction because it lacks a moral explanation of the sort a white narrator is likely to want to convey.

In contrast, wealthy African Americans live in neighborhoods that are nearly as black as the poorest African American neighborhoods: segregation works differently for black Americans than for other groups. As recent shootings by the police – of Michael Brown in Ferguson, Missouri; Trayvon Martin in Sanford, Florida; Philando Castile in Falcon Heights, Minnesota; John Crawford in an Ohio Walmart – show, something has changed in America today.

African-Americans (also known as Black Americans and Afro-Americans) are an ethnic group in the United States. The first achievements by African-Americans in various fields historically marked footholds, often leading to more widespread cultural change. The shorthand phrase for this is "breaking the color barrier".

Find this book in a library near you, using WorldCat.

Reading Level: High School Genre: Non Fiction Publisher: Franklin Watts 1996. Find this book in a library near you, using WorldCat. Traces the history of the blues from its African roots through the 90s, with a focus on key artists ranging from Louis Armstrong to Muddy Waters and .

The African-American novelist journeys to Ghana, once a hub of the trans-Atlantic slave trade, as the nation invites .

The African-American novelist journeys to Ghana, once a hub of the trans-Atlantic slave trade, as the nation invites descendants of enslaved Africans to call it their home. Children play on the shores of the Atlantic ocean against a backdrop of Elmina Castle, where captured Africans were packed into dungeons before their enslavement in the New World. Francis Kokoroko for The New York Times. Supported by. Continue reading the main story.

Miller was the first African American to receive the Navy Cross for valor

Miller was the first African American to receive the Navy Cross for valor. An African American was not allowed to man a gun in the Navy in 1941 so Miller had received no training when he manned the machine gun to defend troops during the Pearl Harbor attack.

This would have far-reaching repercussions for the most popular entertainment of the early 20th century - the circus.

Television's most-watched history series. This would have far-reaching repercussions for the most popular entertainment of the early 20th century - the circus. The Jack London Club objected to not only the mistreatment of animals but training them for entertainment rather than allowing them to live apart from humanity in the wild.

Chronicles the evolution of blues music, from its origins in the poverty-stricken rural South, through its growth in the urban North, to its rise to popularity and enduring influence on modern music, profiling the lives of such blues greats as Bessie Smith, Muddy Waters, B. B. King, and others.

Comments

Saintrius Saintrius
Well written book about a type of music that shows Blues beginnings and form. Great resource book, with some pictures!
Tojahn Tojahn
Author Craig Awmiller takes readers on a journey that begins on one continent and evolves onto another. The blues began in Africa. In West Africa, there were traveling musicians and storytellers who played an instrument similar to the banjo. These entertainers were knows as "griots."

Between 1505 and 1870, ships from Europe began arriving on the west coast of Africa, taking approximately 10 million Africans to the Americas in the largest forced migration. As a way to cope, the griots invented new songs to describe their capture into slavery and the brutal oppression they faced. The songs then evolved on the plantation as a way to retain something from the African culture. The songs provided a creative outlet from the backbreaking work of the cotton fields.

After the end of the U.S. Civil War and of slavery, African American entertainers began performing for black audiences. One of the earliest stars was ragtime pianist and composer Scott Joplin. One of his most famous pieces was called "The Entertainer." Joplin and many others would become part of the developing musical scene, where it became possible for African Americans to make a living by performing music. The guitar became an important instrument in the development of the blues - because it was portable and most musicians could afford one.

One of the earliest blues musicians was Charley Patton, born in 1891 in Bolton, Mississippi. Music allowed him to escape a life of sharecropping, where one could never get ahead. The author wrote, "When playing the blues, Patton found, you could say all the things you felt no matter what the rich and privileged landowner might think. Through the blues, he found, he could be free."

In the United States, the blues began and developed in the Mississippi Delta. That is the flat land along the Mississippi River from the Bootheel of Missouri down to the Gulf of Mexico. This is known as the delta or folk blues. Meanwhile, the city blues developed in urban areas like Chicago. In Chicago, Muddy Waters played electric guitars and used amplifiers in the 1950s and 1960s. He performed music that would inspire blues and rock `n' roll musicians, such as The Beatles, Eric Clapton and The Rolling Stones.

Before The Rolling Stones formed, the two main members had known each other as young students growing up, but they were from different backgrounds. Mick Jagger from a middle-class family in London was a promising student at the London School of Economics. Keith Richard came from a working class home and lived in a tough neighborhood. He was expelled from a technical school for truancy. His one solace in life was playing the guitar. "This seemed, to all those around him, to be a waste of time since they thought he couldn't get steady work just playing the guitar."

However, he did find steady work playing the guitar. And they would become the driving force of The Rolling Stones, offering a unique blend of blues and rock `n' roll music.

In some cases, the blues have been described as a type of antidote for an upbeat, falsely cheery culture. "Because of their great capacity for truth telling, the blues have long been a form used by artists to examine and critique the society in which they live."

In the book, This House On Fire: The Story Of The Blues, the author takes a look at the work of these blues musicians:

· Charley Patton
· Blind Lemon Jefferson
· Robert Johnson
· Louis Armstrong
· Gertrude "Ma" Rainey
· Bessie Smith
· Huddie "Leadbelly" Ledbetter
· Billie Holiday
· McKinley "Muddy Waters" Morganfield
· The Rolling Stones
· Eric Clapton
· Sam "Lightnin" Hopkins and John Lee Hooker
· Riley "B.B." King
· Etta James
· Buddy Guy
· Robert Cray

For B.B. King, he was born in 1925 and named his guitar Lucille after a fight broke out in a dance hall. The other men were fighting over a woman named Lucille and knocked over a kerosene heater. After leaving the building, he rushed back in to rescue his guitar, which he then named Lucille.

In 1988, B.B. King recorded a song with the rock band U2 on the compact disc titled "Rattle and Hum." He also runs a blues club and restaurant on the famous Beale Street in Memphis, long known for its blues music.

In regard to his research, writing and love of the blues, author and musician Craig Awmiller has created a historical legacy where the blues will never fade. The blues have always been more than a musical style. It's a way to communicate, and it's a way to transcend pain. It's a way to find a higher self.

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Reviewed by Susan Vollmer
Author of Legends, Leaders, Legacies
[...]
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This House on Fire: The Story of the Blues (The African-American Experience)
nadness nadness
This is a terrific book for young and old alike. I admire Awmiller's moxy and soul.