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eBook Runaway Radish:El Rabano Que E ePub

eBook Runaway Radish:El Rabano Que E ePub

by Janice Levy

  • ISBN: 1932748830
  • Category: Fairy Tales Folk Tales and Myths
  • Subcategory: For Children
  • Author: Janice Levy
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Raven Tree Press; Bilingual edition (September 28, 2008)
  • Pages: 32
  • ePub book: 1565 kb
  • Fb2 book: 1345 kb
  • Other: mobi rtf lrf lrf
  • Rating: 4.3
  • Votes: 888

Description

Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read. Start by marking Runaway Radish: El Rabano Que E as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read.

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Janice Levy is a Raven Tree Press author.

Items related to Runaway Radish:El Rabano Que E. Janice Levy Runaway Radish:El Rabano Que E. ISBN 13: 9781932748826. Runaway Radish:El Rabano Que E. Janice Levy. Janice Levy is a Raven Tree Press author.

Runaway Radish - Janice Levy. The publishing company that puts out "The Runaway Radish" has a library of several billingual books with a cultural bent, and this one is no exception. I wasn't overly impressed with the. illustrations, but it seemed enjoyable enough, especially when paired with a learning opportunity.

El rábano que escapó. This is the Spanish only version of Runaway Radish. It’s the Night of the Radishes and Don Pedro wants to carve the best radish sculpture in town. But one radish won’t cooperate

El rábano que escapó. But one radish won’t cooperate. It bounces away, looking for action! So begins a raucous romp as everyone in town gets involved in the chasing of the radish. Written in a style reminiscent of The Gingerbread Man, one antic builds on another until finally the rascally radish is subdued. The Night of the Radishes is an annual festival held on the evening of December 23rd in Oaxaca, Mexico.

This is the Spanish only version of Runaway Radish. Books related to El rábano que escapó.

Don Pedro wants to care the best radish sculpture for the Night of the Radishes. One radish won't cooperate. This work is written in a style reminicent of the Gingerbread Man. It is based on the annual festival in Oaxaca, Mexico.

It's the Night of the Radishes and Don Pedro wants to carve the best radish sculpture in town. But one radish won't cooperate. It bounces away, looking for action! ? Places to go, people to see,? it shouts

It's the Night of the Radishes and Don Pedro wants to carve the best radish sculpture in town. It bounces away, looking for action! ? Places to go, people to see,? it shouts. Out of my way, you can't carve me!? So begins a raucous romp as everyone in town gets involved in the chasing of the radish who is trying to escape being made into a sculpture.

It’s the Night of the Radishes and Don Pedro wants to carve the best radish sculpture in town.

But one radish won’t cooperate. It bounces away, looking for action! So begins a raucous romp as everyone in town gets involved in the chasing of the radish

But one radish won’t cooperate. Written by Janice Levy (author) and Eida de la Vega (translator) and Illustrated by Sydney Wright.

This is the bilingual (English/Spanish) version of Runaway Radish. There is also a vocabulary page at the end of the book. Tell us if something is incorrect.

Don Pedro wants to care the best radish sculpture for the Nigh of the Radishes. One radish won't cooperate. Written in a style reminicent of the Gingerbread Man. Based on the annual festival in Oaxaca, Mexico. Bilingual edition in English and Spanish.

Comments

Flash_back Flash_back
We loved this story. We found it in the library. And had to get our own copy. The story is cute, the translation is great.
Cerekelv Cerekelv
This is a cute story that incorporates a lot of spanish words. My students seemed to like it. The end was a bit unexpected and a little disappointing, but overall a pretty good story.
Asher Asher
very creative story idea. fun for those of us who love the radishes festival and little kids, too. enjoyable story
Arar Arar
Great book!
Damdyagab Damdyagab
I used this book in my classroom and the kids liked it so much, I'm asking the principal to order a class set.
The book comes in three versions: English, Spanish and bilingual.
The students wrote their own folktales and made charts to sequence the events of the story. The kids really got into it.
The words are simple and the illustrations are vibrant. The book just speeds along,with the antics of the radish getting wackier by the page. I suggest that each time you read it, you leave out more parts of the story - (like the song "And Bingo was his name-o") until the kids recite the entire book from memory.
I also made a "word wall" of new vocabulary, like "mariachi" --I learned some Spanish, too!
The author wrote a book about foster care, "Finding the Right Spot" and one about a mean bully,"Alley Oops." My school and neighborhood library had those, so my students were familiar with her work, but I didn't know she did bilingual books,too.
I STRONGLY RECOMMEND THIS BOOK - it's not easy holding kids' attention, but this one made learning fun.
Loni Loni
This is an awesome take on The Gingerbread Man. My oldest son Dexter read it aloud to two of his younger siblings. He really liked how it is in both English and Spanish. This is a good book for both English and Spanish speaking children. This is the type of book that can aid in the instruction of another language.
Hunaya Hunaya
Perfect for classroom and public libraries. Kids laughed and repeated the refrain, asked questions about Mexico. The book has educational and entertainment appeal. As a bonus, it's being used in a Masters Education program at colleges for those interested in literacy and E.S.L. degrees. I was lucky enough to hear the author speak about this book and her other multicultural titles.
I've been reading it to my own kids for several days, now. It's a winner!
"Runaway Radish" is a story similar to "The Gingerbread Man". The story is about the Radish Festival held yearly in Oaxaca, Mexico. Just as the carver was about to finish carving his radish sculpture, the last radish ran away. It is a delightful children's story. The bright, colorful illustrations are very animated and thus appealing to children.

Now no review regarding any children's book would be complete without a glimpse of what its target audience, a child, thinks. As a result, I had all three of my children read and review "Runaway Radish". All of them liked "Runaway Radish", especially my six year old son. My oldest, nine, thought the book was kinda cheesy (her words), but liked the Spanish on each page. She liked trying to figure out what each word was. After a mini-Spanish lesson from mom, she was much more successful. The vocabulary list in the back is also very helpful for children.

I loved the story. The history regarding the origination of the story helps the reader understand the setting for the story. I know that what is included on the dust-jacket of a hardcover is not always also included on a soft-cover. I hope they keep this information, though, as it is very useful. Without this background, the reader might wonder why the main character was displaying radishes as he was. It would still be a good story, but is even better with this touch of reality "thrown" in.

I also loved the English/Spanish on each page. As a homeschooling mom who loves literature-based and "real-life" learning, I see this as a great tool. Anyone can memorize a set of letters, words, or conjugation rules. But nothing helps one truly grasp a language like seeing it used in a "real" story. It brings the language to life like no textbook ever could. I imagine it would do the same for ESL students.

"Runaway Radish" is a cheerful, fun story that is also educational. I would recommend this book to homeschooling parents desiring to teach their children Spanish as well as to the "traditional" Spanish or ESL student.